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Cutting Metal with my Bandsaw

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Forum topic by TurbineTester posted 10-18-2010 07:05 PM 3033 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TurbineTester

197 posts in 2375 days


10-18-2010 07:05 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Ok i’ve got an older multi-speed Rockwell Delta bandsaw with multi step pulleys and an oiled gear box. I’m doing some investigation for a possible future project and i’d like to know how to go about cutting 1/8” Stainless Steel on my band saw. I would be taking sheet stock and cutting triangles. I would need to get straight lines and rounded corners on equilateral triangles, say 2-4 inches on a side. What kind of blade, TPI, cutting oil, speed etc. should i use to perform this task? Any suggestions or other methods i should look at?

Thanks

-- if you can't light a $100 bill on fire and watch it burn, you're in the wrong hobby.


26 replies so far

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poopiekat

4224 posts in 3196 days


#1 posted 10-18-2010 08:08 PM

yikes, i’ve cut 6061 aluminum with woodworking blades, but Stainless steel? Well, you should have 3 teeth engaged in the thickness, so I’d go for a minimum 24 tpi blade… if you can find one in a (assuming) 93 1/2 length. Starret or Lenox might manufacture such an item. Have you considered a chop saw, with an abrasive blade? That stainless is pretty tough stuff to chew through, and if you’re doing a lot of cuts it will be an eternity with WW tools.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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hairy

2384 posts in 2993 days


#2 posted 10-18-2010 08:51 PM

Here’s a manual for the old Delta Milwaukee wood / metal bandsaw. Lots of good info.

Grainger has blades.

-- stay thirsty my friends...

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TurbineTester

197 posts in 2375 days


#3 posted 10-18-2010 11:02 PM

Poopiekat –
I should have been more specific when i said it was multi speed. It is a Metal/Wood cutting bandsaw…

Hairy – thanks for the manual

rick
I only need about 6 of them. Lets say they were 4 inches on a side, if you had to just guess, what would you think a sheet metal shop would charge to make something like that, assuming they supplied the material as well?

Using an angle grinder would be a mess and would not yield the look and functionality i’m after. They need to be fairly precise, and i don’t think an angle grinder will do that. On the other hand, i think i could handle the bandsaw and figure out the feed rate before i hardened the blade.

-- if you can't light a $100 bill on fire and watch it burn, you're in the wrong hobby.

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TurbineTester

197 posts in 2375 days


#4 posted 10-19-2010 01:30 PM

What material does the blade need to be? Carbon steel, bi-metal, etc?

-- if you can't light a $100 bill on fire and watch it burn, you're in the wrong hobby.

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TurbineTester

197 posts in 2375 days


#5 posted 10-19-2010 04:13 PM

Wow, i had no idea they even made anything like that. Interesting…

I’m still not sure that it would work. I originally stated that they would be equilateral triangles, but i think thaey would actually be isosceles triangle, base about 5.04 inches and the length of the sides would be 5.84 inches. and the corners would then need to be rounded off to about .5” radius…with sides that long, would a 4 1/2” angles grinder in that seetup still be able to cut the sides in one pass, or would i have to cut it multiple times?

-- if you can't light a $100 bill on fire and watch it burn, you're in the wrong hobby.

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TurbineTester

197 posts in 2375 days


#6 posted 10-19-2010 10:53 PM

ummm…yeah…i’ve heard of it…

I’ve done it on my router table a lot actually. How would you go about pattern cutting stainless steel triangles? I’m assuming i don’t want to sacrifice the carbide on my table saw blade or my router bits, so i’m confused as to how you would pattern cut in this application???

-- if you can't light a $100 bill on fire and watch it burn, you're in the wrong hobby.

