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Forum topic by unclearthur posted 03-28-2017 05:08 AM 667 views 1 time favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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unclearthur

121 posts in 1622 days


03-28-2017 05:08 AM

I keep running across “plans” online made in Sketchup; but when I download them they are basically a 3-d rendering of the project with no other views. They almost never have views of individual components, sub-assemblies, dimensions, etc etc like you would have with a regular plan.

I guess someone could select individual components, make copies of them, measure them etc etc and basically dissect the model but that takes a lot of time.

Am I missing something here? Is there a way to automatically “explode” a sketchup model into individual components, with dimensions shown?

What do people use these sort of sketchup models for …... is it really just a “picture” that you can rotate around or do people try to use them like they would a normal plan?

Note – I’m not knocking Sketchup at all, I think its great but I’m always disappointed by the lack of detail in the models I run across online.


13 replies so far

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Andybb

546 posts in 437 days


#1 posted 03-28-2017 06:10 AM

I just asked the exact same question! The answer is… http://lumberjocks.com/topics/212130

Go to View>Toolbars and select Layers. Then use the drop down to select “exploded”. Use the “move” tool to spread out the components.

Then you can use the “dimensions” in the Tools drop down and “tape measure” tools. But, alas it doesn’t seem that you can create a traditional cut list with dimensions all laid out probably because as you will see there are so many edges, angles, midpoints etc that the page would be unreadable. If you find a way let me in on the secret.

Another cool tool is “Scale” I wanted a 12” disk instead of the 9” one in the plans. I just grouped the related parts that needed to change and scaled it up and all of the dimensions changed automatically.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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jdmaher

417 posts in 2413 days


#2 posted 03-28-2017 02:32 PM

I believe you’re right – most Sketchup models are just 3D renderings. But they usually ARE full-scale, 3D, complete drawings.

I use Sketchup a lot. It takes plenty of effort just to create an accurate drawing. The multiple views, dimensions and cut-list (via plug-in) would take much more effort. I sometimes share my drawings, but I ain’t gettin’ paid to do so. As you say, if someone wants those extra features, they can create them.

When I use my own drawings, I usually note a few dimensions as I make each component and just start cutting.

Besides, I have never built someone else’s drawing exactly as they designed it. I always change it, sometimes significantly, then work from my modified design.

Still, I consider Sketchup and the wealth of free drawings a gift from the technology gods for which I am ever grateful.

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

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jbay

1852 posts in 733 days


#3 posted 03-28-2017 02:43 PM

The more you know how to use Sketchup the easier it is to decipher someone else’s drawing.
Not everybody draws their plans the same. Properly drawn, every piece should be drawn as a component.

There is no drop down menu to “explode” a drawing.
It’s only there if the author of the drawing added it to one of the layers.

”I guess someone could select individual components, make copies of them, measure them etc etc and basically dissect the model but that takes a lot of time.”

^This is what you have to do.
The better the author is that drew the plan, and the more fluent you are at using sketchup will determine how hard or easy it is to figure out what you want.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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unclearthur

121 posts in 1622 days


#4 posted 03-28-2017 09:52 PM



..... Besides, I have never built someone else s drawing exactly as they designed it. I always change it, sometimes significantly, then work from my modified design.
- jdmaher

Curious, when you do this (modify someone else’s design in Sketchup) do you start again from scratch in Sketchup using their design as a guide or do you modify their actual file/model by editing components, etc? I like sketchup, but I’ve found that going back and changing something (e.g. a dimension) is often not very easy (but easier of course than changing it in wood).

@jbay
OK I get that. I did run into an interesting FW article which also has some plugins to explode a view, but I haven’t tried those yet.

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jbay

1852 posts in 733 days


#5 posted 03-28-2017 09:57 PM

@jbay
OK I get that. I did run into an interesting FW article which also has some plugins to explode a view, but I haven t tried those yet.

- unclearthur


Dave Richard was very instrumental at teaching me sketchup.
I would rest assured using any of his methods or recommendations.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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jdmaher

417 posts in 2413 days


#6 posted 03-28-2017 11:24 PM

When I change a drawing done by someone else, I save the original sketchup file and make changes directly in a copy of the drawing file. This usually works.

