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Motor Repair on Dewalt 1030

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Forum topic by CordWood posted 04-01-2017 06:29 AM 538 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CordWood

23 posts in 386 days


04-01-2017 06:29 AM

Topic tags/keywords: dewalt radial arm saw bearings motor repair question

I posted a while ago about buying this beautiful 1030 with a 1-1/2HP 245 motor frame.

Since taking that photo I’ve taken apart most of the machine, hit rusty bits with PB Breaker, replaced much of the simple nuts and bolts hardware, and cleaned up the electrical, which had some very old cracked wiring and crumbling wire nuts.

Today I finally replaced the motor bearings, got the motor back together, clamped it to my bench and let it run. It ran fine, at least where I could tell the bearings were all good, but the fan is making an awful racket. I thought I got it firmly reset on the shaft with the snap clip in its groove after installing the bearings, but the fan seems to be rattling or rubbing the end bell.

One possibility I’ve considered is that I didn’t seat the larger, arbor-side bearing in deep enough into the end bell, but I felt like I was really forcing it, so I backed off driving it further into that end bell cavity. Should that bearing be drivin in so that it’s flush with the end of the end bell when you look at it from the outside? If so, that could have moved the entire shaft toward the fan end of the motor by as much as 1/8 of an inch.

Any suggestions on how to seat that bearing probably or how I might make sure my motor is reassembled correctly or to adjust the fan so that it runs smoothly. Should I get new C clips for both ends of the motor?

Here’s a link to the manual with an exploded diagram of the motor on Vintage Machinery for reference:

http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/252/1399.pdf

Let me know what I should be checking!

-- "What man has done, man can do."


9 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#1 posted 04-01-2017 11:47 AM

Is it possible the bearings aren’t on as far as they should be? Those fans can get loose on the shaft, so i think the first thing I’d do (unless you’re already absolutely sure) is remove the fan and run the motor to prove it’s the fan making the racket. It could be the brake, and I just removed mine completely (when Wolfe Machinery was in business they told a friend of mine they always pulled the brakes off.) Check to see the fan is fairly tight on the shaft. Lastly, to seat the bearing in the arbor side end bell easily, warm it up with a light bulb, I used a heat lamp, and the bearing will sit right in to the proper depth without force.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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CordWood

23 posts in 386 days


#2 posted 04-03-2017 04:21 AM

Fred, I heated up the end bell as you suggested and I think everything is seated where it ought to be. The engine is running and sounds good. However, now the control box has started to smoke.

I ran the motor with the control box open and I believe the smoke is coming from the capacitor.

I’ve referenced this guide to the Dewalt 1030 before:

http://www.asiteaboutnothing.net/cr_radial-arm-saw.html

I like this guide because Andy, the author, has so many parts links. But when he references capacitors he only references them being $5 from McMaster Carr.

Would you happen to know the capacitor I should get? Here is the McMaster Carr catalogue link:

https://www.mcmaster.com/#catalog/117/937/=e5lc5f

-- "What man has done, man can do."

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#3 posted 04-03-2017 11:29 AM

Well, I can tell you the one mine uses, but it’s a 1030K…a later model with a square arm (should still be the same capacitor). The one I bought is rated at 216-259 UF and that’s the important part. But it also has to fit in the space. It might be better to just remove yours and take it to a motor shop. It will cost a few bucks more, but then you have exactly what you need. As I recall, the OEM capacitor was soldered into the circuit, so you’ll have to get some connectors to put on the wires. But if yours has that rating I mentioned, the one I linked should work…it’s what i have in mine.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

605 posts in 742 days


#4 posted 04-03-2017 03:45 PM



It might be better to just remove yours and take it to a motor shop.
- Fred Hargis

+1. When I needed a new capacitor for my old DeWalt (1954 model GWH-6) I removed the cap and brought it to Grainger. Got a new one that fit perfectly for about $10 bucks, if I remember rightly.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

5975 posts in 2032 days


#5 posted 04-03-2017 04:53 PM

You can test the existing capacitor with a cheap multimeter, set in resistance mode, to see if it’s good. However, if you did not assemble the motor correctly, it could be causing the centrifugal switch to malfunction, which will toast a start capacitor pretty quickly.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View CordWood's profile

CordWood

23 posts in 386 days


#6 posted 04-03-2017 05:19 PM

Should I just open the motor back up and remove the brake? I guess this is the common wisdom.

I thought perhaps someone who had replaced their capacitor already might be able to give me an exact item # from a vendor.

-- "What man has done, man can do."

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#7 posted 04-03-2017 07:20 PM

I wouldn’t remove it now, but if you get into the motor for any other reason it doesn’t hurt to pull it. Wolfe’s opinion was they didn’t want things that could throw parts (like those springs) spinning around inside the motor. As for the capacitor, that one I linked is the one I bought, and it’s a USA made cap.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View CordWood's profile

CordWood

23 posts in 386 days


#8 posted 04-04-2017 04:30 AM

I ordered two of the McMaster-Carr 7245K17 capacitors, thanks to a tip on the Delphi forums. I got two just so I have a backup. McMaster had a strap for the capacitor listed, so I go that too. I’m not too worried about finding an alternative holder if this one doesn’t working out as there are usually lots of those little loops and holders in the hardware aisle of Lowes or Home Depot.

Is there any real noticeable advantage to having the brake in there or is it just something that’s bound to break anyway? I can always remove it while I’m waiting for the McMaster-Carr delivery. I have to spend my evenings doing something!

-- "What man has done, man can do."

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#9 posted 04-04-2017 11:21 AM

Let me ask: was your brake functional? Most of them aren’t, and cobbling together repair parts is a real futile effort. I’ve had 5 Dewalt motors apart that had brakes. 2 of them were functional, including the one on my current saw (the 1030K). I still removed it, because reassembling the motor was a lot easier. As for performance when they function, they do help slow the blade more quickly, but not so much it’s something to worry about. With new bearings, the blade on my MBF (no brake) would stop in less than 30 seconds (with worn out bearings it would take over 2 minutes). Similarly, the blade on my 1030 will stop in just over 40 seconds (no brake, and new bearings, and I guess the 10” blade versus 9” makes a difference). I didn’t time it with the brake so don’t have that info.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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