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Forum topic by andy_P posted 03-28-2017 04:38 PM 1389 views 0 times favorited 39 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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andy_P

410 posts in 3043 days


03-28-2017 04:38 PM

AGE AND EXPERIENCE IS NO DEFENSE AGAINST “STUPID”. This is the hard way to convince the wife that you need a new SawStop.

Was cutting some strips from a lath-like piece. I was using a push block but not a feather board over the piece; it kept wanting to ride up so I pushed it down. Unfortunately I pushed right down on the spinning blade.

I know, we always say it…............YOU CAN’T BE TOO CAREFUL.

I’m having problems inserting pictures; did I do it right?

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.


39 replies so far

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

744 posts in 330 days


#1 posted 03-28-2017 05:11 PM

yikes!


AGE AND EXPERIENCE IS NO DEFENSE AGAINST “STUPID”.

I know, we always say it…............YOU CAN T BE TOO CAREFUL.

- andy_P

so true, all it takes is one careless or distracted moment for an accident to happen.

I recently blew my 35+ year perfect shop safety record. I had just sharpened my bench chisels and was chamfering ebony plugs for some tables I was making. I was working on a fairly large scrap of wood so as not to mar up my bench. the scrap slipped in such a way that the chisel went right into the end of my middle finger. After 6 hours waiting in the ER I was finally seen. ER doctor commented “must have been a sharp chisel, this looks like a scalpel cut”. 5 stitches and a $1000 tetanus shot later I went home. the feeling has still not fully returned to my finder tip. I’d post the pictures, but they are a little graphic.

Never take shop safety for granted.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7655 posts in 2749 days


#2 posted 03-28-2017 05:12 PM

I use Yellow Board Buddies.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View CharleyL's profile

CharleyL

221 posts in 3199 days


#3 posted 03-28-2017 05:17 PM

A Grripper would have been much cheaper and you could use it in place of those dangerous push sticks. You need something that holds the piece down as well as push it past the blade. Even a sacrificial block of wood with an L shaped bottom and a handle that extends higher than the blade would be way safer than push sticks.

Sorry you got hurt, but maybe my suggestions will help you avoid doing it again.

Charley

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5459 posts in 2648 days


#4 posted 03-28-2017 05:18 PM

Andy, sorry to hear this. Hope you heal up okay. I have had it happen to me as well.
Go on Amazon right now and order a big box of that tube gauze. That stuff will be your friend in the coming weeks.

Hey Mike,
I have those board buddies, but never have used them. How the heck do you feed stock through the saw without the pushstick getting in the way?

I went the Sawstop / Riving knife route. No matter what saw we are using we need to stay smart about it.
Be safe guys and gals.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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GR8HUNTER

2953 posts in 547 days


#5 posted 03-28-2017 05:26 PM

yes and happened really quick ….no doubt ….at least looks like you can still use it to count on …..HEAL VERY QUICKLY :<((

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Mojo1

260 posts in 2525 days


#6 posted 03-28-2017 06:36 PM

Lost about 3/4 ” off my left thumb on the table saw, I too was using a push stick but misjudged when I meant to go on the other side of the blade to hold down the piece that was wanting to hop, sounds like almost the exact same thing you did. Found the end of my thumb but they couldn’t sew it back on. Happened about 16 months ago.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2890 posts in 1823 days


#7 posted 03-28-2017 06:56 PM

Hope you heal quickly. I have used a table saw a long time and try to be very careful. It just takes a second.

And…I bought a Sawstop.

View Roger's profile

Roger

20874 posts in 2639 days


#8 posted 03-28-2017 06:58 PM

OMG Andy!! Sheesh! Sorry to see and hear of this. Wow! Don’t know how bad your thumb got it, but, regardless of how bad, it still happened. Hope you can heal up quickly. Again, sorry to hear about your accident.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4477 posts in 2186 days


#9 posted 03-28-2017 07:23 PM

This is the hard way to convince the wife that you need a new SawStop

Or at least a push stick. Be careful, to overstate the obvious.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Dan's profile

Dan

643 posts in 1727 days


#10 posted 03-28-2017 08:07 PM

I was cleaning some cured hardener off some small pieces by running them back and forth across the blade, which I had sticking up through my sled about 1/32 inch. Three times I said to myself; stop doing this, this is dangerous, you’re going to cut yourself.