Let’s say I get a drawing of a simple couch table with four square legs and a rectilinear top. But I need it 2 inches taller and 6 inches wider. I’ll edit one leg component, use push/pull to lengthen it by 2 inches. If I got a good drawing, all 4 legs are the same component and the table is now 2 inches taller. To increase the width, I’d move two legs and an end apron 24” out of the way, and edit the front apron, using push/pull to extend it by 6 inches. On a good drawing, the back apron is the same component, so both are done. I move the legs and side apron back 18”. The top is another push/pull exercise.

It’s an overly simple example, but for me that’s about 60 seconds of work (I’m slow).

Often, I’ll try to start out that way and find out that I have a BAD drawing. No components (or even groups). No joinery details. Drawing artifacts all over. If I absolutely HAD to have that design, I’d probably just use the drawing I got as an inspiration and start over from scratch.

Sketchup does take time to do; especially, time to learn. But it saves me time in the shop. More importantly, it help me avoid wasting the precious wood or creating a monstrosity. I’ve wasted wood and I’ve created some really ugly stuff, but that distresses me so much that I contemplate quitting the hobby. I try not to do that. For me, its better to waste time and electrons doing a Sketchup drawing.

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

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Andybb

546 posts in 437 days


#7 posted 03-29-2017 01:45 AM

Damn it! You guys are going to make me learn Sketchup. This is gonna be just like when I learned Photoshop. The learning curve seems to get steeper the older I get. But I can see that the effort is worth it. But it’s gonna take so long to get good at it. Looking at the file I posted above that must have taken untold hours to create.

So, what/where is the best tutorial for woodworkers since the legendary Dave is no longer with us?

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

View unclearthur's profile

unclearthur

121 posts in 1622 days


#8 posted 03-29-2017 04:06 AM



Damn it! You guys are going to make me learn Sketchup. This is gonna be just like when I learned Photoshop. The learning curve seems to get steeper the older I get. But I can see that the effort is worth it. But it s gonna take so long to get good at it. Looking at the file I posted above that must have taken untold hours to create.

So, what/where is the best tutorial for woodworkers since the legendary Dave is no longer with us?

- Andybb

I did some of these tutorials when I first started using Sketchup, helped me.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

3115 posts in 3065 days


#9 posted 03-29-2017 04:41 AM

I have learned Sketchup well enough so that I draw my projects first. Seems to work a lot better than the old sketch pad …and eraser! :-)

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View BobLang's profile

BobLang

148 posts in 3234 days


#10 posted 03-29-2017 01:28 PM

When I was working for Popular Woodworking Magazine we started putting projects online in the 3D Warehouse. We thought that the models were actually more useful without dimensions and exploded views. If the model is organized so that everything that is a distinct piece of wood in real life is a component in SketchUp, it is easy to use the Move tool to make an exploded view, or to modify the project to suit your needs.

Here is a blog post on my site about using models from the 3D Warehouse without much SketchUp experience.

While there is a plug in to generate exploded views automatically, it is more art than science. This post explains how to do it with the Move tool.

There are several other free tutorials here.

-- Bob Lang, https://readwatchdo.com

View DDWW's profile

DDWW

64 posts in 460 days


#11 posted 03-29-2017 03:21 PM

I’m in the process of learning and find the youtube tutorials by woodworkers really help to learn it.
There are several different people that have videos, just search sketch up and woodworker and you’ll have your pick.


Damn it! You guys are going to make me learn Sketchup. This is gonna be just like when I learned Photoshop. The learning curve seems to get steeper the older I get. But I can see that the effort is worth it. But it s gonna take so long to get good at it. Looking at the file I posted above that must have taken untold hours to create.

So, what/where is the best tutorial for woodworkers since the legendary Dave is no longer with us?

- Andybb

View dschlic1's profile

dschlic1

394 posts in 1803 days


#12 posted 03-29-2017 05:22 PM

There is a Sketchup plugin called Comp2LayerScene. This plugin will allow you to select a component on the main drawing, and then create a new scene with ortho views of just that component. I use it all the time. I then dimension the ortho views for cutting.

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MT_Stringer

3115 posts in 3065 days


#13 posted 03-29-2017 08:15 PM

I purchased Bob’s DVD. It was a big help. And Rob Cameron’s Sketchup for Woodworkers series on You Tube, as mentioned earlier.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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