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Do you cut your veneers from the inside or the outside of the bandsaw blade?

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Forum topic by DocSavage45 posted 03-17-2017 04:38 AM 2884 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DocSavage45

8181 posts in 2537 days


03-17-2017 04:38 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tip walnut maple ash bandsaw milling

Hey Lumberjocks who mill ther own lumber or bookmatch veneers!

I just got a new 17 inch 2 hp Grizzly bandsaw with cast iron wheels and trunion. Planning on sawing bookmatch veneers from lumber I’ve milled with my chainsaw.

I’d started cutting veneers on my 14 inch grizzly but it was too slow for an ADHD guy like me. LOL! Even with a 1/2 inch Timberwolf blade.

The cuts were pretty good. About 1/4 inch thick black walnut, The fence was a jig I made and I used shop made feather boards.

I have the new saw and I’m wondering what my fellow resawing Lumberjocks have found to be best in their experience.

An inquiring mind wants to know.

My recent forum topics have produced some really good information . Looking forward to applying your knowledge to my project.

Thanks!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher


22 replies so far

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Mark Wilson

2004 posts in 758 days


#1 posted 03-17-2017 05:23 AM

I have no big boy band saw myself, Tom. If I did, and I had such a question, I’d be going straight to shipwright Paul about it.

-- Mark

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shipwright

7580 posts in 2493 days


#2 posted 03-17-2017 05:24 AM

Both but I prefer outside. It keeps a clean edge against the fence.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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pmayer

957 posts in 2760 days


#3 posted 03-17-2017 05:25 AM

For thin veneers I cut them on the outside of the blade. If you cut them between the fence and the blade and you get the slightest blade deflection you could hit the fence with the blade.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

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DocSavage45

8181 posts in 2537 days


#4 posted 03-17-2017 05:32 AM

Hey Mark! Sree who responded! LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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DocSavage45

8181 posts in 2537 days


#5 posted 03-17-2017 05:34 AM

Paul and Paul, Thanks that was what I was using. Do you use feather boards?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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pmayer

957 posts in 2760 days


#6 posted 03-17-2017 05:57 AM

I don’t use a feather board. Just a large push pad.

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

25036 posts in 2033 days


#7 posted 03-17-2017 09:01 AM

Not sure I trust myself with that think of cut. I think my saw would handle it fine.

Good luck sir.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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Lazyman

1171 posts in 1082 days


#8 posted 03-17-2017 09:36 AM

In my limited experience, the advantage of cutting the face against the fence is you don’t have to change your setup each time so you get more consistent thickness. I found this video on Willam Ng’s Youtube channel helpful. He cuts it against the fence but he runs the piece across the jointer after each pass so that he always has a smooth face against the fence and each piece then has a smooth face on it after cutting. His technique of gluing the board to a piece of plywood makes the process safer, especially for the last few cuts and in my opinion, it also makes a feather board less important because the plywood backer keeps your fingers well away from the blade for every cut.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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shipwright

7580 posts in 2493 days


#9 posted 03-17-2017 02:42 PM

No finger boards here Tom. I just cut some 1/16” Tulipwood veneer a couple of months ago. At $150 USD / board foot I wouldn’t want to be running it over the jointer after every cut. :-)
As you can see I use the same shoe to control the wood when re-sawing as I do on the table saw. No need for feather boards.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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Lazyman

1171 posts in 1082 days


#10 posted 03-17-2017 04:18 PM

Yikes! At that price, I’d capture the saw dust just in case I might need it in the future. ;-)

Just curious Paul, do you wait until you’ve incorporated into your marquetry designs before you worry about getting a smooth surface?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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DocSavage45

8181 posts in 2537 days


#11 posted 03-17-2017 06:34 PM

Paul (shipwright),

Thanks for the visual aid. Do you cut anything beyond 8 inches? Looks like a 4 inch board? What saw blades do you prefer? David Marks was commenting on Lennox Bimetal blades, and I had a good forum discussion on sawblades in a previous forum topic. I spent beyond my expectations and purchased a 1/2 and a 1/4 inch blades that don’t have much pitch in the teeth as they should be smoother and more agressive and I was told they will cut better and three times longer. I also bought a 3/4 inch Timberwolf.

I know the rate is what the situation will allow. And it appears you have a 14 inch bandsaw? How long does it take for for your cuts.

As Nathan said “Yikes!” I was a little choked at the cost of the bandsaw blades.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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DocSavage45

8181 posts in 2537 days


#12 posted 03-17-2017 06:36 PM

Paul Mayer,

Thanks! Is it similar to Paul/akaShipwright’s push tool?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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DocSavage45

8181 posts in 2537 days


#13 posted 03-17-2017 06:38 PM

Nathan,

Mark Spagnola( Wood Whisperer) must have learned a similar technique from William NG as he has a video about resawing on his 21 inch bandsaw.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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shipwright

7580 posts in 2493 days


#14 posted 03-17-2017 07:05 PM

Nathan, a surface right off the saw is great for the glue side as it is already “toothed”. The good side will be sanded after assembly unless it is necessary to thickness it to match other species in the motif.

Tom, I don’t often cut more than 8” although I can at home on my 18” Delta. The saw you see is the 11” ShopSmith bandsaw that I have here in Az. It has a capacity of 6” and I have cut all of that in Amaranth (Purpleheart)
I’m currently using a Lennox Trimaster, maybe overkill for some species but I was happy to have it for the Amaranth and the Tulipwood. They are both kind of hard and I didn’t need a dull blade wandering in the Tulipwood.
Sorry, I’ve never timed a cut but it is a feel thing anyway and will vary with lots of variables.

Here’s the little SS saw cutting 6” Amaranth.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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DocSavage45

8181 posts in 2537 days


#15 posted 03-17-2017 07:20 PM

Paul,

Thanks! It will be awhile for me to buy the trimaster. Heard lots of good things about it. Larger saw more money. LOL! And I need to become familiar with my saw. When spending a lot of money on special woods that are costly a trimaster blade fits the equation. Been told that there is very little smoothing needed with that blade?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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