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Forum topic by oldsailor59 posted 03-29-2017 07:28 PM 694 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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oldsailor59

51 posts in 271 days


03-29-2017 07:28 PM

I have wood taken from an old (100 yrs) tobacco pack house on the property. some pieces are straight and true but others have warp or twist. what are the ways to deal with warp and twist so these pieces can be used for tables and such. as far as species, I have found oak, poplar, maple, and gum. most of the pieces are less than 8” wide, 2’ to 4’ in length.

-- Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea


19 replies so far

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Rrrandy

212 posts in 319 days


#1 posted 03-29-2017 07:38 PM

I would think that you’d want to mill the warp and twist out of them. You didn’t say how thick they are. Even the ones that “look” straight and flat probably need some amount of milling.

-- Y'all need to locate a sense of humor. Borrow one if you can't find yours...

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Aj2

1179 posts in 1638 days


#2 posted 03-29-2017 08:43 PM

The warp and twisted one are perfect for making twisted wonky tables.:)

-- Aj

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canadianchips

2600 posts in 2837 days


#3 posted 03-30-2017 12:13 AM

Not sure what you have for tools?
A jointer takes warps and twists out.
Some people use router sleds as well !
Or if you are ambitious…....hand planes.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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mahdee

3829 posts in 1608 days


#4 posted 03-30-2017 12:27 AM

You can try to straighten the boards by wetting them down for 24 hours, adding 1/2” scraps on the cupped-in corners and clamping high corners over night and stacking the vertically.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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Rrrandy

212 posts in 319 days


#5 posted 03-30-2017 12:40 AM

Oldsailor, do you have a jointer?

-- Y'all need to locate a sense of humor. Borrow one if you can't find yours...

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oldsailor59

51 posts in 271 days


#6 posted 03-30-2017 12:50 PM

sorry, should have mentioned at start. I have a 4” jointer, a 12 1/2” planer, and 2 10” contractor bench table saws. the wood in question is 3/4” to 5/4” thick. most of the boards have been planed enough to reveal ‘clean’ wood.

-- Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea

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oldsailor59

51 posts in 271 days


#7 posted 03-30-2017 12:51 PM



You can try to straighten the boards by wetting them down for 24 hours, adding 1/2” scraps on the cupped-in corners and clamping high corners over night and stacking the vertically.

- mahdee


by ‘wet down’ do you mean spray/paint with water or do you mean soak in a barrel?

-- Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea

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dday

129 posts in 1270 days


#8 posted 03-30-2017 01:00 PM

Another way to salvage wood like that is to cut boards into thinner runs, i.e. a board that was 8 in wide can be cut into 3 or 4 even strips and then “worked” to glue them up into a relatively straight board. You may have to trim an 1/8 or 1/4inch here or there to take out the worse cup or bend. Also, long boards that are twisted can be cut into shorter lengths and the straightest parts salvaged for use.

I haven’t had much luck with the wetting process, but have laid board in the grass on a warm day and let nature help in correcting some less than straight boards.

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mahdee

3829 posts in 1608 days


#9 posted 03-31-2017 03:34 AM

Just hose it down soon before sun goes down to get enough moisture on both sides equally . It doesn’t have to penetrate all the way through. Main thing is that after you clamp it down, neither the top nor the bottom get excessive evaporation during drying time.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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Rrrandy

212 posts in 319 days


#10 posted 03-31-2017 03:41 AM

I’ve never “wet down” nor “hosed down” wood but I can’t imagine it’ll remove warp, twist and cupping. Only proper milling can do that.

-- Y'all need to locate a sense of humor. Borrow one if you can't find yours...

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mahdee

3829 posts in 1608 days


#11 posted 03-31-2017 07:55 AM

Well, I do it all the time… maybe you should try it. It is fibers and just like many can bend it, others can unbend them.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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eflanders

219 posts in 1691 days


#12 posted 03-31-2017 02:40 PM

With the tools you have you can remove the twist etc.. While I personally haven’t done what mahdee suggests, big box stores constantly re-stack their lumber to “realign” boards especially when stored outdoors for this reason. To remove twist mechanically, joint one face, then joint one edge using the freshly jointed edge against the fence as a reference. Then joint and / or plane the remaining surfaces making sure to use the freshly jointed edges as your reference surfaces. I straighten and use reclaimed lumber this way a lot. Often times with badly twisted stock, I’ll use winding sticks and my hand plane to take off the really bad spots first before the planer as the pressure rollers will sometimes “wrongfully” straighten a thin but twisted board.

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dalepage

317 posts in 681 days


#13 posted 04-03-2017 09:27 AM

Frankly, I’d give you zero chance of straightening those twists by dampening and clamping the boards.

If the boards are thick enough, sacrifice some wood and joint out the twist. The bad news is you’ll lose the character of the aged wood. But even after jointed, the wood will have some character, especially if it’s old growth or something really nice like chestnut.

With only 2-4 feet of length, I’d want the project to be appropriate to the short boards. Unless it was an end table, I can’t see such short boards being appropriate. They’d have to be really nice wood with a lot of character in order for me to use short lengths for a table. You’d be looking at cleats across the underside to hold them.

I’d stack them somewhere and stew on the idea of using them as is for something like outdoor tables. Maybe indoor if you left them alone with their twists and put a glass top on the table. You’d have the character of the aged wood but a flat top to use. Then you’d only have to make sure you placed the boards such that the glass wouldn’t rock.

-- Dale

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Andybb

556 posts in 444 days


#14 posted 04-07-2017 07:31 AM

How thick are they?

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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oldsailor59

51 posts in 271 days


#15 posted 04-07-2017 01:38 PM



How thick are they?

- Andybb


the boards run from 3/4 to 5/4. my thoughts at this point are to separate them and use them in spots where twist and warp don’t matter, maybe legs with true end attached to apron and other end going wherever. I think I have reached the point where spending a lot of time straightening boards just isn’t economical.

-- Scott just a tired old sailor glad to be home from the sea

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