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Forum topic by Eric Vossbrink posted 10-20-2010 06:13 PM 1285 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Eric Vossbrink

70 posts in 3213 days


10-20-2010 06:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw milling shaping

a day or so ago I posted a for pre-carving a ukulele heel on the table saw on a ukulele forum. I called it bilateral table sawing due to the face that I mounted my cross cut sled to the table saw and laterally pushed the neck on edge thru the blade starting with the blade low on the table and raising it after passing both sides over to nibble away at the material until I got to the desired result. I also know that I did NOT invent this technique amd I’ve been doing it for years on a number of applications.

Well a storm of safety issues came up, and this may only be my damaged emotions talking here, but you would have though that I suggested that you set the blade height by running a cute bunny rabbet through the saw first

so I’ll pose this question to the gallery

Have you ever done this with your tablesaw?

you can check out the original thread here

-- http://www.newwaveukulele.com


20 replies so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

16242 posts in 3681 days


#1 posted 10-20-2010 06:27 PM

While I admit I am not 100% clear on exactly what you are doing, judging from the photos and your description nothing jumps out at me as being dangerous.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View lew's profile

lew

11339 posts in 3218 days


#2 posted 10-20-2010 06:31 PM

Very similar to making cove molding on the table saw.

The only difference I see is that when making the molding, you pass the wood diagonally across the blade. The diagonal pass probably puts less sideward pressure on the blade/bearings/arbor of the saw.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Bradford's profile

Bradford

1434 posts in 3286 days


#3 posted 10-20-2010 06:41 PM

It looks perfectly safe. I assume you use a stop block and clamp the piece to your sled.

-- so much wood, so little time. Bradford. Wood-a-holics unanimous president

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23157 posts in 2330 days


#4 posted 10-20-2010 06:50 PM

Instinctively I don’t think that I would do that because it just doesn’t seem like it would be good for the saw or the blade. As to safety, I just can’t think of anything to say. As to the arch molding method it has been proven a valid technique and the leading edge of the saw is cutting and the table is opposing the cut. However when you’re pushing a piece of wood into a saw blade side ways (if that’s what you are doing) then I don’t know – it doesn’t seem right and I wouldn’t do it.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Moron's profile

Moron

5032 posts in 3356 days


#5 posted 10-20-2010 06:50 PM

I do it all the time but you have one possible fatal accident in waiting.

You have the piece at the front of the blade and I did this for years and then one day it kicked back and sharpened my finger.

If you do the same thing at the back of the blade (opposite end) it wont kick back and even if it does, it will flick your hands away from the blade instead of over the blade.

2 cents

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4167 posts in 2319 days


#6 posted 10-20-2010 06:58 PM

Safer on the radial arm saw.
The bearings on a radial arm saw are designed for lateral strength ( so I was told by DeWalt many years ago).
I’ve done it on both table saw and radial arm though.

jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23157 posts in 2330 days


#7 posted 10-20-2010 07:00 PM

Why can’t you do the same thing by placing a stop on the table saw to stop the sled at the same place each time and quick clamp the part to the back board of the sled and slide the sled straight into the stop then pull back, slide the part over a little, clamp, and repeat the process. It would be slower but wouldn’t it be safer? I’ve never done it so I’m just asking.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3201 posts in 2301 days


#8 posted 10-20-2010 07:05 PM

And this is the sort of reason that I don’t play with big boy tools. ;)

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View Eric Vossbrink's profile

Eric Vossbrink

70 posts in 3213 days


#9 posted 10-20-2010 07:15 PM

I appreciate your input, but no one has answered the initial question yet:

Am I Crazy?

rivergirl - probably best

helluvawreck – doable, but would take forever. it took 10 minutes for me to profile 6 necks. probably the production woodworker in me.

alba - no radial arm saw in my shop.

Moron – (I cant believe that is your screen name) – approaching if from the back side sounds a little crazy to me, but we all have our ways.

-- http://www.newwaveukulele.com

View rance's profile

rance

4245 posts in 2623 days


#10 posted 10-20-2010 07:15 PM

No more unsafe than cutting cove molding on a TS. Forge ahead! Oh, and I think I’ll try that bunny rabbit method of setting the blade height. Thanks for the tip. :D

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Eric Vossbrink's profile

Eric Vossbrink

70 posts in 3213 days


#11 posted 10-20-2010 07:25 PM

if you run out of bunnies, you can always use kittens… 8^O

-- http://www.newwaveukulele.com

View mtnwild's profile

mtnwild

3474 posts in 2990 days


#12 posted 10-20-2010 07:27 PM

I’ve never cut that at a 90 degree. I’ve done a few at angle and see no problem. It’s an old technic.

-- mtnwild (Jack), It's not what you see, it's how you see it.

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4167 posts in 2319 days


#13 posted 10-20-2010 09:55 PM

It is as safe as you make it.

Crazy? NO!

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 2386 days


#14 posted 10-20-2010 10:16 PM

Frankly I see nothing wrong with the way you’re doing it. JMHO
Oh, you’re probably not any crazier than the rest of us here.

-- Life is good.

View Moron's profile

Moron

5032 posts in 3356 days


#15 posted 10-21-2010 12:40 AM

Ive got over 30 years behind a table saw and feel compelled to repeat what I said the first time.

The way you are doing it is dangerous. The blade is always going to be “pulling” the work away from the forward fence.

If it was at the fence behind, the bade would always be pushing it “against the fence”.

I’ve had 3 table saw accidents so far, all three happened in manner similar to what you are doing. I have since, always put the fence behind the piece, working the back of the blade.

Cheers

and no…......your not crazy

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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