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Has anyone installed a 3HP motor on a Ridgid R4511?

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Forum topic by b2rtch posted 10-16-2010 12:26 PM 2100 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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b2rtch

4822 posts in 2512 days


10-16-2010 12:26 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw

I like everything about my R4511 except the lack of power.
Steel City sales basically the same saw ( for much more money) with a 3HP motor.
Do you know anyone who installed a 3HP motor in a R4511?
Which frame is the existing motor in the R4511?
Thank you.

-- Bert


10 replies so far

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#1 posted 10-16-2010 01:14 PM

Bert – Are you using thin kerf blades? My 1-3/4hp hybrid didn’t have the power than my 3hp saw does, but with good alignment, and the proper thin kerf blade (~ 3”), I could cut hardwood to full blade height at a fairly reasonable pace.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Abbott

2570 posts in 2767 days


#2 posted 10-16-2010 07:49 PM

I use a TS3650 and I may switch it over to 220. That may be something you might want to consider/try before spending the $$$ on a bigger motor.

-- Ohh mann...pancakes and boobies...I'll bet that's what Heaven is like! ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#3 posted 10-16-2010 07:57 PM

Abbott makes an interesting point with the 220v. Every circuit is different, so your results may vary, but my 22124 hybrid saw had faster startup and faster recovery when I switched to 220v, which ultimately met it didn’t bog as much.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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b2rtch

4822 posts in 2512 days


#4 posted 10-16-2010 10:08 PM

Yes I use thin kerf blades and I do not understand whyy switching to 220would make a difference.

-- Bert

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#5 posted 10-16-2010 11:20 PM

What blade are you using?

220v tends to have less voltage loss during peak amperage demand. If you’re 110v circuit is fully sufficient, it might not make a difference, but if it’s lacking at all, it could be noticeable. If you’ve got 220v available, it’s an easy and inexpensive switch that might make an improvement. The 3hp motor will definitely require 220v.

My concern about putting a 3hp motor on that saw is that the pulleys, bearings, and other support structures might not handle the added torque….they might, but it’s an unknown.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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b2rtch

4822 posts in 2512 days


#6 posted 10-17-2010 01:26 AM

Steel city sales this saw very same with a 3HP motor

-- Bert

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knotscott

7211 posts in 2839 days


#7 posted 10-17-2010 01:33 AM

If it’s truly the very same, there should be no problems. If it’s only “similar”, ya never know.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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ToddTurner

144 posts in 2786 days


#8 posted 10-18-2010 02:18 AM

take a look at my projects. I upgraded my old Ridgid and it was amazing! Wiiring 220 may give about 5-10% more power but twice the horsepower will yield about 150% more power. the downside is the cost. take a look and ask questions if you need.

Todd

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MarkwithaK

370 posts in 2641 days


#9 posted 10-18-2010 04:31 AM

You also need to consider the associated components….It may not be a case of simply a down graded motor, the added HP generally comes with an increase in torque. Sure would hate for someone to get hurt because of an arbor or something similar snapped. Not to mention it would most surely void the warranty.

Switching to 220VAC would be your easiest/cheapest way to go. It will pull less full load amps and let the motor run smoother.

-- If at first you don't succeed then maybe skydiving isn't for you.

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patcollins

1420 posts in 2328 days


#10 posted 10-18-2010 04:56 AM

Something else to think about is smaller diameter blades. Think of a blade as a lever, the longer it is the more force you can put on something. The wood is you putting force on a lever, so a 7.25” lever will exert less force on the motor than a 10” lever. Not to mention the smaller blades have a thinner kerf yet. They are also cheap!

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