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What stove do you use to heat shop.

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Forum topic by BoxO posted 03-21-2017 01:46 PM 553 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BoxO

33 posts in 650 days


03-21-2017 01:46 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hey folks,
Looking for some advice from our cold weather wood folks. I am looking for a nice direct vent wood burning stove that I can use to heat my shop. Shop is 16×32 with 9’ ceilings sectioned to my garage. Insulated walls and ceiling. NO GAS in the home. I have been using electric heater and it is working ok. I would like to have the stove for heat and use up all my scraps doing so. If anyone has some ideas they would like to share, please do.

Thanks
Jim


14 replies so far

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2633 posts in 2006 days


#1 posted 03-21-2017 02:13 PM

I use an old wood pellet stove. Works great 16’x24’ 10’ ceilings.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#2 posted 03-21-2017 02:19 PM

This goes back quiet a few years, but I bought a direct vent Englander for my shop and used it for several years before switching to LP. It was an older catalytic converter model, but looked a lot like this one in the current catalog. Their products are extremely well made/high quality, and while I quit using that stove I still have it. Plans are to hook up in the current building in the storage room for occasional heat in there. The reason I quit using it back then was due to floor space, nothing else. You have to have certain clearances, and I got so tight on space i gave it up to make room for an assembly table.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2607 posts in 2130 days


#3 posted 03-21-2017 02:20 PM

Define ‘direct vent.’ A pellet stove is closer to direct vent than a wood stove. Wood stoves take a lot more fuel than you think they will, but with wood stoves you don’t have to buy the fuel – scrounge and you can get tons of free wood but you also have to process and store it.

If you want minimal input into that process and don’t mind picking up pellets a couple bags at a time than go pellet stove.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4407 posts in 3575 days


#4 posted 03-21-2017 02:35 PM

Check your home insurance. – -and get it in writing.

They can be a bit funny about woodstoves in general, but add that it is going to be unattended a lot of the time

————————————————————————————————

national fire code (NFPA 211) states


12.2 Location of Appliances.

12.2.1Every appliance shall be located with respect to building
construction and other equipment to allow access to the
appliance.
12.2.2 Solid fuel-burning appliances shall not be installed in
alcoves or enclosed spaces less than 512 ft3 (14.5 m3) unless
specifically listed for such use.
12.2.2.1 Solid fuel-burning appliances listed for installation
in enclosed spaces or alcoves less than 512 ft3 (14.5 m3) shall
be installed in accordance with the requirements of the listing
and the manufacturer’s instructions.
12.2.2.2 The space or room shall be sized to allow circulation
of heated air.
12.2.2.3 Appliances shall be so located as not to interfere
with the circulation of air within the heated space.

12.2.3 Solid fuel-burning appliances shall not be installed in
any location where gasoline or any other flammable vapors or
gases are present.
12.2.4 Solid fuel-burning appliances shall not be installed in
any garage.

You don’t want to get a denial of claim later.

Just one of the many regulations on things we have done for generations.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#5 posted 03-21-2017 03:32 PM

If the direct vent question was directed to me, the stove I have (and the one I linked) has provisions to hook up outside air for combustion….my definition of direct vent. If it wasn’t meant for me, I apologize for going sideways.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View pontic's profile

pontic

500 posts in 442 days


#6 posted 03-21-2017 03:57 PM

How safe are pellet stoves with saw dust?

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View bnaivar's profile

bnaivar

4 posts in 654 days


#7 posted 03-21-2017 04:01 PM

I made a wood burning stove out of an old Propane tank and use my scraps for fuel. That’s all my little 12×12 shop needs.

View rayn's profile

rayn

172 posts in 3052 days


#8 posted 03-21-2017 04:07 PM

I live in Iowa and the winters do get brisk. I have a heat pump (like the ones in Motels) so I have both heat and
air I am out there quite a bit and have not noticed any dramatic rise in the heat bill

Ray

-- Ray,Iowa

View BoxO's profile

BoxO

33 posts in 650 days


#9 posted 03-21-2017 04:12 PM

Great info folks. My shop is over a lower garage and is built just like the rest of my home. Wood frame platform. The only thing I did not do was run my HVAC to the space… It is a 3 car garage with a tandem space behind the single car door. Hence 16’ wide and 32’ deep. Space was made in case my Mom or wife’s Mom needed to live with us. I have it closed off to the garage by a 55” opening with barn door.
I have a pallet stove in our basement and love it. I thought I heard that there is a wood burning stove the re-burns the byproducts (smoke) and you can horizontal vent,(much like the pellet stove).
I was hoping this was true so I could burn all the waste (wood) and have a heating device.

Fred I do like that stove.
DrDirt – Great ideas about insurance, I guess I could say shop is in my house and not the garage. Just never had a wall closing off the space before and we just called it part of the garage. I put on up a couple years ago s I could heat and cool.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4756 posts in 2327 days


#10 posted 03-21-2017 04:21 PM


How safe are pellet stoves with saw dust?

- pontic

No problem at all, IMHO. Just as safe as any other combustion furnace.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2607 posts in 2130 days


#11 posted 03-22-2017 12:38 PM

Wood stoves do NOT direct vent. They need a flue to create draw so they don’t back draft and fill your house with smoke. That’s why I asked to you to define what you meant by direct vent. By the time you buy a stove, create a fireproof pad to sit it on, run a double walled chimney, have it inspected (you will need a permit) etc etc you may decide it’s cheaper in the long run to run another zone from your furnace to the space and just burn your scrap in an outdoor firepit.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

27044 posts in 2171 days


#12 posted 03-22-2017 12:43 PM

None. If it’s 10 below outside, so is my shop. Just suck it up and go.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View BoxO's profile

BoxO

33 posts in 650 days


#13 posted 03-22-2017 01:06 PM

Monte – Not sure how this helps. If your trying to be funny it isn’t, if your trying to be a dick you succeeded. You must be a wizard – anything of mine that is liquid freezes. Very hard to apply finish, glue projects, epoxy, spray.

Dhazelton – thank you for the clarification. It helps direct me into a different direction. I do not want to put up a chimney. I’ve thought about extending the run but I wont because of the return. Most likely keep the fire pit going.

Ray – same state. The heat pump idea is something I’ll look into,thanks.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2607 posts in 2130 days


#14 posted 03-22-2017 03:07 PM

Talk to an HVAC company. Maybe you don’t need the return in the garage. It just needs to be balanced and maybe a return somewhere else would balance it.

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