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Determine model# of old Craftsman Jointer?

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Forum topic by wkearney99 posted 03-15-2017 03:30 AM 1458 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wkearney99

22 posts in 948 days


03-15-2017 03:30 AM

I picked up an older Craftsman 6-1/8” Jointer. Seems to work reasonably well, only a bit of surface rust here any there. Needs new blades, which I expected. But overall it seems to be in decent condition.

How do I tell what model it is? The label apparently broke off at some point in it’s past. Underneath I read “804791” and “V3” cast into the underside of the bed. The motor model is 67094.

Here’s a picture of the motor’s label:

Any idea how old it might be?

What’re the right blades to use in it? I’m likely going to be working with some walnut and maple.

-- --Bill Kearney


21 replies so far

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emart

445 posts in 2466 days


#1 posted 03-15-2017 04:30 AM

show a pic of the jointer itself. motors get replaced a lot so they arent the best indicator

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

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wkearney99

22 posts in 948 days


#2 posted 03-16-2017 07:58 PM

Good point, I have it off the base.






-- --Bill Kearney

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wkearney99

22 posts in 948 days


#3 posted 03-16-2017 08:00 PM

It has three blades with two screws holding each, along with two of what I assume are height adjuster screws for them. I gather these are somewhat generic blades, being 6-1/8” width?

-- --Bill Kearney

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MrUnix

6010 posts in 2038 days


#4 posted 03-16-2017 10:47 PM

They made those jointers for years – unfortunately, trying to nail down a specific model number will be difficult. Fortunately, they were all pretty much the same, so a manual for just about any one of them will in most cases be sufficient, such as this one for the 113.20650 Craftsman 6-1/8 inch Jointer over at the VM site (you can find others there as well). The knives should be P/N 18112, which are pretty standard. You can get them from sears, or buy aftermarket ones like the Freud C400 set. Size is 6-1/8 by 11/16 by 1/8. You can also have the knives that are in there now re-sharpened – either through mail order or from a local sharpening service. Typically about $1 an inch or less.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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wkearney99

22 posts in 948 days


#5 posted 03-17-2017 01:28 AM

I had a devil of a time extracting the old knives. Two of them came out after a soaking of penetrating oil. Their wedges wouldn’t budge. Fortunately a turn upward on their lifting screws popped them loose. The third one, however, was having none of that. And along the way I managed to mostly strip-out the socket head of one of the lifting screws. I got the 3rd blade out by rotating the cylinder to where the knife was pointing down and then tapped it loose from above using a long punch. Took a fair bit of patience to avoid banging away on it. It appears there was just enough corrosion to keep the wedge from coming loose. But the surfaces look like they’ll clean up well enough to be reusable.

The trick now, however, is finding another one of those lifter screws. None of the ones on searspartsdirect appear to be using the same kind of flush head screw. As shown in the PDF for the 20650 you mentioned:

The ones online appear to be using more of a set-screw kind of arrangement. This one uses the flush surface of the lifter screw as a platform under the knife edge to allow raising/lowering the height by turning the lifter screw.

Any ideas on a proper source for replacements? The other five look to be OK but I’d gladly buy a few spares to avoid getting tripped up later.

-- --Bill Kearney

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MrUnix

6010 posts in 2038 days


#6 posted 03-17-2017 01:40 AM

According to the parts diagram, those screws (#52 on the diagram) are 1/2” long 10-32 flat head socket screws. You can check the ones you already pulled out to confirm. A quick google turns up all sorts of places selling them... even walmart :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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wkearney99

22 posts in 948 days


#7 posted 03-17-2017 04:26 PM

I think you’re right that it’s a 113.20650. It appears to be on a different base than the one shown in that manual (legs are more splayed in the one I have). But any number of things could have be rejiggered with this over time, so who knows.

The annoying thing is the searspartsdirect has a 113.20621 and the diagram appears to show the right kind of lifter screw, by the detail page for the part shows something entirely different

As for generic 10-32, I become skeptical of generic replacements for a variety of reasons. Geometry being slightly off, material being dissimilar enough to cause problems, etc. Even more skeptical given the crap Walmart imports.

-- --Bill Kearney

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emart

445 posts in 2466 days


#8 posted 03-18-2017 06:46 AM



Good point, I have it off the base.






- wkearney99


I have that exact same jointer I can look up the manual for you tomorrow.

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

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MrUnix

6010 posts in 2038 days


#9 posted 03-18-2017 07:53 AM

As for generic 10-32, I become skeptical of generic replacements for a variety of reasons.

