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Disc Sander Runout

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Forum topic by JWV4 posted 03-18-2017 02:43 AM 592 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JWV4

19 posts in 380 days


03-18-2017 02:43 AM

I just bought a delta 12 inch disc sander. I powered it up today and based on advice I’ve seen online, I checked to see if there was any wobble to the sanding disk. I put a piece of wood against the sander and sanded it down a little then turned off the sander, being careful not to move the piece of wood. I spun the disc by hand to put the apparent low spot of the disc by the piece of wood. The wood was about 0.020 inches away from the sanding disk, meaning the disc is 0.020 inches out true. Is this an acceptable amount?

Also, there is definitely some vibration when the sander is running. Not enough to vibrate things off the table, but enough to be felt.

I bought the sander to true up segments for my segmented woodtunring, but I will be using it for may things, just to give an idea of what I will be using it for.

What do you think about these observations?

Thanks,

John


6 replies so far

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JWV4

19 posts in 380 days


#1 posted 03-18-2017 05:17 AM

Bascially, the main issue is that there is avout 0.020 inches of runout.

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Pete_LJ

93 posts in 586 days


#2 posted 03-18-2017 02:51 PM

I think you need to determine what is causing the runout problem. Possible suspects include: i.) bearing wear/failure; ii.) bent shaft or spindle; iii.) improperly faced connector between spindle and disc; iv.) bent or not true disc.

How does the disc attach to the spindle?

What is the disc made out of?

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splintergroup

1706 posts in 1063 days


#3 posted 03-18-2017 03:05 PM

Check the runout without any paper installed to see if the plate is true. Depending on how it is attached, you may be able to rotate it on the shaft and lock it down in a position that cancels out the 0.02 runout.

There always will be some given the paper, but for your use I’d try to eliminate it all.

If the plate is aluminum, you could use a straight piece of steel with a wrap of 100 grit silicon carbide paper and hone it flat with the disc running. 0.02 is not much, but definitely in the annoying range.

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JWV4

19 posts in 380 days


#4 posted 03-18-2017 03:28 PM

I hate to mess around with the inner workings of the disc sander, especially because I just bought it. I don’t think I should have to spend hours trying to balance the wobble on a tool I just bought.

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WhyMe

910 posts in 1401 days


#5 posted 03-18-2017 03:31 PM

I have a 12” Disk sander and the disk is not true so I use a Freud 10” Calibration & Sanding Disk on my table saw for truing up the two halves of segmented ring. I find that the disk on the table saw is easier to adjust to a perfect 90 deg. to get a flat ring.

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

513 posts in 1425 days


#6 posted 03-18-2017 03:58 PM



Check the runout without any paper installed to see if the plate is true. Depending on how it is attached, you may be able to rotate it on the shaft and lock it down in a position that cancels out the 0.02 runout.

There always will be some given the paper, but for your use I d try to eliminate it all.

If the plate is aluminum, you could use a straight piece of steel with a wrap of 100 grit silicon carbide paper and hone it flat with the disc running. 0.02 is not much, but definitely in the annoying range.

- splintergroup

I agree with this, and now need to check the condition on my stationary disc, which is only a 9-inch version. I never thought of checking that, but haven’t yet used it for precision fitting work.

Check the obvious things as mentioned so far here, and then, for a tiny amount like you have, I would not worry about honing the disc true. I find that most machines and tools need some type of tuning, when new and from time to time later. (I find it somewhat offensive that a new plane needs to be tuned, for example).

-- Jim, Houston, TX

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