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Considering 3/4" Laguna Resaw King Blade

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Forum topic by Rich posted 03-27-2017 07:13 PM 491 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


03-27-2017 07:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I have a 1950’s vintage bandsaw made by Atlas Press Co in Kalamazoo, MI. My dad bought it and it was the first power cutting tool I got to use back in the early ‘60s.

I have it tuned up very well. I’ve upgraded the old Westinghouse 1/4 hp motor to a 3/4 hp Dayton. I use it almost exclusively for resawing. I’d considered a post extension to boost the 6” resaw capacity, but decided against it, mainly because I don’t think the 3/4 hp motor can keep up.

What I’m considering now to improve the resaw results is a 3/4” Laguna carbide tipped resaw blade. I’ve gone over every inch of the saw and it appears that the blade will fit, even though 1/2” is generally considered the max for this saw. I have the 1/8” of space I need to get the guides moved back to allow for the extra blade width after centering it on the tire.

Am I missing something that would make this blade not work?

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.


6 replies so far

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AHuxley

652 posts in 3161 days


#1 posted 03-27-2017 08:12 PM

The largest Atlas bandsaws I have ever seen were 12”.

The problem is if it is indeed a 10 or 12” saw it won’t have near the ability to tension a 3/4” carbide blade properly they need at least 25,000 psi and prefer closer to 30K.

For those small saws one of the impluse hardened spring steel blades is the best choice for resawing dry wood. Highland, Iturra and Spectrum Supply all sell the same bladestock called the Woodslicer, Band Runner and Kerfmaster in order, I also listed them from highest price to lowest price. These blades have virtually no set and while they will not work well for green wood or even sweeping curves they leave a finish nearly as good as a carbide blade, the drawback being they dull quickly. The also have a very thin kerf which helps with a low powered saw like yours. Go with the 1/2” version.

If the saw is bigger than 12” try to find a model number so people can get a handle on what saw it actually is.

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Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#2 posted 03-27-2017 09:15 PM

It is the Atlas model 912. You are correct that it is a 12” saw. I upgraded the spring to one that allows me to get much greater tension on the blade. The old one I could compress almost 1/8” with my thumb and index finger. This one is many times stiffer.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Bill White's profile (online now)

Bill White

4807 posts in 3799 days


#3 posted 03-27-2017 09:21 PM

I would not use that blade on the saw. Too much for too little results. 1/2” tops.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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MrUnix

6012 posts in 2038 days


#4 posted 03-27-2017 09:40 PM

I upgraded the spring to one that allows me to get much greater tension on the blade. The old one I could compress almost 1/8” with my thumb and index finger. This one is many times stiffer.
- RichTaylor

Unless the old spring was bottoming out, replacing it with a stronger one did absolutely nothing. It’s your saw, but if you try to use that 3/4” blade, I’m betting you will be looking for either replacement parts, or a new saw in pretty short order. Even a half inch blade, which was the widest one sold by Atlas for that saw, would be pushing the limits IMO.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Rich

1984 posts in 428 days


#5 posted 03-27-2017 09:53 PM

The old spring was bottoming out. Thanks for the feedback. You all convinced me it was not a good idea. I think I’ll try one of the better 1/2” resaw blades AHuxley suggested.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

652 posts in 3161 days


#6 posted 03-28-2017 12:56 AM

Carbide tipped blades are all kinds of wrong for that saw in multiple ways. The hardened spring steel blades are the way to go but even then you will be well under ideal tensions but they are REALLY sharp and will help balance the low horsepower.

That saw was probably never designed to run anything larger than a 3/8” blade. I would be willing to bet that saw won’t be able to get more than 6k PSI on a even those very thin 1/2” blades (honestly more like 5K) you can’t get much more than 8-9k psi with a 14” Delta (or the clones) maybe around 12K with an aftermarket spring but you are risking bending the upper wheel support hinge. Even carbon and spring steel blades cut best with 15k psi. The Delta 14” saw were really designed for use with a 1/4” blade over 80 years ago as a small saw to compliment much larger saws in industry, hobbyists didn’t own “huge” 14” saws in the 30s and 40s. We have ask them to do more and more over the years and finally the industry is supplying small saws with rigid spines to do the “ridiculous” things hobbyists are asking of them.

BTW those little Atlas saws are really cool, will make an excellent second saw if you ever get a bigger one. Also if keep the little 1/4 hp motor if you haven’t tossed it while I assume you will never sell it since it was your fathers but if you do the buyer may well want the original motor even though it would have been purchased sans motor it would still be period correct.

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