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Recommendation for beginning sharpening set

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Forum topic by BenDupre posted 03-24-2017 02:26 PM 3141 views 1 time favorited 42 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BenDupre

528 posts in 304 days


03-24-2017 02:26 PM

Topic tags/keywords: sharpening

Can i have your reccommendation (with links if pissible) for a good set of sharpening stones or diamond plates to do chisels, plane irons, and some chip carving knives. I have no idea what the investment would be. I want something that is easy and reliable, but then cheap. Not cheap and unreliable or cheap an not easy you get my drift? The $7 combination stone i bought at harbor freight isn’t working for me. I spen $30 on a fine diamond plate but it is really small and hard to lap on. It wont hold still.

Also love to have any helpful pointers and hear opinions of which types are preferred and why.

Thanks Jocks
Ben

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw


42 replies so far

View MikeUT's profile

MikeUT

164 posts in 1176 days


#1 posted 03-24-2017 03:30 PM

I guess I’m a sandpaper man. I got a cheap set of diamond stones but switched over to the scary sharp method because my diamond stone wasn’t wide enough to sharpen my planes. I guess the costs can add up over time because you have to keep buying the paper but it is a great way to get in to it. After I used the scary sharp method for a while I upgraded to a Worksharp, which is also sandpaper but a little faster.

View Slider20's profile

Slider20

117 posts in 338 days


#2 posted 03-24-2017 03:39 PM

I like Diamond Stones, the DMT Fine is pretty coarse, but it will take allot of time flatten a chisel or reshape a plane iron, the extra fine will get you most of the way there, and a strop with honing compound should finish off the job.

This DMT Fine/Extra fine is a good Starter stone, pick up a Strop, and get a DMT Course stone if you find the fine to take too long.

https://www.amazon.com/DMT-WM8EF-WB-8-Inch-DuoSharp-Bench/dp/B000H6L6FA/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1490369706&sr=8-3&keywords=dmt+bench+stone

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BenDupre

528 posts in 304 days


#3 posted 03-24-2017 03:50 PM

Mike thanks what do i get for a surface? Is a granite tile from home depot flat enough? Im not sure i know what float glass is. What about MDF? Do i use spray adhesive? If so, how do i change abrasive?

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

View eflanders's profile

eflanders

216 posts in 1667 days


#4 posted 03-24-2017 03:58 PM

The least expensive initially and effective methods is the scary-sharp method mentioned above. Get a glass plate, a decent sharpening jig (Veritas mkII) and 4 grits of sandpaper and you can do all that you want. The jig recommended makes things almost foolproof. However in the long run, I think that diamond plates are the best for the initial coarse and then polish with a hard Arkansas oil stone and strop. The Atoma brand diamond plates IME are the best and they too can be gotten at Lee Valley / Veritas.

View RichCMD's profile

RichCMD

390 posts in 1757 days


#5 posted 03-24-2017 04:04 PM

Wow! This is almost like asking what religion you should practice or whether your should buy an Apple or Windows computer. The are believers in all camps, and many of them are strongly committed to their choice. Like many things, it seems to be a matter of personal preference and what works best for you. I was fortunate in having access to a class that had all the different choices (sand paper, wet stones, oil stones, ceramic, diamond, Worksharp, etc.) that we could take for a test drive.

Most of my sharpening is for turning tools, which is a whole different topic. For other tools, I seem to have followed the same path as MikeUT, scary sharp and then Worksharp. I have a friend that went one step further and moved up to a Tormek, but that is really getting pricey. At the moment, I use the Worksharp mostly for its speed and convenience. If I wanted something really, really sharp I’d probably use the scary sharp method.

-- Ride the bevel!

View mummykicks's profile

mummykicks

108 posts in 1619 days


#6 posted 03-24-2017 06:56 PM

Watch Paul seller’s youtube vids. on sharpening, and the one where he compares 400 vs 1200 etc..
I use this to sharpen:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-Oscillating-Edge-Belt-Spindle-Sander-EB4424/100061671

I bought 250, 400, 600 and 1000 grit belts.
It’s basically a powered version of scary sharp system, or a worksharp alternative.

I would say 400 and 1K would be the bare minimum. Takes very little time and uses a tool I already have and the belts just become finer grit with use. My 1K is probably 1500 now. They don’t get chewed up the way the scary sharp ones do, and last a very, very long time. I do the ‘rounded’ bevel that Paul sellers does by hand.

Takes some practice, but once you get the feel it’s quick and easy, I can get it more than sharp enough for my needs, which is an edge sharp enough to shave with. I was going to build a jig but got good enough results by hand that I really didn’t need it.

