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Gonna need a table!!!!! Also need help with shop layout

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Forum topic by Rockytop posted 03-16-2017 06:46 PM 1310 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rockytop

37 posts in 457 days


03-16-2017 06:46 PM

Ok, so like I’ve said in all my post, I’m just getting started and trying to always improve. I’ve sold several of my rustic pieces and have an order for another farm style table, so I assume I’m at least doing some things right, LOL! Anyway, on to the entrée(appetizers upset me), I’m using my leonard buildings metal building as my makeshift shop for now( don’t hate, it’s all I got). It is 12×24 and most of it is used as storage. I’ll be using at least 12×12 to set up my shop. So, I’m asking those with tiny spaces to help me design a layout or suggestions as to where things go. It is a roof with 7’ tall walls on the short ends. It is 12 wide and has a 10 roll door on one end. I’ll be using this end as my shop(12 feet deep). So…GO!!!!!!
And the other part of the question, as my space is limited, a lot of builds are my builds are being done outside on sawhorses and using a pallet as my work top. I’m over this! I want to build a table on inflatable tires that I can roll outside when I have to, This will be main table and will probably have to double as an out feed table for the table saw. I want it to have some kind of plastic top(hdpe or Teflon or something like) and I want to be adjust both height and level of the top. I’m hoping to spend no more than 600 and can use my barn wood or pallet wood if I need to, The top alone will be almost 300, if I make it 4×8. So please shoot me some ideas!!!!


16 replies so far

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Rockytop

37 posts in 457 days


#1 posted 03-17-2017 01:15 PM

Bump. Please share ideas…

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bondogaposis

4472 posts in 2184 days


#2 posted 03-17-2017 01:50 PM

Why not use plastic laminate on plywood or MDF for the top?

-- Bondo Gaposis

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higtron

231 posts in 2510 days


#3 posted 03-17-2017 02:00 PM

I believe working off saw horses were where most of us started out woodworking, when I was in my twenties with a million ideas and no money I built all kinds of projects with a skill saw working off saw horses because that’s all I had. It is hard to say what to do with your 12’x12’ shop space as we have no information what tools do you have what are your interests in woodworking? Pictures of your current situation would help but, mostly I would say go to the top of the page and click the shop button look at what others have done and adapt the concepts you like to your needs good luck.

-- A friend will help you move, a good friend will help you move a body

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simonov

51 posts in 338 days


#4 posted 03-17-2017 02:24 PM

Some of the Most Discussed and Most Favorited Lumberjocks workshops are very small indeed. You should spend some time going through them:

http://lumberjocks.com/workshops/by/comments
http://lumberjocks.com/workshops/by/favorites

-- Nunc est bibendum.

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Rockytop

37 posts in 457 days


#5 posted 03-17-2017 06:32 PM



Why not use plastic laminate on plywood or MDF for the top?

- bondogaposis


bondogaposis, I’m wanting a top that glue can’t adhere to. But still be soft enough to be sacrificial if a saw a saw blade where to hit it

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Rockytop

37 posts in 457 days


#6 posted 03-17-2017 06:33 PM

Thank you, higtron and Simonov. I’ll check them out!

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Rockytop

37 posts in 457 days


#7 posted 03-17-2017 06:37 PM

Does anyone know if TitebondII will adhere to plexiglass?

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JayT

5453 posts in 2044 days


#8 posted 03-17-2017 06:49 PM

Why not use plastic laminate on plywood or MDF for the top?

- bondogaposis

bondogaposis, I m wanting a top that glue can t adhere to. But still be soft enough to be sacrificial if a saw a saw blade where to hit it

- Rockytop

Masonite (hardboard) with a coat of paste wax. Won’t damage the saw blades and is easy to replace when it gets too dinged up.

For layout, have you tried using the Grizzly Workshop Planner? It’s a good way to look at how much space certain tools take within your footprint and how to set them up for best work flow.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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Rick_M

10598 posts in 2213 days


#9 posted 03-17-2017 06:51 PM

I agree with Bondo, but you could use hardboard or plywood, put a couple coats of poly on top. I wouldn’t use plexi, scratches too easily, within a year it’ll look awful.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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higtron

231 posts in 2510 days


#10 posted 03-17-2017 07:30 PM

Titebond will stick to plastic laminate and plexi-glass but when dry it will pop right off, plastic laminate would be my choice because it would not show scratches as badly as plexi-glass.

-- A friend will help you move, a good friend will help you move a body

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oldnovice

6419 posts in 3200 days


#11 posted 03-18-2017 03:41 AM

I know that this is like apples and oranges, but my uncle in Germany, had a 6’ × 6’ shop and a very small worbench.
Obviously he had no stationary power tools and his favorite project was extraordinary detailed bird houses.
I lost count of how many he made but they were mixed material, wood, cement, and copper sheets.

I guess what I am saying is start small …. expand as needed.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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simonov

51 posts in 338 days


#12 posted 03-18-2017 12:06 PM

Surfacing a bench with Masonite/hardboard was a trick I learned from my father long ago. It works well for the purpose and as Jay T said it can be easily replaced when it gets too messed up.

At my shop (not my woodshop, my business shop) we have been using home made wooden assembly and packaging benches for over ten years. The benchtops are plywood sheathing covered with Masonite. They work very, very well. Several of them have been recovered with new Masonite, since they can get pretty beat up and stained with oil. A new Masonite panel makes them good as new.

I am designing a table saw outfeed and assembly table for my (wood) shop. I sure like the idea of plastic laminate, but I will probably end up going with Masonite because of the ease of replacement. Haven’t decided yet. I commandeered one of my warehouse manager’s benches for woodwork in the meantime, and boy have I wrecked the top; I’ll have to replace the Masonite before I give it back. That wouldn’t be so cheap and easy to do with plastic laminate (of course, the plastic laminate is tougher and more resistant to stains and adhesives and easier to clean).

The next couple of photos aren’t of woodworking benches, but they are examples of how we use the different working surfaces.

In the foreground are a couple of big 4×8 foot rollaround benches on casters we use to move goods around the shop. The one in front has a Masonite cover, and the one behind it has a plastic top factory laminated on plywood (I can’t get this stuff up here in Reno; the bench was made when we were still in SoCal). The rollarounds don’t get beat up like the assembly benches do, so the laminated top works okay for them. It’s expensive stuff.

In the background you can see some of the assembly benches.

This photo is of a workbench I have in my office. It has been cut up and reconfigured many times over the years. When I moved the vise I didn’t want to have to go out and buy another piece of Masonite, so I simply turned the old piece around and filled the old vise holes with wood putty. Quick and esay upgrade.

-- Nunc est bibendum.

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Rockytop

37 posts in 457 days


#13 posted 03-20-2017 02:45 AM

Thanks for all the replies! I’m going to be building an adjustable height/level table on casters.

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TungOil

740 posts in 328 days


#14 posted 03-20-2017 03:44 AM

Instead of skinning your top with 1/4” MDF, consider a piece of 1/4” pre-finished birch ply. No glue will stick to it, soft on tools and easy to replace when beat up. Costs a bit more however. Of course you will need something underneath for support.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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mummykicks

109 posts in 1635 days


#15 posted 03-23-2017 10:49 PM



Does anyone know if TitebondII will adhere to plexiglass?

- Rockytop


Loctite PL or contact cement. Contact cement works well on just about anything, and doesn’t require a gazillion clamps, just a roller.

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