LumberJocks

Anyone use Lock Miter bit . . . arg

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Zuki posted 2349 days ago 881 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Zuki's profile

Zuki

1404 posts in 2661 days


2349 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: pricecutter zuki lock miter

DW gave me a couple of sets of router bits several years ago and one of them contained a Lock Miter bit.

By its design it will “lock” a joint together . . . BUT . . . you have to get it set up correctly. One Saturday I spent about 3 hours playing with the bit and got nowhere . . . I was frustrated !!!!!

I just popped over to Pricecutter and saw these:

http://pricecutter.com/2-piece-lock-miter-kwik-block-sets/p/486-1837/

Anyone use them before???

-- BLOG - http://www.colorfulcanary.com/search/label/Zuki


11 replies so far

View Russel's profile

Russel

2199 posts in 2523 days


#1 posted 2349 days ago

I’ve been looking for those. I’ve seen them before, but they were sold with the bit and I already have one. In theory it should make using a rather sensitive bit a lot easier to use. But, a wise man said, “In theory there’s no difference between practice and theory, however in practice …”

I may just order a couple … a $20 experiment doesn’t seem too much if I can use the bit reliably.

-- Working at Woodworking http://www.VillageLaneFurniture.com

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2674 days


#2 posted 2349 days ago

You would need to have the same exact profile as the bit. Is it the same?

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View Russel's profile

Russel

2199 posts in 2523 days


#3 posted 2349 days ago

Well Mr. Gizmodyne, you just had to quash my excitement by stating some fact like it might not match. Now, I’m all depressed. ;-) That’s a really good point though.

-- Working at Woodworking http://www.VillageLaneFurniture.com

View Zuki's profile

Zuki

1404 posts in 2661 days


#4 posted 2349 days ago

ya giz, never thought about that

darn

-- BLOG - http://www.colorfulcanary.com/search/label/Zuki

View Don Kondra 's profile

Don Kondra

96 posts in 2470 days


#5 posted 2349 days ago

Your experience sounds a lot like mine the first time :)

Once you get it right you can save your test cuts and your money…..

The second time around goes much faster and for certain applications is worth it.

Cheers, Don

-- Don Kondra - Furniture Designer/Maker

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 2572 days


#6 posted 2349 days ago

Zuki – I would think that you would start low and inch it up little by little until it’s right.

Then as Don says, when it’s right cut a sample piece for setting up the next time.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View motthunter's profile

motthunter

2141 posts in 2383 days


#7 posted 2349 days ago

They are tricky, but Don is right. After you get it right once, keep a sample for future set ups. Remember that the thickness of the board may change the setup though.

You need to be able to make small micro adjustments in your router table to make it work. These bits require extreme precision.

cut both pieces and compare them. Next split the difference by half and adjust accordingly.

-- making sawdust....

View rikkor's profile

rikkor

11295 posts in 2458 days


#8 posted 2349 days ago

This has been on my list of tools to acquire. I hadn’t thought about trickiness of set-up.

View Tim Pursell's profile

Tim Pursell

494 posts in 2366 days


#9 posted 2349 days ago

I’ve used these bits quite a lot. Stock thickness is the key. The blocks you can buy to help set up the router table are only good for the EXACT same thickness of stock. Make sure you have more than enough stock thicknessed to finish your project & I usually run some cheaper wood or scraps thru the planner at the same time. Fiddle with the bit height & fence position untll you get the fit you want usiing the scrap pieces. then run all your fine stock. Just be sure to keep some pieces of well fitting scrap & mark the thickness. The next time you need to make the joint you will have little or no set up time – - – AS LONG AS YOU USE THE SAME THICKNESS STOCK - – - I’ve got 4 diff block sets that pretty much eliminates the hours spent setting up the router table.
I know this won’t help you set up the first time, but know that others have fought the same fight & it will be easier the next time!

Tim

-- http://www.etsy.com/shop/tpursell?ref=si_shop

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4435 posts in 2546 days


#10 posted 2348 days ago

Go to woodshopdemos.com. John Lucas has a great method of setting these and it works every time. I’ve used it a lot.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View YorkshireStewart's profile

YorkshireStewart

1106 posts in 2485 days


#11 posted 2348 days ago

I used this type of cutter on my comp entry Oak Box, and used the science of muddling through to set it up. Afterwards, I discovered this that look as as if it might work well. I like Tim’s idea.

-- Res severa verum gaudium - True pleasure is a serious business. http://www.folksy.com/shops/TreeGems

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase