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Forum topic by Ripper70 posted 03-30-2017 10:46 PM 439 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ripper70

614 posts in 747 days


03-30-2017 10:46 PM

Hello All,

I’m working on some box design ideas and came across this wenge wood urn with a metal (I’m guessing aluminum) accent included in the finished product.

Wondering if any of you knew how this was accomplished.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo


6 replies so far

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diverlloyd

2335 posts in 1696 days


#1 posted 03-30-2017 10:55 PM

I have seen it done with a router and some welding wire. Rout a groove 1/2 the depth of the wire then epoxy it in and sand it flat. A box like that you could use the tablesaw also and do the same process.

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Ripper70

614 posts in 747 days


#2 posted 03-30-2017 11:07 PM



I have seen it done with a router and some welding wire. Rout a groove 1/2 the depth of the wire then epoxy it in and sand it flat. A box like that you could use the tablesaw also and do the same process.

- diverlloyd

What is welding wire made from?

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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jbay

1857 posts in 738 days


#3 posted 03-30-2017 11:22 PM

Mostly depends on the aluminum.
Hobby stores may sell 1/8” wide flat stock that you could use.

I use a lot of aluminum that comes in sheets approx .040 thick.
(I could send you a piece to experiment with if you wanted.)

Big box stores sell aluminum flat bar in different widths and thicknesses but you would have to cut it to the width you want and clean up the edges.

No matter what product you pick you would just rout or cut the groove on the table saw and glue it into the groove.

You could inlay the aluminum then sand it all flush and clear coat over everything.
You could cut the inlay grooves, making it so the aluminum will be flush when put in, then finish the box and add the inlay afterwards.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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Iamjacob

48 posts in 2465 days


#4 posted 03-30-2017 11:37 PM


What is welding wire made from?

There are numerous types of “welding wire” from steel to aluminum to bronze anr many more. You are most likely interested in using aluminum tig filler rod. It comes in different thicknesses and lengths as well as different varieties of aluminum. I would probably go with 4043 as it is softer than some others.

You can probably get a few rods at your local welding supply shop for a few dollars. You can also get them online at welding suppliers or amazon.

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papadan

3584 posts in 3207 days


#5 posted 03-31-2017 01:09 AM

The Borg has a roll of aluminum wire used in to tie fence. They had some 1/8 and 3/16 aluminum rods also. You can do the same thing with copper wire too.

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Ripper70

614 posts in 747 days


#6 posted 03-31-2017 01:57 AM

Thanks for all the insight, gents. Thanks also, jbay for the materials offer.

I’m gonna check out HD to see what shapes/sizes of aluminum I can scrounge and run a few tests. I might like to try the wire method as well as something a bit more substantial for a more robust look.

Would ordinary sand paper be sufficient or would I need some kind of special abrasive?

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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