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Forum topic by corelz125 posted 03-30-2017 11:54 PM 999 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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corelz125

314 posts in 814 days


03-30-2017 11:54 PM

The cordless drills, circular saws, reciprocating saws, and grinders are great but how good are these cordless table saws and compressors? Anyone use them?


20 replies so far

View klassenl's profile

klassenl

183 posts in 2497 days


#1 posted 03-31-2017 12:30 AM

Cordless good – drills, impact drivers, recipro saws, flashlights, radios

Cordless not so good – circ saws

Cordless bad – everything else.

-- When questioned about using glue on a garbage bin I responded, "Wood working is about good technique and lots of glue........I have the glue part down."

View simonov's profile

simonov

51 posts in 343 days


#2 posted 03-31-2017 12:41 AM

My DeWalt cordless circular saw changed my life. Makes cutting down sheet stock to reasonable sizes almost fun.

Matthias’ review of the DeWalt cordless table saw is entertaining: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KF40KduxqeY

-- Nunc est bibendum.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

4697 posts in 1559 days


#3 posted 03-31-2017 01:51 AM

Batteries costing more than the entire corded counterpart while offering less power and a tiny fraction of the service life are the main reasons I limit my cordless tools to primarily light drilling and driving duties and sawing only when absolutely necessary. Oh yeah, they cost a crap load more too!

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2564 posts in 1863 days


#4 posted 03-31-2017 03:39 AM

I recently bought a Ryobi cordless staple gun. Liked it so well I also bought the 18 gauge brad nailer. My main reason for this was to avoid having to drag the darned compressor into the house.

These things work quite well. I was able to staple the steel angles for dry wall corners with the stapler. Drove the staples through the steel with no problem. They can easily drive a staple or brad beneath the surface in softwood, and don’t do badly on hardwood (tried on some beech I had).

They are slower than a compressor driven tool, because they seem to have a tiny compressor that takes about 1 second to cycle. The advantage of the 18 volt power source is that the batteries last a long time.

Main complaint? They are bulkier and much heavier than the compressor driven drivers. That’s a trade off I was willing to make to get the advantage of portability. I used the stapler to repair a fence that was self destructing.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

314 posts in 814 days


#5 posted 03-31-2017 03:26 PM

Ridgid has a cordless compressor now. Don’t get why they came out with that if they have cordless nailers. Maybe some of you guys out there who have your own contracting company can shed some light on this if it is beneficial.

View Moose364's profile

Moose364

5 posts in 271 days


#6 posted 03-31-2017 03:41 PM

I think it depends on the Brand of cordless you have when I had Ryobi I would have agreed with you 100% on the cric saw and the 4 1/2 grinder being not very good for more than a few cut’s. but now that I switched everything over to Milwaukee M18 and M12 I have to say Im very happy with the performance of the Cric saw and grinder, and for overhead work there M12 stuff can’t be beat. I think alot has to do with how old of stuff you have also the brushless and battery tech has grown by leaps and bounds don’t get me wrong Im not knocking Ryobi at all but my stuff was when they first came out and over 10 years old or older and still running good. I donated it to a young man that was just starting out in construction remolding trailer house’s. and as for as I know he still uses it today. and I do not work for Milwaukee I just love there cordless stuff,

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

479 posts in 1307 days


#7 posted 03-31-2017 04:38 PM

I recently bought the Milwaukee M18 FUEL (brushless DC) 7-1/4” circular saw. There was a “kit” on some special at the pro desk of my home depot. It had the saw ($229 tool-only retail), a 9AH battery ($199 retail), and their newest charger that does M12 and M18 batteries ($79). Price for the kit was $249.

The 9AH battery is a bit heavy and bulky, but this saw has more power than my “15A” corded circular saw, is lighter, and best of all it has an electronic brake that stops the blade within about half a second of taking your finger off the switch.

