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Help, semi gloss poly dries to a dull haze

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Forum topic by BLuh posted 04-02-2017 05:13 AM 787 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BLuh

7 posts in 258 days


04-02-2017 05:13 AM

Topic tags/keywords: poly semi gloss dried dull

I’m new here and I’m hoping someone can help me before I give up and strip my bar top and start over. For background I used 4 coats of minwax oil based stain followed by three coats of minwax fast drying semi gloss poly. I followed directions on back of can yet the poly has dried to a dull haze. I called minwax and they said I either had moisture in the poly or solvents and they recommended using mineral spirits to open the top coat up which may release the moisture. I did this as directed for 3 days and no luck. I will say when I wiped on the mineral spirits the top looked georgeos until it dried back to the original dull haze. This leads me to believe that the issue is on the surface as opposed to too much stain etc. My plan was to finish the bar top with epoxy but I can’t do that until I get the top to shine as I’d hate to seal the top looking dull as it does now. Unless of course the epoxy would seal it as a wet glass look? Sorry for the long post but I’m at a loss and hopeful I don’t have to strip this down and start over. Thanks in advance for any advice.


11 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3828 posts in 1605 days


#1 posted 04-02-2017 02:21 PM

I am pretty sure it is the stain as this has happened to me before. Basically, what happens is that too much stain takes a long, long, long time to dry and when you apply the topcoat to the wet stain, part of it resolves in with the stain and creates that foggy look underneath. It does the same thing with a water dye that has not completely dried. Get a scrap board, put the stain on it and shortly after spray it with poly and see if get the same result.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

979 posts in 429 days


#2 posted 04-02-2017 02:35 PM

I agree that four layers of oil stain is way too much. Basically you painted the wood instead of staining it.Secondly why do you need semigloss polyurethane if you planned to use epoxy (which is very glossy) ?
I would take a sander, sand everything to the bare wood and start over
One application of the stain
Coat of shellac to seal
Epoxy

View BLuh's profile

BLuh

7 posts in 258 days


#3 posted 04-02-2017 02:38 PM

I thought it might’ve been the same thing, but the only reason I thought it might be the top surface is because it shines real nice when I initially wiped it with mineral spirits.

View BLuh's profile

BLuh

7 posts in 258 days


#4 posted 04-02-2017 02:52 PM

I put 4 coats of stain to achieve the color I wanted. As far as the poly, as per the epoxy instructions prior to applying the epoxy it states to put at least 3 coats of oil based poly. Is there anything that can sand poly coats off with minimal damage to stain underneath?

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

3647 posts in 2247 days


#5 posted 04-02-2017 03:01 PM

4 coats of stain = serious overkill. Was it not dark enough? Some special effect you were looking for?

Carloz method is probably the best to get somewhere moving forward with your project. The stain may be dry but it is far from cured after 4 coats. A test for stain ready to be coated I use is to rub a white cloth across it. If it has the stain on it it is not cured enough.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View BLuh's profile

BLuh

7 posts in 258 days


#6 posted 04-02-2017 03:08 PM

Thanks for all the advice. I did 4 coats of stain everywhere else on bar w no issues not sure why the bar top turned out different. I may just have to start over. I assume if I did epoxy pour over the full finish the epoxy would not dry to a shine? Only reason I ask this is someone suggested this but it sounded too good to be true

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

613 posts in 746 days


#7 posted 04-02-2017 04:09 PM



Thanks for all the advice. I did 4 coats of stain everywhere else on bar w no issues not sure why the bar top turned out different. I may just have to start over. I assume if I did epoxy pour over the full finish the epoxy would not dry to a shine? Only reason I ask this is someone suggested this but it sounded too good to be true

- BLuh

While stripping down to bare wood and starting over would take allot of effort, is it worth the risk of applying the epoxy and having it turn out badly? The epoxy should be basically crystal clear. If the poly finish is hazy it stands to reason it would show through the epoxy with unsatisfactory results.

I agree with Carloz on this one.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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BLuh

7 posts in 258 days


#8 posted 04-02-2017 04:16 PM

Ok. Thanks guys. I’ll strip it and start over. I’ll let you know how it turns out.

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

479 posts in 1307 days


#9 posted 04-02-2017 05:13 PM

Why would you put poly under an epoxy glaze in the first place?

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View BLuh's profile

BLuh

7 posts in 258 days


#10 posted 04-02-2017 05:16 PM

Because those are the specific instructions contained on the epoxy. You need to seal w poly prior to epoxy as per the instructions. This is my first time doing this.

View BLuh's profile

BLuh

7 posts in 258 days


#11 posted 04-02-2017 08:02 PM

I stopped into a local paint store and they suggested I try a wipe on poly gloss before I sanded and started over. Glad I did, problem solved! It cleared up the dull haze and it is now shining beautifully.

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