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Basic electrical question for 240v 5.3 amp saw

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Forum topic by Jaison posted 03-31-2017 12:28 AM 424 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jaison

8 posts in 259 days


03-31-2017 12:28 AM

So I am set to pick up my first table saw tomorrow. It’s a 70s Rockwell 3hp 240v 5.3amp.

I have essentially negative knowledge about electrical matters (im still young, hope to learn) but it was my understanding that I have a 240v 30 amp outlet in my garage.

Can someone confirm or explain to me if this will be fine to simply plug and play. I have to install a plug on the saw as it was wire in its previous application.


13 replies so far

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MrUnix

5973 posts in 2032 days


#1 posted 03-31-2017 12:31 AM

Ummm… are you sure that is a single phase machine, and not three phase? A 3hp single phase should be rated at much more than 5.3A.

If it’s single phase, no problem… just get a plug to match your outlet. If three phase, you got a bit more work to do :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Jaison

8 posts in 259 days


#2 posted 03-31-2017 12:39 AM

Edit

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Jaison

8 posts in 259 days


#3 posted 03-31-2017 12:41 AM

Sorry forgot to insert the image.

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Jaison

8 posts in 259 days


#4 posted 03-31-2017 12:42 AM

I see now. It’s 3 phrase.

What does that mean for me?

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MrUnix

5973 posts in 2032 days


#5 posted 03-31-2017 12:49 AM

You got a three phase machine, so it won’t work as-is with the single phase 240v outlet you have in your garage. Best option would be to put a VFD on it… something like the TECO L510-202 (the L510-203 would be overkill), which will give you a lot of extra benefits and features not otherwise available.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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eflanders

218 posts in 1683 days


#6 posted 03-31-2017 12:54 AM

The motor plate will usually say if it is a 1 or 3 phase. As Brad says, single phase is an easy DIY project as all you do is match a proper plug to the appropriate 220V receptacle. If it’s a 3 phase motor, you need to get a phase converter or a new motor.

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Jaison

8 posts in 259 days


#7 posted 03-31-2017 01:00 AM

It all seemed too good to be true.

Thanks for the info. I’ll read up on a converter and decide if I still want to follow through.

Thoughts on the saw? Even with the converter it’s abetter deal than anything else I’ve seen in the last two months.

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1269 posts in 753 days


#8 posted 03-31-2017 01:00 AM

Jaison,

I will not attempt to answer your specific question. I am sure that others will specifically address this question. Instead, since you apparently are staring out in the woodworking, I think you would always appreciate having at least a basic knowledge of safe electrical wiring practices. I recommend the paperback book “Wiring Simplified”. As time goes by and as your commitment to woodworking increases, more machines may be acquired, all with their own wiring requirements. Understanding how to meet each machine’s electrical requirements in the future would probably be appreciated. I found that “Wiring Simplified” made electrical wiring per National Electric Code a very easy, understandable and informative read. For a little more than $10, I think it is a worthwhile investment. However, I do not recall that 3 phase wiring is discussed; if it is it is discussed only superficially…

https://www.amazon.com/Wiring-Simplified-Based-National-Electrical/dp/099790531X

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Jaison

8 posts in 259 days


#9 posted 03-31-2017 01:09 AM

Thanks for the recommendation. I will look into it.
Yes, I have just bought a home and want to put a shop together for a hobby.

Is the three phase motor common? This saw is coming from a school shop.

Should I just wait for something that is single phase? Trouble is this saw is in great shape for only 400$. Other used cabinet saws available now are all over 1000.
I don’t mind spending more on a converter, but obv don’t know about install etc.

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MrUnix

5973 posts in 2032 days


#10 posted 03-31-2017 01:18 AM

IMHO, a three phase machine is a vastly superior option over a single phase one, in many ways. Three phase motors are much more robust and efficient… there isn’t much to go wrong with them other than bearings (no start circuit, capacitors, centrifugal switches, etc…) so they are pretty much bullet proof. Coupled with a VFD, you get stuff you would never get otherwise – soft start, controlled braking, over-torquing and constant (load compensating) torque ability, trivial wiring, variable speeds (nice for cutting stuff like plexiglass and non-ferrous metals where it helps to reduce blade speed), ability to run up to 150% rated current for short periods of time if needed, etc… You can also sell the starter that is on the machine now to recover most (if not all) of the costs associated with the VFD, since the starter will no longer be needed.

For what you have, it’s as simple as plugging the VFD into your existing single phase 240v outlet, and wiring the motor to the VFD. You can use the existing momentary start/stop control station with the VFD to control it. Hardest part is deciding where to mount the VFD :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Jaison

8 posts in 259 days


#11 posted 03-31-2017 01:33 AM

Thanks so much brad. You’ve saved me hours of reading and misunderstanding. Seriously, thank you.

I think I’ll go for and just buy a converter.

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MrUnix

5973 posts in 2032 days


#12 posted 03-31-2017 10:45 AM

Glad I could offer some assistance. Once you get the Unisaw, post some pictures – otherwise, it never happened :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Craftsman on the lake

2706 posts in 3271 days


#13 posted 03-31-2017 11:49 AM

Or…you could take the $170 for the converter, add it to the cost of the saw you’re picking up (unless it’s a gift) and look for something used or new that would be 1 phase and do the job. i.e. I sold my 90’s 10” Delta/Rockwell table saw, in very good condition, years left of use, for $200. Granted it was a contractors saw, but heck, that’s about the price of the converter alone.

Just sayin’.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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