I used it on the factory charge to do about 30-40 cuts across and down 1/2” plywood, also used it to crosscut a lot of 2×4’s, probably 80-100 cuts there. Then I had to recharge it.

My takeaway from this is that when you consider the features, like the blade brake, it makes it worth it. If it were an identical copy with a wimpier motor, then I would change my position.

I plan on buying the M18 FUEL angle grinder and/or the deep cut metal bandsaw, which would be really handy for doing cuts on steel at the steel yard (saving myself $2 per cut that they charge)

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10634 posts in 2218 days


#8 posted 03-31-2017 07:20 PM

I’m feel fairly confident that batteries are the future. My wife knows a guy that works in battery technology and he said that the things they are working on will change everything. No doubt hyperbole but I believe that he believes it, and that battery use will continue to increase.

As for battery powered bench saws, quite a number of youtube woodworkers got them for review but I don’t remember seeing them in their shops since. Some things just aren’t practical with batteries (yet).

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View simonov's profile

simonov

51 posts in 343 days


#9 posted 03-31-2017 08:21 PM


I m feel fairly confident that batteries are the future. My wife knows a guy that works in battery technology and he said that the things they are working on will change everything. No doubt hyperbole but I believe that he believes it, and that battery use will continue to increase.

Well, I have only four battery powered tools: three 20 volt DeWalt products I purchased this year, and an old Makita power driver I think I’ve had since about 2000. I can tell you, there sure has been a massive improvement in the last decade and a half.

. . . not that I ever intend to give up my old Makita. It’s like family at this point.


As for battery powered bench saws, quite a number of youtube woodworkers got them for review but I don t remember seeing them in their shops since. Some things just aren t practical with batteries (yet).

Honestly, I don’t see any point for a battery powered bench saw in a shop. I gather they are for on-site work.

-- Nunc est bibendum.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10634 posts in 2218 days


#10 posted 03-31-2017 09:01 PM


Honestly, I don t see any point for a battery powered bench saw in a shop. I gather they are for on-site work.

- simonov


I agree with you but I remember when people said that about battery powered drills.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

119 posts in 359 days


#11 posted 03-31-2017 10:06 PM

A table saw being a stationary tool, unless you are working in a place with no power I don’t really see the point, might be useful for framing contractors, but I don’t see the universal appeal of a cordless table saw in the way a Circular saw or Drill have caught on.

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

314 posts in 814 days


#12 posted 04-01-2017 12:28 AM

The thought never crossed my mind to go dragging my table saw all over the place.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

475 posts in 388 days


#13 posted 04-01-2017 02:15 AM

I had a large cordless set of Porter Cable tools and LOVE them. I do a lot stuff lik building deer blinds and tree stands so they are handy for that I used them on a few different deck builds last year and liked not tripping over the cords and they did well. All that being said I don’t do precision work with them I hav no need or desire to hav battery table saw or miter saw. I like my electric ones A small battery air compressor would b handy but I’m thinking more for tires and not for a framing gun
There’s definitely a place for battery tools but there’s also a place for the electric tools. Also my old craftsman 113 TS is probably 30years old or more An still runs great Batteries will not last that long no matter what brand
If you need the larger tools in places without power a small/cheap generator would b the way to go I know a contractor that uses a small Honda on all his jobs. Runs his small compressor great for roofing and framing

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6433 posts in 3206 days


#14 posted 04-01-2017 04:27 AM

My only concern with battery operated tools is proper disposal of the batteries.
There was a battery factory, where I used to live in Illinois, and when it closed down it became a super fund site.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View crazyjake8493's profile

crazyjake8493

5 posts in 264 days


#15 posted 04-01-2017 04:43 AM



Ridgid has a cordless compressor now. Don t get why they came out with that if they have cordless nailers. Maybe some of you guys out there who have your own contracting company can shed some light on this if it is beneficial.

- corelz125

If someone already has air trim nailers I see where it would be an advantage. Those cordless nailers are heavy!

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