People go nuts over sharpening, and I thought I needed all kinds of stones and rouge and everything else until I read a research paper (measurements, not opinion) that basically concluded 1K-1200 is about as fine as you need because finer edges dull so quick the benefit is marginal. You end up with a 1K edge after very little use.

Pual sellers claims 400 is good enough, given that they sand to 250 for finishing.

Hand tool types get all religious about a piece of metal with an edge on it. If you screw it up you can sharpen it some more and fix it. Get some cheap chisels from HD or some such and practice on them, the only difference is they will lose their edge a bit quicker, but if you have a quick and easy sharpening system that really won’t matter.

At the end of the day:

Paul sellers with tools sharpened to 400 will still do better joinery than 99% of the rest of us with ones sharpened to 30K…

View BenDupre's profile

BenDupre

528 posts in 304 days


#7 posted 03-24-2017 08:25 PM

I have the belt sander. Who do you buy belts from? HD only carries 120 grit and below from what i can tell.

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

3341 posts in 3000 days


#8 posted 03-24-2017 08:30 PM

If I were doing it now, I would buy all diamond stones except for the final honing stone. For that, a shapton or sigma water stone at the highest grit you can afford is best.

-- Allen, Colorado (Instagram @bobasaurus_woodworking)

View Rrrandy's profile

Rrrandy

212 posts in 295 days


#9 posted 03-24-2017 08:39 PM

I’m a sandpaper kind of guy…

-- Y'all need to locate a sense of humor. Borrow one if you can't find yours...

View LDO2802's profile

LDO2802

120 posts in 247 days


#10 posted 03-24-2017 09:02 PM

I am new to this forum, but for the inability of the stone to stay still I recommend taking some plywood and creating a holder for it. That way you can clamp it to your workshop bench and go nuts. Eventually I would recommend a wetstone grinder with the tormec SP-650 to adjust the grit and then hone it with a nice glass plate before polishing and stroping.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4789 posts in 3777 days


#11 posted 03-24-2017 09:55 PM

Don’t confuse “cheap” with effective.
There are a zillion sharpening methods, but “cheap” isn’t one of the choices.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8161 posts in 1302 days


#12 posted 03-24-2017 10:49 PM



Watch Paul seller s youtube vids. on sharpening, and the one where he compares 400 vs 1200 etc..
I use this to sharpen:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-Oscillating-Edge-Belt-Spindle-Sander-EB4424/100061671

I bought 250, 400, 600 and 1000 grit belts.
It s basically a powered version of scary sharp system, or a worksharp alternative.

I would say 400 and 1K would be the bare minimum. Takes very little time and uses a tool I already have and the belts just become finer grit with use. My 1K is probably 1500 now. They don t get chewed up the way the scary sharp ones do, and last a very, very long time. I do the rounded bevel that Paul sellers does by hand.

Takes some practice, but once you get the feel it s quick and easy, I can get it more than sharp enough for my needs, which is an edge sharp enough to shave with. I was going to build a jig but got good enough results by hand that I really didn t need it.

People go nuts over sharpening, and I thought I needed all kinds of stones and rouge and everything else until I read a research paper (measurements, not opinion) that basically concluded 1K-1200 is about as fine as you need because finer edges dull so quick the benefit is marginal. You end up with a 1K edge after very little use.

Pual sellers claims 400 is good enough, given that they sand to 250 for finishing.

If you screw it up you can sharpen it some more and fix it.

At the end of the day:

Paul sellers with tools sharpened to 400 will still do better joinery than 99% of the rest of us with ones sharpened to 30K..

- mummykicks

Polishing wood and metal are 2 way different things. 1000k in paper is wayyyy finer than a diamond stone. If you mess up lapping an A2 chisel you will regret it. If you mess up sharpening it, it’s may not be a quick fix without a grinder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View BenDupre's profile

BenDupre

528 posts in 304 days


#13 posted 03-25-2017 03:30 AM

Thanks for the advice. Today on the way home from work i bought a marble tile and some wet dry paper. I still spent $40. if i cant make that work i will consider some DMT plates.

-- The problem with communication is the illusion that it has occurred. – George Bernard Shaw

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8161 posts in 1302 days


#14 posted 03-25-2017 04:02 AM

Granite sink cutouts are awesome as well.

For honing. Paper will go a long way. I kept a plastic container over my setup to keep the dust out. I threw more paper away because of dust than use.

For refurbing. Paper can get used up quick.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View them700project's profile

them700project

115 posts in 835 days


#15 posted 03-25-2017 11:19 AM

a lot of ways to skin this cat

I bought dmt duosharps which gets you to 1200 grit and i went with films out to .3 micron

Ive since bought a couple naniwa chosera stones 1000,3000 which make a better transition for me to starting films

showing 1 through 15 of 42 replies

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