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Auriou gouges

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Forum topic by HeathBlair posted 03-14-2017 02:03 AM 648 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HeathBlair

2 posts in 276 days


03-14-2017 02:03 AM

Hello, all. I’m new to the forum and new to wood carving. I’ve been around woodworking a good part of my life and have built a couple of acoustic guitars most recently. In the last year or so, I’ve become interested in carving and have made a handful of spoons and small bowls/trays. My first gouge was a Hirsch 20mm #7 and aside from the thick finish on the handle, I really like the tool. It came well polished and sharpened and has felt great in my hand. I wanted to try a few different brands before I started to put together a set, so I bought an Auriou 26mm #9. I have to say, I haven’t loved that gouge just yet. It doesn’t move as effortlessly through the wood as my Hirsch. I’m wondering why? Do any of you have experience with the Auriou brand of gouges? Am I just noticing the difference in width and sweep between the two gouges I have? It seems the bevel angle on the Auriou may be a bit steep, as well. That’s a lot of metal to re-grind on a $50 gouge. Any other advice would be appreciated.


3 replies so far

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Planeman40

1035 posts in 2598 days


#1 posted 03-14-2017 04:01 PM

“It seems the bevel angle on the Auriou may be a bit steep”

I answered this for a fellow a few days ago. Here it is again. Most new carving tools are rough ground to shape on the cutting edge so it is not surprising that this is the case as it is common on new carving tools. I gained a lot of insight into obtaining a proper angle and edge after making 62 of my own carving gouges and chisels. There is a balance in choosing the edge angle. A low angle cuts easily with little pressure and deeply, but is subject to damage if abused. A high angle requires more pressure and effort but the edge can take some abuse. I recommend you use a rough stone or grinder to remake the edge angle shallower (if power grinding, be sure to keep the tool edge cool so you don’t lose the temper in the steel). Sharpen until you can easily shave the hair off your forearm!

Personally, I prefer that shallower angle and I am careful not to abuse the tool.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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HeathBlair

2 posts in 276 days


#2 posted 03-14-2017 11:04 PM

Thanks for the reply. I actually did read that post regarding bevel angles. The Auriou gouge was sharp out of the box. I was able to shave with it, which is how I test all of my cutting edges. I guess I just need to grind a shallower bevel (or maybe just return it and stick with Hirsch). Been wanting to try Pfeil, as well.

Any other thoughts?

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Planeman40

1035 posts in 2598 days


#3 posted 03-15-2017 02:04 PM

All of those are good choices, but expensive. You may want to consider some less expensive but excellent alternatives. Take a look at the “Mastercarver” brand of chisels and gouges at http://www.woodcarverssupply.com/. I am convinced these are the same hand-forged Chinese made irons that I used for my gouges. Go to my projects at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/183218 and http://lumberjocks.com/projects/265290 and you can read all about them and the steel. The Chinese have a 2,000 years and more history of fantastic wood carving, much of it in Rosewood which is like carving a brick.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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