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A little weekly trivia: name that species?

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Forum topic by Crickett posted 03-18-2017 02:53 AM 1137 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Crickett

137 posts in 1473 days


03-18-2017 02:53 AM

While we in the north desperately wait for wormer weather, let’s keep our minds sharp. i recently found a local sawyer with a beautiful domestic hardwood, and a species i’ve never worked with. Here’s a picture of the face grain and end grain, and both in rough form and one that I skip planed. Have a safe St. Patty’s.


8 replies so far

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Woodknack

11600 posts in 2373 days


#1 posted 03-18-2017 04:33 AM

End grain looks like poplar. Face grain looks like red maple.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View higtron's profile

higtron

235 posts in 2670 days


#2 posted 03-18-2017 04:57 AM

Alder?

-- A friend will help you move, a good friend will help you move a body

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

866 posts in 3076 days


#3 posted 03-18-2017 08:11 AM

Red Elm.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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JayT

5619 posts in 2204 days


#4 posted 03-18-2017 10:34 AM

I agree with Tony. Elm

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

2143 posts in 575 days


#5 posted 03-18-2017 12:19 PM

Looks like elm from here. I enjoy working with it, even if i can’t figure which direction to come at the grain sometimes.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

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bondogaposis

4717 posts in 2344 days


#6 posted 03-18-2017 01:00 PM

Red elm.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Crickett's profile

Crickett

137 posts in 1473 days


#7 posted 03-18-2017 01:16 PM

Bingo!! Red Elm from the buckeye state. I love the density of it but the grain is a little squirly when jointed and planed. I plan on using it as a base for a kitchen island because it’s heavy and maybe milk painting and distressing it, and making a butcher block natural top.

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Woodknack

11600 posts in 2373 days


#8 posted 03-18-2017 06:09 PM

Well I was way off but I’ve never worked with elm

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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