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Forum topic by Karda posted 03-26-2017 04:33 AM 594 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

829 posts in 394 days


03-26-2017 04:33 AM

More question, I glued together 2 2×4s to practice turning on, is there a way to trim the corners to round it some, other than a hatchet. Im thinking on the table saw. My band saw doesn’t have the height of cut’

can you use B I N primmer or kiltz to seal end grain on green set aside ti dry


13 replies so far

View mrg's profile

mrg

786 posts in 2839 days


#1 posted 03-26-2017 11:40 AM

You could knock the edges down on the table saw or bandsaw. How small is your bandsaw?

-- mrg

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2188 posts in 1975 days


#2 posted 03-26-2017 12:20 PM

I would use the table saw to make your 2×4 square then just turn round on the lathe. Have no idea what BIN primers is but Kiltz paint would work for awhile as an end sealer on wet wood.

-- Bill

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1688 posts in 2699 days


#3 posted 03-26-2017 02:37 PM

You need to tilt the table saw blade to 45 degree angle and set up rip fence. Assuming blade tilts to the left, put the fence on the right hand side, located 2/3 of thickness of the stock away from where blade emerges from throat plate.

Please note that the blank needs to start up as a square. Since a 2×4 is not truly 2 by 4 inches, if you merely glued two together it would not be square, instead it would be 3 inches thick by 3 1/2 inches wide. Trim the 2×4s to 3 inches wide before glue up (take even amount of each side to eliminate the round over on the edges…

Be sure to mark your center location on each end before ripping the corners of to make the octagon…

Good Luck!

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Jimbo4's profile

Jimbo4

1578 posts in 2603 days


#4 posted 03-26-2017 04:14 PM

Why don’t you just use the spindle roughing gouge to make it round on the lathe ?

-- When I was a kid I wanted to be older . . . . . this CRAP is not what I expected !

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6017 posts in 2039 days


#5 posted 03-26-2017 04:21 PM

Glue ‘em up and turn ‘em… while being more or less round to start does make it a bit easier, it is not a requirement.
Here is a perfect example of just turning a plain 2×4 as is: Turn a car from a 2x4
(skip to about 6 min. to see the actual turning if you want to skip the intro)

As for sealing end grain… pretty much anything is better than nothing… BIN and Kilz will work, as will old latex or oil based paint, spray paint, wax, or any number of speciality sealers. I keep a can of old latex paint just for that purpose, and you can get the stuff for free in many places at the local recycling center. Anything to slow the release of moisture.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Karda's profile

Karda

829 posts in 394 days


#6 posted 03-26-2017 05:28 PM



You could knock the edges down on the table saw or bandsaw. How small is your bandsaw?
My band saw is a cheap craftsman three wheel the exact blade clearance is 3” no a foot like the ones in the utubes

- mrg


View Karda's profile

Karda

829 posts in 394 days


#7 posted 03-26-2017 05:31 PM

BIN is a alcohol based fire sealer designed to seal out stains before painting. I didn’t know you can turn something like a 2×4 I thought your stock had to be some what squarish or round.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6017 posts in 2039 days


#8 posted 03-26-2017 05:43 PM

I thought your stock had to be some what squarish or round.
- Karda

Then you would never be able to do stuff like winged bowls, live edges or turn gnarly root balls :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

5334 posts in 3503 days


#9 posted 03-26-2017 06:58 PM

I didn’t know you can turn something like a 2×4 I thought your stock had to be some what squarish or round.

Captain Eddie once told us … ”If you can hold it on the lathe, you can turn it.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

462 posts in 1141 days


#10 posted 03-26-2017 07:56 PM

If your band saw table tilts you may be able to take off about an inch diagonal from each corner. Not round but a octagon is lot closer.
It doesn’t have to be round but the closer it is the less both you and the lathe shakes. :)

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Karda's profile

Karda

829 posts in 394 days


#11 posted 03-26-2017 08:18 PM

that is a unique bowl Brad. I understand what mean about being able to do bowels and such but people who do things like that are experts I am still getting to know the tools.

View Ted78's profile

Ted78

326 posts in 1840 days


#12 posted 03-26-2017 08:25 PM

Another option is a drawknife. Draw two lines along the length of all four sides dividing the width into thirds. A pair a calipers, a compass or a marking gauge, even a combination square and a pencil all work well for this, then pare off each corner close to the line and you get an octagon. Or use a compass and draw the largest circle that will fit on the end grain, then set the table saw blade at 45 degrees and set the fence to just leave the line of the circle. and knock off the four corners that way. It could be done on a jointer as well, but that would probably take longer than just turning it down from square.

-- Ted

View Karda's profile

Karda

829 posts in 394 days


#13 posted 03-26-2017 08:33 PM

ok I’ll just turn it down, the lathe instructions said to trimm, so much for instructions

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