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Forum topic by needshave posted 03-19-2017 05:35 PM 393 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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needshave

168 posts in 1792 days


03-19-2017 05:35 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wainscoting shaper flutes router tooling oak filtering guides jig

I’m replicating and extending and existing wainscoting, wiping around a wall into another room. I need to machine a flute in the middle of a 4” wide members that runs vertical on the wall. (Posts) The fluting is only in the middle of the board, The board is 48” long, and the fluting needs to be approximately 32” long centered in the board.

I have the necessary cutters for my shaper to complete the machining, however has anyone every tooled for such a procedure. Currently I would have to carefully walk the board into the cutter, and unless I take a full cut, producing the final configuration, I would have to do it several times with precise positing each time. If you have any thoughts, I would appreciate hearing from you.


6 replies so far

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wuddoc

231 posts in 3551 days


#1 posted 03-19-2017 06:04 PM

For fluting we use a long sacrificial laminated fence with attached start and stop blocks to create flute(s) shorter in length than the board. We would place one end of the board against the start block and ease the board into the shaper cutter. Then we would use push shoes to move the board until we hit the stop block. Then turned off the shaper, wait for the cutter to stop rotating and removed the board.

The start block also helped with reducing kickback and the fence kept our fingers away from the cutters.

-- Wuddoc

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needshave

168 posts in 1792 days


#2 posted 03-19-2017 06:22 PM

Thanks Wuddoc,

Not totally sure I Have a full grasp of the fixture yet. Here is what I think I understand. There is a long laminated fence that is attached to the machines fence. It has a start block and an stop block on it. Start the machine and with the post on the start block ease the post into the cutter, and feed the board into the machine until you hit the stop block then shut the machine off, wait for it to stop then remove the board. Is that correct?

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wuddoc

231 posts in 3551 days


#3 posted 03-19-2017 09:47 PM

As long as there are two surfaces in contact with the flat post that being the auxiliary fence and the shaper table this is the safest way. If the post is round then a cradle needs to be manufactured to hold the round post and lock it in position so the cradle slides on the shaper table and against the auxiliary fence.

With one end of the post or cradle placed against the auxiliary fence start block and the other end angled out from the cutter ease the post into the rotating cutter until the entire post is flat against the fence. Then using push blocks slide the post until it stops at the stop block. Hold all in place, turn off shaper and wait for cutter to cease rotating. Then it is safe to remove the post.

-- Wuddoc

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builtinbkyn

1919 posts in 774 days


#4 posted 03-19-2017 09:57 PM

Unless I’m misunderstanding what you’re trying to accomplish, why wouldn’t you use a hand held router and edge guide for this with stops at each end?

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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needshave

168 posts in 1792 days


#5 posted 03-19-2017 10:52 PM

Brooklyn….. I probably could use something like the Freud 84-126 if it will allow me to machine the flute C/L 2” from the edge of the board and had a support bearing. The concern would be if I could control the torque of the motor in my hands to keep the router shaft parallel to the face of the board. I have not used a router edge guard much. I might try and see if I can find a set up somewhere that Might demonstrate whats needed.

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builtinbkyn

1919 posts in 774 days


#6 posted 03-22-2017 10:42 PM

I think using a fluting bit like that Freud outside of a table would be very dangerous. Why not use a round nose bit? If the flutes are deep, you make multiple passes. The round nose bit can be used in the table or hand held with a fence. There would be no issues with control. Obviously there are multiple flutes in your design, hence the bit you mentioned. To accomplish that only takes finding your centerline and moving the fence (table or hand held) and running the bit again. Not sure I see an issue here. I’ve done flutes like this many times on column enclosures and such. Actually I wouldn’t know another way of doing them in the center of a board.

Round Nose Bits

You can either buy a jig like this or make one, which isn’t too difficult. Or you can use the fence that works with your router and maybe extend it a bit with some hardwood. You’ll need stops at either end for obvious reasons.


Brooklyn….. I probably could use something like the Freud 84-126 if it will allow me to machine the flute C/L 2” from the edge of the board and had a support bearing. The concern would be if I could control the torque of the motor in my hands to keep the router shaft parallel to the face of the board. I have not used a router edge guard much. I might try and see if I can find a set up somewhere that Might demonstrate whats needed.

- needshave


-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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