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Building cabinets, need some advice

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Forum topic by SweetTea posted 04-01-2017 12:46 PM 419 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SweetTea

242 posts in 496 days


04-01-2017 12:46 PM

I am getting ready to start building a set of kitchen cabinets for a family member. They want some pilisters, and corner trim on the base cabinets. They are getting a solid surface countertop so I thought it might also look nice to have some of the base cabinets be deeper than the surrounding cabinets.

Anyway…the back wall is where the range will be. Since it will have two 36” x 36” corner cabinets with lazy Susan’s on each side, and the range opening will be 30.5” (the wall itself is 159.25” wide) I don’t really have the space to deepen some of the cabinets since it would look odd to have the corner cabinets be less deep than the cabinets next to them.

My thoughts are to build two towers that are 6” wide (by 34.5” tall) that will go on each side of the range and be 26” deep and have a nice looking table leg style pilister that is flat on the back mounted to the front of each tower. It would thus give some flair to that wall of cabinets and create a cool effect for the counter top. Having never done this, can you guys tell me if this sounds reasonable and do you have any advice for me before I finish the design and start building? (That is: advice for the pilister towers, not cabinet building in general)


5 replies so far

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1621 posts in 2645 days


#1 posted 04-01-2017 03:01 PM

Food for thought…....two 6 in towers equal one foot..

Thats big… in a kitchen for dead space

Also I don’t know if two lazy susans at 18 in will do what your after

If you already determined you will have a 36 X 36 base…consider a 32 in kidney shape/

With two tiers you ll be more user friendly than two 18 s

What style pilasters are you planning ?

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bruc101

1197 posts in 3378 days


#2 posted 04-01-2017 03:14 PM

I think the cabinet you’re talking about is called a bump out cabinet. If you can’t make this work then I’ll give you a suggestions as to what we’ve done in the past.

Make only one leg and then saw the leg in half. Mount each half leg on a face frame style on both sides of the cabinet.

-- Bruce Free Plans http://plans.sawmillvalley.org

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1274 posts in 756 days


#3 posted 04-01-2017 04:12 PM

SweetTea,

I see nothing that would cause problems from a construction standpoint with a 6” wide towers to which the semi-cylindrical turned columns (pilaster) would attach. On the other hand, a flat properly sized board to which the pilaster is attached could probably also work and save the work of building two small boxes. The boards to which the pilasters are attached could then be attached to the cabinets on each side of the range, much like a filler strip. Some strips of plywood attached on the range side of the flanking base cabinets along the top edge would provide a little more support for the cantilevered countertop. I would probably add a little structure to support the back of the “filler” pilasters beyond screws through the cabinet side walls.

But more important is the overall design; its appearance and function. Also countertop fabrication is also a consideration. These are questions that are best answered by the family member for whom you are building the cabinets. Hopefully you could produce a sketch showing what you have in mind to better convey your ideas to your family client. The other consideration is the projection of the installed range from the back wall and how well this designs works while cooking or baking.

The money is in the corners. If my understanding is correct, the countertop will have inside corners where the countertop depth is reduced to run back to and cover the recessed pilasters. I am not sure how much more these corners would add to the cost, but probably not a lot since the countertop is a solid surface Corian type countertop.

Perhaps another option would be to build the corner cabinets to a depth of 40” to 42”. Then the remaining cabinets could be 36” deep. These bumped out end cabinets could anchor the wall and provide some texture to the hot wall.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

242 posts in 496 days


#4 posted 04-01-2017 05:42 PM



SweetTea,

I see nothing that would cause problems from a construction standpoint with a 6” wide towers to which the semi-cylindrical turned columns (pilaster) would attach. On the other hand, a flat properly sized board to which the pilaster is attached could probably also work and save the work of building two small boxes. The boards to which the pilasters are attached could then be attached to the cabinets on each side of the range, much like a filler strip. Some strips of plywood attached on the range side of the flanking base cabinets along the top edge would provide a little more support for the cantilevered countertop. I would probably add a little structure to support the back of the “filler” pilasters beyond screws through the cabinet side walls.

But more important is the overall design; its appearance and function. Also countertop fabrication is also a consideration. These are questions that are best answered by the family member for whom you are building the cabinets. Hopefully you could produce a sketch showing what you have in mind to better convey your ideas to your family client. The other consideration is the projection of the installed range from the back wall and how well this designs works while cooking or baking.

The money is in the corners. If my understanding is correct, the countertop will have inside corners where the countertop depth is reduced to run back to and cover the recessed pilasters. I am not sure how much more these corners would add to the cost, but probably not a lot since the countertop is a solid surface Corian type countertop.

Perhaps another option would be to build the corner cabinets to a depth of 40” to 42”. Then the remaining cabinets could be 36” deep. These bumped out end cabinets could anchor the wall and provide some texture to the hot wall.

- JBrow

Thanks for the advice! With regards to your last paragraph, I am not sure that I understand what are you suggesting. How would I make the corner base cabinets 40” deep and the cabinets in between them 36” deep? That seems huge, as I normally build my base cabinets 24” deep. Perhaps I am missing something here?

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JBrow

1274 posts in 756 days


#5 posted 04-01-2017 07:19 PM

SweetTea,

No you are missing anything; just my confusion and embarrassment over my error. Standard base cabinet depth is 24”. Anyway, here is what I had in mind. I am not sure this proposal makes any sense for this kitchen, but it does provide some texture on the hot wall and adjacent walls.

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