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Ok so its not orangepeel...what do I need to do?

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Forum topic by depictureboy posted 10-15-2010 01:29 AM 1253 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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depictureboy

420 posts in 3107 days


10-15-2010 01:29 AM

Topic tags/keywords: oak spray gun finishing

do I just keep adding coats? I am using zinsser sanding sealer…i have put on 2 coats so far…should I now go to WB Poly? I like the character of the wood, but I am not sure I like what its doing with the finish…

When you stand back its not as obvious…but me personally I am not sure I am happy with the current state.

-- If you can't build it, code it. If you can't code it, build it. But always ALWAYS take a picture.


11 replies so far

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GaryL

1094 posts in 2295 days


#1 posted 10-15-2010 01:52 AM

It looks like you have alot of sealer on for only two coats. I would recommend sanding this with 220 and untill smooth and then coat with your finish coat of choice. If 220 makes you nervous, then use 320. It just will take a little longer. Be careful of your corners. You’re still going to have the porous texture since you did not fill the pores.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

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depictureboy

420 posts in 3107 days


#2 posted 10-15-2010 02:07 AM

Well when I started I was thinking of just using the sealer…though I guess I could have sprayed it too heavy…i feel like such a n00b…hehe

If i did decide to sand would I use a ros? or do it by hand? The shellac is over a coat of blo, so I guess it would be hand sanding so I dont go to deep…

-- If you can't build it, code it. If you can't code it, build it. But always ALWAYS take a picture.

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GaryL

1094 posts in 2295 days


#3 posted 10-15-2010 02:37 AM

Hand sand. I have used a 1/4 sheet orbital with 320 on flat surfaces, but you have to keep it moving and use a light touch. Hand sanding is a safer bet. Stop when the surface feels smooth so you don’t sand into the wood.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

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huff

2828 posts in 2749 days


#4 posted 10-15-2010 03:27 AM

depictureboy, Is there a stain on your oak? With the close-up pictures, it looks like your sealer is reacting to something on or in the wood. Your finish is not flowing out (almost like there is wax or some kind of contaminate in the pours of the wood). I’m surprised,because shellac is usually great to go over anything. I would do as GaryL suggested and sand your surfaces down as far as possible and then spray a very “light” coat of shellac to see how it reacts.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

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Sawdust4Blood

392 posts in 2486 days


#5 posted 10-15-2010 03:34 AM

It looks like the wood is red oak which is a very open grain wood. If the goal is to get the appearance of red oak color and grain with a smooth surface, I would recommend CrystaLac clear wood grain filler rather than an ordinary sanding sealer. This product works real well for me in woods with very open grain. Otherwise you’ll have to do about a million coats and hours of sanding before you build a continuous smooth surface.

Another option is to create a slurry of sanding dust and BLO to fill the pores but you’ll lose much of the appearance of the red oak grain.

-- Greg, Severn MD

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Karson

35035 posts in 3865 days


#6 posted 10-15-2010 06:30 AM

It looks to me to be too heavy,

I use shellac sanding sealer over oil all of the time. I like the oil to give the wood some depth. To fill the pores I use danish oil with pumice stone. I use my own fornula of 1/3 BLO, 1/3 varnish and 1/3 mineral spirits and I then use about 1/4 cap of Japan drier for about 1 cup of finish. It hardenes up in 24 hours so don’t make too much.

When I mix the pumice with the oil micture and I rub it into the pores using a putty knife. I then let it harden and use a sharpened putty knife to gently cut the extra off the surface. Then I would topcoat it with the shellac.

Here’s a blog I created on my pore filling.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware soon moving to Virginia karsonwm@gmail.com †

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depictureboy

420 posts in 3107 days


#7 posted 10-15-2010 01:01 PM

huff, its just BLO, I think what you are seeing is some plane chatter that I left in for some character…I think I probably did put it on too heavy to begin with, but I was thinking that I would use the shellac as my topcoat…but I dont like the way it looks up close…If I sand it down, should I just then do a top coat of wb Poly? Maybe I havent sanded it enough yet, I only did a very light 320 to take off the roughness, ill get some 220 today and hand sand it tonite and see what it looks like in the am…

Thanks all…karson if you happen to be around millsboro this weekend, i wouldnt mind you popping in and taking a look :)

-- If you can't build it, code it. If you can't code it, build it. But always ALWAYS take a picture.

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depictureboy

420 posts in 3107 days


#8 posted 10-15-2010 02:57 PM

well i went ahead and started sanding it down with 220 grit ROS disks on my sanding block…It looks a bit better, on one of the smaller sections, i actually took denatured and rubbed over it. Ill see how it looks tonite, but before I left it seemed to look better.

I am wondering if I just didnt sand enough. I did get overly enthusiastic because I was going to wetsand with the BLO to help with the pores, but forgot to do it once I got the sprayer…oh well…live and learn…

-- If you can't build it, code it. If you can't code it, build it. But always ALWAYS take a picture.

View miles125's profile

miles125

2180 posts in 3470 days


#9 posted 10-15-2010 03:07 PM

I agree something is repelling the sealer. No chance you thinned it with the wrong thinner?

-- "The way to make a small fortune in woodworking- start with a large one"

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depictureboy

420 posts in 3107 days


#10 posted 10-15-2010 03:48 PM

didnt thin it at all…which may be the problem too…i used it straight from the can….well after I poured into the spray cup :)

-- If you can't build it, code it. If you can't code it, build it. But always ALWAYS take a picture.

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ajosephg

1878 posts in 3025 days


#11 posted 10-16-2010 04:55 AM

I’ve had similar problems on oak. Solution was thin the varnish, apply many coats, sanding after every few coats until it levels. My theory is that the air in the open grain keeps the varnish out due to surface tension issues. Making it thin will enable it to creap down into the cavity.

-- Joe

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