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Blown Capacitor

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Forum topic by Breeze73 posted 03-25-2017 01:42 PM 516 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Breeze73

23 posts in 518 days


03-25-2017 01:42 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question dust collector wiring 220v blown capacitor

I purchased a Grizzly G0703 dust collector a little over a year ago. It’s been a great addition to my garage workshop. However over the last few months its been very temperamental in starting. Initially, it was fine starting up. But lately it began tripping the circuit breaker more and more. I knew this may be an issue when I bought the DC, so I kept in mind that I may need to step up and run a 220v line into my garage. Earlier this week, it tripped the CB 3 times in a row. Being that the CB is down in the basement, it was kind of a PITA to continually go down and reset it. So, I got fed up, and decided to run a couple of 220 lines from the panel to my garage. It wasn’t a big deal as my basement is unfinished and the run was pretty short.

After running the wiring to the garage and re-wiring the DC with the 220v kit and rewiring the main lines inside the DC, it started right up. But after a few minutes of using it, I noticed a strange smell. There was no smoke and nothing felt overly warm. As I thought something may be wrong, I rechecked everything inside. Not seeing anything wrong or loose, I put it all back together. The DC still seems to run ok, but it takes much longer to get up to speed (approx 20 secs.). Once its at speed, it seems to run fine.

Overtime I tun it on I keep thinking this is abnormal. So, I started doing some research. And it had led me to the starting capacitor. Sure enough… it is blown. My question is this, did the change to 220v cause the cap to blow or was it likely already on its way and the 220v conversion just helped it finally let loose? Should I be concerned, or just replace the cap with a new one and not worry about it?

Breeze


15 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4805 posts in 3798 days


#1 posted 03-25-2017 01:51 PM

Caps pop. Don’t worry, be happy.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

976 posts in 429 days


#2 posted 03-25-2017 02:03 PM

Of course at 220V the capacitor is subjected to twice the stress than at 110V so if it was defective quite possibly the change caused it to fail completely.
I would not worry much, it costs $5 on ebay . Just make sure you replace the correct one. Your DC has two.

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knotscott

7787 posts in 3213 days


#3 posted 03-25-2017 02:05 PM

Most manufacturers source the cheapest Chinese caps they can these days. Its not likely anything you did, and its a fairly cheap easy fix.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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GR8HUNTER

2963 posts in 550 days


#4 posted 03-25-2017 02:15 PM

GRATZ …... you now have 220 in garage …..:<))

-- Tony Reinholds,Pa. REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Carloz

976 posts in 429 days


#5 posted 03-25-2017 02:17 PM


Most manufacturers source the cheapest Chinese caps they can these days. Its not likely anything you did, and its a fairly cheap easy fix.

- knotscott


You’d think so. A company here charges you $300+ if you ask them to replace the capacitor on the heater blower . For the work $200+ plus for the capacitor $100. I really do not know where they find those capacitors for $100 and how they justify $200 for an 1 minute job.

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Breeze73

23 posts in 518 days


#6 posted 03-25-2017 03:04 PM

Exactly what I was thinking. Thank you for the replies! I think I’ll replace the run capacitor while I’m at it. And yes, I’m happy to have 220v in my garage now. When I ran the 220v line, I decided to run two lines in order to allow me to upgrade to a SawStop soon! :)

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knotscott

7787 posts in 3213 days


#7 posted 03-25-2017 03:42 PM

Most manufacturers source the cheapest Chinese caps they can these days. Its not likely anything you did, and its a fairly cheap easy fix.

- knotscott

You d think so. A company here charges you $300+ if you ask them to replace the capacitor on the heater blower . For the work $200+ plus for the capacitor $100. I really do not know where they find those capacitors for $100 and how they justify $200 for an 1 minute job.

- Carloz

A little off topic, but I replaced one on our outdoor A/C compressor 3 years ago. The HVAC guy at work sourced the dual capacitor for $20 from a local wholesale supply house, and I installed it in under 10 minutes….really easy…just some screws and quick connect spades on the cap….pliers and screw driver was all it took. If I’d called a heating/AC company it would have around $50 for the part, $50-$100 for the house call, plus $50-$100 flat rate labor, plus sales tax on the whole profit scheme….easily $200 for that darn $20 cap! It’s crazy, but I know it’s not free to keep an equipped truck and trained technician on call.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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MrUnix

6002 posts in 2036 days


#8 posted 03-25-2017 05:07 PM

Should I be concerned, or just replace the cap with a new one and not worry about it?
- Breeze73

As already pointed out, those capacitors will eventually fail… but changing your motor from 120v to 240v won’t make it fail any faster – the capacitor will only see 120v either way, which is why you frequently find capacitors rated for 110-125V on motors that can be run on either 120 or 240.

