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Forum topic by jeffswildwood posted 03-24-2017 08:51 PM 1389 views 0 times favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jeffswildwood

2557 posts in 1810 days


03-24-2017 08:51 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Twice now I have took an order from friends, ect, built the project after buying the wood and other attaching part, then let them know their item is ready. Can you wait two weeks? Me-uh sure, see you in two weeks. Two weeks later, can you wait til Friday?, Uh-see you Friday. Friday come, no word, calls or messages, and no money where I am out building it. Does this happen to you? What do you do, keep calling? I think in the future, I’ll let them know I am ready to start, bring me half the fee and I’ll begin. I’m not a pro, just a hobbyist and make very little off my projects. I do this to keep busy and do wood work. If I make some extra, fine, I can buy some sandpaper or some more wood for the next project. I think it’s time to change. Maybe just build for me or for gifts.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".


34 replies so far

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2607 posts in 2129 days


#1 posted 03-24-2017 08:55 PM

Get money for materials plus a cushion up front. Make item. If said ‘friend’ doesn’t pick up item sell it for whatever you can. Subtract what they gave you and stick it in a coffee can. If they eventually show up give them their money back. Find new friends.

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

477 posts in 1302 days


#2 posted 03-24-2017 09:02 PM

There are sale agreement forms you can find online, or you can write up very simple sales agreement with straightforward language, that spells out what happens if they never retrieve their item. I agree with dhazelton; Always get at least the materials cost up-front. What if they want you to use some species or material that you’d never normally use for other projects? etc.

If you special order a door from home depot, for example, and don’t pick it up, they will make all reasonable attempts to contact you to have you pick it up but I think after like 60 days you are legally forfeiting all claim to the item and they don’t owe you anything back.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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jeffswildwood

2557 posts in 1810 days


#3 posted 03-24-2017 09:03 PM

Good advice dhazelton, but I do want to keep my friends. Don’t want my woodworking passion to come between us. I like the coffee can part.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

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jeffswildwood

2557 posts in 1810 days


#4 posted 03-24-2017 09:05 PM

99.9 of my orders are from friends. I use a hand shake. (Old school). But half up front sounds better.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

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jeffswildwood

2557 posts in 1810 days


#5 posted 03-24-2017 09:10 PM

I think no more orders or requests, concentrate on an up coming craft fair (local) and if nothing else, my Wife has a long “wish list” of things she wants me to build. Do wood working for me.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View Karda's profile

Karda

807 posts in 386 days


#6 posted 03-24-2017 09:11 PM

half up front sounds reasonable even for friends unless there are other forms of payback. But you should get materials money

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2607 posts in 2129 days


#7 posted 03-24-2017 09:22 PM

You don’t want woodworking to come between you and your friends but it already has and it’s frustrating. They should have more respect for your time if they are good friends.

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

3689 posts in 2099 days


#8 posted 03-24-2017 09:24 PM

I have been very seldom burned. But, I do not do large projects either.

On any special that I will have just more than a fewbucks into; I will ask for a deposit at least or 1/2 of the material before I will strt the project.

-- SAWDUST is THERAPY without a couch! just rjR

View KelleyCrafts's profile

KelleyCrafts

2679 posts in 572 days


#9 posted 03-24-2017 09:24 PM

Jeff, being recently retired you should definitely do whatever YOU want to do in the shop. If someone comes up with something for you and you can make a few bucks for shop supplies then great. Otherwise just pass on taking on jobs.

With friends I usually just do material costs up front so I’m guaranteed not out anything. Sure there’s the time thing but I also only take on stuff I actually would enjoy building since it’s not a business unless it’s the wife making requests. If you aren’t making money then you better enjoy the build.

-- http://kelleycrafts.com/ - pen blanks - knife scales - turning tools

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10598 posts in 2212 days


#10 posted 03-24-2017 09:36 PM

When you go into business you’ll realize that friends and family will screw you quicker than a stranger, or at least more willing to waste your time. When family ask me to build them something I tell them to buy the wood and we’ll pick it up together, that usually puts the kibosh on things if they aren’t sincere.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

470 posts in 383 days


#11 posted 03-24-2017 09:42 PM

Half up front sounds good so at least ur covered on ur costs. If they r big items u might specify in the beginning that due to space they can’t stay long after completion or factor in gas on the price An deliver it with the understanding they pay the last portion at delivery.
I hav a mower for sale once. My buddy wanted it an I agreed to allow him to make payments over the next month or two. Took my 18months to get my money on a $1000 mower. We r still friends but I’ll never do that again Business and friends can last but there’s a lot of opportunities to make an enemy with it

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

2557 posts in 1810 days


#12 posted 03-24-2017 09:45 PM

Ralbuck, my projects are small also. I will save it for the craft fair. ki7hy, best advice I can think of. Do what I want to do! Enjoy the build.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4407 posts in 3575 days


#13 posted 03-24-2017 09:45 PM

Good advice regarding selling, and getting money up front for materials.

That makes sure that you aren’t out cash (JUST Time) which has value also

I would always get materials paid for…

More up front payment to me would depend on whether the project is something I really could sell if it is REALLY specific to them. + how much time commitment is it.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View ric53's profile

ric53

192 posts in 1352 days


#14 posted 03-24-2017 09:59 PM

I always get a signed proposal which includes a drawing and it is stated in the proposal that a 50% nonrefundable deposit is due before their work can be scheduled. I require this even with friends. I have not lost any money or friends with this approach. Remember there are no friends in business, just customers.

-- Ric, Mazomanie

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

2887 posts in 1821 days


#15 posted 03-24-2017 10:20 PM

I would get half up front or at least enough to cover the materials. Most people have no idea the cost of wood and hardware and even the cost of finishing.

Good luck…

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