LOL – that certainly may be valid for castings and machine specific stuff, but not for standard off the shelf hardware store items. A lot of companies used to mark those parts, so you would know that you could get them locally… some even went so far as to give special part numbers to them (Delta used a “SP” prefix, and even published lists). Others put an asterisk or other marks in the parts diagram to indicate standard hardware items… even Craftsman! If you check the manual I linked to, and look at the parts diagram for those screws, you will see:

Sears (Craftsman, or in this case Emerson) doesn’t make standard hardware items (or bearings, or jointer knives, or v-belts, or…..) – They buy them from suppliers who do. As shown, many companies used to let you know what you could get locally so you didn’t have to hassle with them… until they found out that they could slap some obscure part number on it, mark it up two, three or more times what it cost, and then sell it for a nice profit. The screw you buy down at your local ACE hardware store (or Fastenal, or Graingers, or McMaster Carr, etc…) won’t be any different than what you would get from them. And in the case of the knife adjustment screws you are looking at, they don’t even effect the machines operation – you could use it just fine without them – although it would be more difficult to set the knives without them (that is their only purpose).

Cheers,
Brad

PS: I don’t actually recommend purchasing through wally world – that was just to elaborate how many sources of those things there actually is ;-)

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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canadianchips

2600 posts in 2836 days


#10 posted 03-18-2017 10:01 PM

Looks identical to one of mine. I bought this one new in 1975. If that is any help !
You might want to put the adjuster screws back in. The back table on this model does not adjust, so you have to adjust your knives proper height.
Those blades can be sharpened a lot. Perhaps thats all you have to do with these. Unless there is a serious knick in them !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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wkearney99

22 posts in 948 days


#11 posted 03-18-2017 10:11 PM

They had a pretty serious nick in them. About 3/8” wide, about 1/2” from the fence edge and maybe around 1/16” deep. New blades are inexpensive enough to skip fixing these. But next time, yeah, I’d certainly want to plan to keep ‘em sharp (and avoid gouging them).

I have a magnetic arm dial indicator, so adjusting their height shouldn’t be excessively tedious.

-- --Bill Kearney

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wkearney99

22 posts in 948 days


#12 posted 03-20-2017 12:26 AM

Coming along with the jointer, working my way through the rusty bits. Nothing major, it’s all coming off pretty easily with some PB, scotchbrites and 220 paper. Looks like one of the jack screws was missing, but it’s just a 5/16 bolt. Infeed was level without it, go figure.

The bottom of two legs was pretty rusty and I’ll likely end up painting the entire stand. The jointer base itself, however, is actually in pretty decent condition, so I might not paint it.

Whose dark gray paint most closely matches what Craftsman used on the legs?

-- --Bill Kearney

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canadianchips

2600 posts in 2836 days


#13 posted 03-20-2017 02:44 PM

i use automotive paint. We can match it at Canadian Tire stores here !.
I think “Machine grey” is close to old emmerson tools.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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wkearney99

22 posts in 948 days


#14 posted 03-24-2017 02:41 PM

While continuing to clean it, I came across a few more casting numbers. 804624 cast into the underside of the infeed table, and 721219-113 on one of the dovetail sliding joints. The fence has ST15571 and 721229 cast into it.




While I’m disassembling this it occurs to me the bearings probably ought to get replaced “while I’m at it”. They’re held in place with circlips so they’re pretty simple to R&R. I didn’t oeprate the planer for all that long before embarking on this process. I didn’t hear any ‘bad’ sounds from the bearings. But the process of extracting the knives had a lot of penetrating oil involved and I’m sure some probably got into the bearings. I’m thinking it’d be better to replace them now instead of waiting.

The dimensions on them read 1-3/8 OD, 5/8” ID (the shaft itself) and 7/8 width. It fits relatively snugly on the shaft, but not press-fit tight.

Since I can’t authoritatively ‘nail down’ this thing’s exact model number, how interchangeable are the bearings across different models?

Any suggestions on alternative suppliers to searspartsdirect?

-- --Bill Kearney

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MrUnix

6010 posts in 2038 days


#15 posted 03-24-2017 04:24 PM

Most bearings are metric, however some of those Emerson machines used metric bearings with english measurements for the bore – and 5/8” is a very common one. Check the sides of the bearings for numbers, either on the edge of the outer race or on the seal/shield. Might be hard to read without some magnification, but they usually have them on there. And try measuring in metric as well.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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