Also, a capacitor rated for a higher voltage will last longer than one rated for a lower voltage. So for example, a capacitor rated for 330V will (should) last longer than one rated for 120V. You can always use a capacitor with a HIGHER voltage rating than what was in there, but never go lower.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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oldnovice

6430 posts in 3205 days


#9 posted 03-25-2017 08:14 PM

Ditto MrUnix!

In the 40+ years I have had my table saw I have had to replace the motor cap once … stuff happens that’s all there is to it!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Breeze73

23 posts in 518 days


#10 posted 03-25-2017 10:40 PM

Well I replaced the cap with a Dayton Elec cap. It’s a little larger in physical size, but I made it fit. Works like a champ and it starts up WAY faster. Faster than I think it did on 120v. Thanks everyone for your help. I was just a bit worried that I screwed something up since it’s only a year old.

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Breeze73

23 posts in 518 days


#11 posted 03-26-2017 10:54 PM

Ok, sooo… After about 4-5 hours of cumulative use, the capacitor blew again. This time it was a pretty loud bang and started smoking almost immediately. I’m going to call Grizzly in the morning, but does anyone have any thoughts on what might be causing this issue? I can hear the centrifugal switch disengaging when it gets to about 75%, but maybe it isn’t actually disengaging? The DC had been running only for about 45 secs when it blew. I’m getting a little frustrated with this thing.

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MrUnix

6002 posts in 2036 days


#12 posted 03-26-2017 11:45 PM

Check your centrifugal switch. Most have one internal to the motor, but on the asian motors that Grizzly and some other manufacturers use a lot these days, it can be accessed from the fan end without having to pull the motor completely apart.

Here is the replacement/adjustment procedure from Grizzly. Or watch the Grizzly video: How-To Troubleshoot a Motor and Adjust Centrifugal Switches

Could have also been a bad capacitor, which is not completely uncommon, particularly on those coming out of China. If you have the original capacitor, do a google search for the manufacturers part number stamped on the side. In most cases, you can get an exact replacement so you don’t have to struggle to make it fit.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Breeze73

23 posts in 518 days


#13 posted 03-26-2017 11:55 PM

I took apart the motor and looked the switch and contact plate. It seems to be operating normally. It does break the circuit when the switch is moved to the run position. And it does reconnect the circuit when put in the off position.

With this DC, you have to replace the board that controls all of the ancillary controls to allow it to run on 220v, as well as re-wire the motor appropriately. I am wondering if there is something amiss with this new board. I’m kind of stumped…

It seems to me that too much voltage is being sent to the capacitor, causing the failure. It could be just another bad capacitor, but I can’ seem to justify lightning striking twice within 2-days. The replacement was another 125v capacitor. I’m kind of thinking maybe stepping it up to a 220v capacitor. We’ll see what Grizzly says.

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Breeze73

23 posts in 518 days


#14 posted 03-27-2017 01:15 AM

I have also test the voltage going to the cap on start up. It rises to about 118v before the centrifugal switch cuts out, then it goes to about 25v after cutout. This seems 100% normal. The replacement cap is rated at 110-125v. So I’m not quite sure what to think. Maybe you’re right and it is just another bad cap. I’m leaning toward putting in a 220v and be done with it.

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Breeze73

23 posts in 518 days


#15 posted 03-27-2017 04:11 PM

After speaking with Grizzly this morning, it appears that the centrifugal cutout switch is the culprit. On the switch plate, I do not have a contact point on the spring end of the switch. After further inspection, the contact somehow broke free of the switch. I found it under the switch plate. There is evidence of arcing on the spring switch. I am speculating that since there is no contact point on the spring any longer that the electrical arc was not allowing the spring to disengage (small magnetic field or electrical surface tension?) and frying the capacitor. Here is the way it looks now.

So I ordered a new capacitor and a new switch plate. $20 repair. Hopefully this will fix my problems. I suspect it will. I just wanted to post my problems for anybody having a similar issue anytime down the line. Thank you all for your help and guidance.

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