LumberJocks

Fixing/hiding a crack??

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Belg1960 posted 03-23-2017 04:19 PM 1293 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2898 days


03-23-2017 04:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Guys, I have a medicine cabinet that has a beveled glass mirror imbedded into the frame with no way to remove it. I want to inlay/fix this somehow so it won’t be seen the crack is about 5/8” in the corner. I’m showing a corner piece I’m playing with but it will not work as the handle on the opposing side will be affected. And inlaying with the curves will be a tough job with the mirror in place. Any thoughts??

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!


15 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116559 posts in 3410 days


#1 posted 03-23-2017 04:43 PM

Hi pat
your idea might work but I would be concerned that the cracks will extended outward in time due to using the door or wood movement. in other material, you can stop cracks by drilling a small hole at the end of the cracks but I’m not sure you can do that on glass.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116559 posts in 3410 days


#2 posted 03-23-2017 04:58 PM

Another idea is to make an inside the frame trim that goes all the way around the Mirror,

This kind of idea

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2898 days


#3 posted 03-23-2017 10:32 PM

Jim, I like the second idea but unfortunately I don’t have the depth to make it work. I’m going to have to recess the solution in the frame of the door somehow.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2898 days


#4 posted 03-26-2017 11:48 AM

Bump, any ideas would be appreciated.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116559 posts in 3410 days


#5 posted 03-26-2017 03:00 PM

Pat If you used thinner material say 1/4” would it work?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

382 posts in 1295 days


#6 posted 03-26-2017 04:15 PM

If you could get the glass out, could you replace it? Match it? If so, go ahead and break the glass. Get it out of the way. Open the grove on the back side with a router so that the new glass panel will fit. There are many ways to fit the new panel from buying clips, to cutting strips of wood to wedge in the groove.
The links below are just a couple ideas.
http://www.leevalley.com/us/hardware/page.aspx?p=50400&cat=3,40914,50427
http://www.leevalley.com/us/hardware/page.aspx?p=41859&cat=3,40914,50427

-- John

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2898 days


#7 posted 03-27-2017 10:43 AM

Jim, the flat part of the mirror is only about an 1/8” below the face frame.

John, I was hoping to avoid this and also the rear side has a beaded panel over it. So whatever I do will have to be done from the front. Thanks for those links I will definitely keep that in mind for the future.

I did add some 1/4” tubing sections as spacers around the mirror so I think someone must have hit it or kicked it by accident.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2898 days


#8 posted 07-31-2017 11:26 AM

Guys, this is the solution I came up with!! The client loved it. Sorry for the crappy pic. I used the pattern from the decorated door to replicate an inset piece, made a template for a pattern router bit routed ,glued and used some heavy duty two sided tape . It was a little delicate not to hit the high side of the mirror but got lucky. Thanks to all for your suggestions.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1171 posts in 1631 days


#9 posted 07-31-2017 01:09 PM

Bravo I Ilike it !

-- Aj

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

201 posts in 453 days


#10 posted 07-31-2017 01:32 PM

Very nice. It takes real skill to turn a flaw into a design feature.

-- Sawdust Maker

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116559 posts in 3410 days


#11 posted 07-31-2017 01:53 PM

ingenious idea but I’m concerned after some vibration the crack will migrate out beyond the patch.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

374 posts in 215 days


#12 posted 07-31-2017 02:47 PM

First, I would have gotten some of the resin that is used to repair car windshield cracks and injected that into the crack in the mirror. That would have stopped the crack from ever spreading outward.

Your cover-up looks great! Nice craftsmanship.

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2898 days


#13 posted 07-31-2017 07:32 PM

Guys, the crack already ran from corner to corner so I don’t think it will move any further. I appreciate the tip about the resin will tuck that into the memory for hopefully never having to use it again. ;-)

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

374 posts in 215 days


#14 posted 07-31-2017 11:11 PM

Dang man, sorry to hear that!


Guys, the crack already ran from corner to corner so I don t think it will move any further. I appreciate the tip about the resin will tuck that into the memory for hopefully never having to use it again. ;-)

- Belg1960


View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

1050 posts in 2898 days


#15 posted 08-01-2017 01:17 AM



Dang man, sorry to hear that!

Guys, the crack already ran from corner to corner so I don t think it will move any further. I appreciate the tip about the resin will tuck that into the memory for hopefully never having to use it again. ;-)

- Belg1960

- Gilley23


Gilley it’s just a small tiny corner like in the original picture in my first post. The medallion covers it very well.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com