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How to attach torsion box top to base???

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Forum topic by Walker posted 03-14-2017 01:47 AM 621 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Walker

35 posts in 309 days


03-14-2017 01:47 AM

So I’m done with the base for my workbench. I’m going to build a torsion box top for it with 1/2” MDF skins. My question is how to attach the top to the base? Most of the online plans and websites seem to gloss over or ignore this part. Would L-brackets or figure 8 clips be sufficient or do I need to devise something more heavy duty?

-- ~Walker


8 replies so far

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

805 posts in 1278 days


#1 posted 03-14-2017 02:07 AM

L brackets or figure-8’s would work fine, as would screws through cleats attached to the base.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View Andre's profile

Andre

1493 posts in 1642 days


#2 posted 03-14-2017 02:09 AM

I would attach a full width block on either end to act like a Mortise and tenon on the inside of your base frame?
You could glue/screw it onto the bottom panel before assembly, then the top could be removable.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View clin's profile

clin

751 posts in 833 days


#3 posted 03-14-2017 02:58 AM

Pocket screws in your base up into the top.

-- Clin

View Walker's profile

Walker

35 posts in 309 days


#4 posted 03-14-2017 03:25 AM

Would pocket screws be essentially the same strength as doing cleats? Seems like it would be about the same, with pocket screws being less work. The base has little to no movement and I’d like for the top to not add any. I don’t need it the top to be removable, as it will only be 32” deep. It will fit through my doorways if I ever relocate. Maybe a cleat/block on either end and pocket screws throughout the rest would be quite sturdy?

Btw Clin, the base came out great. My over-complicated design made for an over-complicated (patience testing) build, but it worked as intended. I toned it down following your and others advice. It seems super sturdy and is as flat and level as I could have hoped for.

-- ~Walker

View newwoodbutcher's profile

newwoodbutcher

711 posts in 2687 days


#5 posted 03-14-2017 06:08 AM

I agree with Andre. Even if the blocks only receive screws for the figure eights. I would probably not mortise though for a piece of shop furniture. I’d probably go with pocket screws and interior blocks.

-- Ken

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4757 posts in 2330 days


#6 posted 03-14-2017 11:43 AM

I don’t think I would fasten it to the frame. Instead I would just put 4 cleats on the underside of the top that would sit on 4 of those pockets you have. The weight of the top should hold it down, and the cleats keep it from sliding off the frame.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View clin's profile

clin

751 posts in 833 days


#7 posted 03-16-2017 10:58 PM



Would pocket screws be essentially the same strength as doing cleats? Seems like it would be about the same, with pocket screws being less work. The base has little to no movement and I d like for the top to not add any. I don t need it the top to be removable, as it will only be 32” deep. It will fit through my doorways if I ever relocate. Maybe a cleat/block on either end and pocket screws throughout the rest would be quite sturdy?

Btw Clin, the base came out great. My over-complicated design made for an over-complicated (patience testing) build, but it worked as intended. I toned it down following your and others advice. It seems super sturdy and is as flat and level as I could have hoped for.

- Walker

If cleats are only screwed on, there is no advantage to them. But they could of course also be glued. But just pocket screws are likely fine. And if the day comes, you find those working loose. You could glue and screw cleats on.

Solve the problem if you ever have it. But, lets keep in mind that adding some cleats is super simple.

I certainly would use a good number of screws. Like every 8” or so. It is overkill in a sense. Any one screw is probably good for 100+ lbs of shear. But if you are putting a lot of side loads on the top, like hand planing. You want to make sure the screws don’t wear down the wood and loosen over time.

-- Clin

View jbay's profile

jbay

1857 posts in 736 days


#8 posted 03-16-2017 11:38 PM

L Brackets are plenty..

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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