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TurbineTester

197 posts in 2375 days


#7 posted 10-20-2010 01:26 AM

I’m not sure i follow, i must be a little slow today :-)

What do you mean by clean out that table saw? Like buy a grinding cutoff wheel for the table saw? Please help i feel like your withholding valuable information and techniques form me :-)

Oh that’s what that mcmaster part number is, a cutoff wheel for 5/8” diameter arbor? so i could use it in my TS then. Ok so i make the pattern out of wood and then carpet tape the stainless to the bottom. Any irregularities in the corners i can always round off on the grinder. Nice, learn something new everyday! Thanks.

I’d still love to see you make 5” triangles in stainless with an angle grinder by hand ;)

Do you think i would need more than one of those cutoff wheels to do 6 triangles? Would i be better off with an 8” wheel, than a 7” wheel?

Thanks again.

-- if you can't light a $100 bill on fire and watch it burn, you're in the wrong hobby.

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Bob #2

3809 posts in 3483 days


#8 posted 10-20-2010 01:55 PM

Try one of these in your clean table saw.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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TurbineTester

197 posts in 2375 days


#9 posted 10-20-2010 03:51 PM

No i didn’t understand how to do that until i looked up pattern cutting on the table saw and saw a youtube video of it after you told me about it here. I’ve just never had a reason to pattern cut on my TS until now. I just did it on the router table. But seeing it done on teh table saw makes so much sense. Thanks for the tip.

Those cutoff wheels are pretty spectacular in that video Bob. I’m having some network trouble today, so i can’t see how much they are. Those 7” rick mentioned were about $5, how much are the zipcut wheels?

-- if you can't light a $100 bill on fire and watch it burn, you're in the wrong hobby.

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Bob #2

3809 posts in 3483 days


#10 posted 10-20-2010 04:39 PM

I pay about $7.00 for the 7 inch ones and the last a long time and really cut fast.
I have an old Beaver tablesaw with on mounted in it for just what you are doing.
If you use your wood TS make sure you remove all the sawdust and disconnect it temporialy from your dust collector. Wear safteyglasses and there is some spray off. If youkeep the disc low you wont need your fence as kickback is not a factor here.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 2568 days


#11 posted 10-20-2010 07:05 PM

Keep in mind that stainless will work harden very rapidly. When you cut or drill SS use slow speed and a quality cutting oil to reduce the heat factor. For this small amount a bi-metal blade may not be economical. The a non-ferrous abrasive wheel and a jig are probably your best bet.

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Bob #2

3809 posts in 3483 days


#12 posted 10-20-2010 07:30 PM

Another consideration is that metal filings will adhere to your bandsaw tires and hasten wear on them..
You will have a fairly annoying job cleaning up after a session with metal .
My 4×6 metal bandsaw has metal tires and it really gets gummed up with cutting oil and filings. I can imagine what the rubber tires would look like.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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TurbineTester

197 posts in 2375 days


#13 posted 12-02-2010 09:00 PM

ok rick3ddd, since you’re the “get the most out of your tools” guru, say i wanted to cut steel square tubing. not stainless but just regular 1/2” or 1” square tube. All i need are square cuts. I do have an angle grinder and a table saw. Would the angle grinder with a cutoff wheel still be your tool of choice?

-- if you can't light a $100 bill on fire and watch it burn, you're in the wrong hobby.

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Blakep

232 posts in 2264 days


#14 posted 12-02-2010 10:00 PM

Hey turbine tester, I would use a chop saw to cut the square tube. If you don’t own one then you can purchase a cheap 6” harbor freight one for like 35 bucks. It won’t handle big stuff but it will handle the tube that your talking about. You can make the cuts with the angle grinder but it will be prettey hard to keep them perfectly square by free handing them. You could always cut them with the grinder and just cut a little bit past the line and then grine it down to your lines with a regular grinding wheel. Personally I could get close with a torch but a grinder will be tough for a perfect freehand cut.

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TurbineTester

197 posts in 2375 days


#15 posted 12-02-2010 10:40 PM

this is the one your talking about?

http://www.harborfreight.com/6-inch-cut-off-saw-41453.html

-- if you can't light a $100 bill on fire and watch it burn, you're in the wrong hobby.

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