I ran the tips of both ring fingers, yes, one on each hand across the blade. Fortunately I had a SawStop. Unfortunately I had it on bypass. Took all the skin off right down to the meat on both fingers.

-- Peace on Earth

View andy_P's profile

andy_P

410 posts in 3043 days


#11 posted 03-28-2017 08:14 PM

Thanks, guys. If I could only stop thinking about it and re living the event….......makes my glutes pucker every time I think about it. I was lucky in many ways though. I used the term “push stick”; I actually meant “push block”. Since this was a fairly thin piece of stock, the block was only putting pressure on the back of the piece and not holding down the front….....I used my thumb to do that…...LOL. I’m definitely going to look into one of those grippers.

My doctor is on the way to the ER so just in case I had the wife pull in and he had the opening where he was able to take care of me right away. Saved me having to fill out all the paperwork and the ER charges.

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.

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PaGeorge

18 posts in 271 days


#12 posted 03-28-2017 08:22 PM

A lot of troubles come from out of the blue… Some years back,, I was working on a staircase and a chisel rolled off the step above..A little jaunt to the hospital,,5 stitches and a $1200 bill resolved that little incident…We can argue about safety but there’s probability from must happens to can’t happens..If a thing can happen it will,,,We encounter the highly improbable every day.. I don’t have a sawstop and I doubt I ever will but I don’t think a new cartridge costs more than a visit to the hospital…So best advice must be buy the best equipment you can afford and understand that accidents don’t just happen to other people. I have a beautiful medical kit hanging in plain view in the shop area….That big red cross reminds me that I am the other people,,,good way to start a session..

-- PaGeorge

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andy_P

410 posts in 3043 days


#13 posted 03-28-2017 08:27 PM

Strange you should mention that medical kit. Just the day before I put in a fresh set of bandaids. I only wish a Bandaid would have taken care of this one. While working on my, my doctor said he uses Crazy Glue on himself sometimes. It stings but it works. I had some “Liquid Skin” in the kit at one time but it dried up the last time I went to use it.

-- Wood is a gift from God/Nature that maintains its beauty forever via the hand of a woodworker.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7655 posts in 2749 days


#14 posted 03-28-2017 08:41 PM


.......Hey Mike,
I have those board buddies, but never have used them. How the heck do you feed stock through the saw without the pushstick getting in the way? .....
- pintodeluxe

I use two push sticks, and they will/can vary in length. All of my push sticks are soft cedar. Typically, the longer push stick is in the right hand and LONG, parallel with the table saw cast iron. The left push stick keeps the piece to be cut, against the fence. Judgement has to be used on just how forward you let the left push stick go before re-positioning. All I can tell you is that this is a hell-of-alot-better than Grippers IMO (and yes I own 2 of them). As a matter of fact, I may actually consider adding 2-more on my fence. After all, that right push stick can be just another piece of lumber behind the one of interest. BTW, my recent kickback was a result of using the gripper on a too short piece of lumber with a zero-clearance insert. Just sayin’

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View clin's profile

clin

751 posts in 831 days


#15 posted 03-28-2017 11:55 PM



...
While working on my, my doctor said he uses Crazy Glue on himself sometimes.
...

- andy_P

First off, glad to see there seems to be a complete thumb under all that gauze. I hope it heals well for you.

I use CA (super glue, crazy glue) all the time when I cut myself. Usually I have no idea how I cut myself. Just notice blood on tools and stock. The CA is a quick way if the cut is a little more than a bandaid can handle. Though it is no substitute for a doctors attention on a real cut. Just a way to keep working without bleeding on things.

As you have just found out, we are all capable of being stupid. That’s the point of having safety features on things. Ideally we never need them. Some can go a lifetime and never get hurt in a shop. While attention to detail no doubt contributed to an accident free record, luck (probability) plays a roll.

Concerning stupid, I ran the metal fence of a miter gauge into my SawStop blade. Worked as advertised. But, even after I did that, it took my quite a while to understand what I did wrong..

As mentioned, get a Gripper. It’s great for cutting small stock. And a SawStop is not a bad thing either.

-- Clin

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