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Any measuring tools with tenths of an inch?

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Forum topic by Rammstein1224 posted 03-14-2017 12:34 AM 3590 views 0 times favorited 51 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rammstein1224

28 posts in 278 days


03-14-2017 12:34 AM

As an engineer i spend my entire day in the world of thousandths of an inch. Now obviously word working isn’t that exact but i prefer to work in my native units if possible. Do you guys know if any measuring tools can be bought with tenths of an inch markings like an engineer square? Google has not been my friend but i could not be using the proper terminology. Any ideas?

-- As an OCD engineer I live in a perfect world with a hobby of woodworking that is anything but perfect.


51 replies so far

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canadianchips

2600 posts in 2836 days


#1 posted 03-14-2017 12:43 AM

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Dark_Lightning

2922 posts in 2948 days


#2 posted 03-14-2017 12:55 AM

You don’t have some of these in your measuring tool arsenal already?

http://www.starrett.com/metrology/metrology-products/precision-measuring-tools/precision-rules-straight-edges-parallels/Precision-Rules#currentPage=1&displayMode=grid&itemsPerPage=24&sortBy=wp/asc

I have 4”, 6”, 12” and 24 ” scales marked both ways, accumulated over the years.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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ksSlim

1263 posts in 2729 days


#3 posted 03-14-2017 01:16 AM

As a retired cal lab operator, I have Starrett and Browne and Sharp.

-- Sawdust and shavings are therapeutic

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Rammstein1224

28 posts in 278 days


#4 posted 03-14-2017 01:30 AM

I have all the usual tools needed as i have been into woodworking for about 2 years now but all of them are in fractional rule as anything locally I haven’t been able to find in tenths. That tape looks good may have to pick that up.

I’d like a square of some kind over a scale for obvious reasons but I figured I’d ask before I just get a scale. I was just wondering if I’m not using the right terminology or something

-- As an OCD engineer I live in a perfect world with a hobby of woodworking that is anything but perfect.

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Tommy Evans

141 posts in 2013 days


#5 posted 03-14-2017 01:45 AM

5R graduations is what you may want….. 5R Graduations: 32nds, 64ths, 10ths, 100ths

http://www.victornet.com/detail/PER-12-5R.html

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Madmark2

373 posts in 427 days


#6 posted 03-14-2017 01:47 AM

Woodworking is an ancient art – most all stock is fractional dimensions. You have precision implications when converting back and forth. 5/16” tolererences to 1/32” while 0.3125” suggests 0.0001” – impossible in wood 0.31” doesn’t obviously map to 5/16” and implies .010” tol.

Incra makes incredible rules:

Fractions make it easy to halve and double in your head – a common event in woodworking.

M

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Rammstein1224

28 posts in 278 days


#7 posted 03-14-2017 02:50 AM

The problem i see is that the trade size of wood is nice and nominal but in reality its usually shorter. Im sure theres some big long explanation for that but it sure make making things as perfect as possible hard. On top of that is i do all my projects in CAD. I cannot freeball it, just dont have that in me. So i draw everything “perfect” so its nice to be able to then transfer that to the wood to get as close as possible and then tolerances arent as big a factor due to the natural properties of wood.

e.g. 3/4” plywood is actually around .70 so .05 doesn’t sound like alot but multiply that by even 3 or 4 times and it adds up. How do traditional woodworkers compensate for that?

But that rule looks nice…


Woodworking is an ancient art – most all stock is fractional dimensions. You have precision implications when converting back and forth. 5/16” tolererences to 1/32” while 0.3125” suggests 0.0001” – impossible in wood 0.31” doesn t obviously map to 5/16” and implies .010” tol.

Incra makes incredible rules:

Fractions make it easy to halve and double in your head – a common event in woodworking.

M

- Madmark2


-- As an OCD engineer I live in a perfect world with a hobby of woodworking that is anything but perfect.

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jimintx

513 posts in 1423 days


#8 posted 03-14-2017 02:52 AM

Rules like you want are available, but I’ll add that I’ve had an engineering degree for about four decades. I do woodwork in 16ths and 32nds, and can’t even imagine doing wood projects in tenths.

Buy your tenth-graduated rules and scales, but since you are an engineer, I know you can learn to use the system of measurement that is most prevalent in your country.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

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Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#9 posted 03-14-2017 03:02 AM

Measurement is the enemy of precision. Putting that aside, I have tapes and rules in tenths.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Rammstein1224

28 posts in 278 days


#10 posted 03-14-2017 03:10 AM

Is there some magic trick that im not privy to? i just dont see how you can end up with something that is square when like in the example i mentioned above 3/4” plywood is actually ~.7. I can see doing it if wood was somewhat close to an actual fractional size but it usually isnt.

Like when im designing a machining part i start with a trade size that is damn near actual size so i can compensate for that. Im not trying to be difficult i just am struggling how to get accuracy while wood working.


Rules like you want are available, but I ll add that I ve had an engineering degree for about four decades. I do woodwork in 16ths and 32nds, and can t even imagine doing wood projects in tenths.

Buy your tenth-graduated rules and scales, but since you are an engineer, I know you can learn to use the system of measurement that is most prevalent in your country.

- jimintx


-- As an OCD engineer I live in a perfect world with a hobby of woodworking that is anything but perfect.

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jimintx

513 posts in 1423 days


#11 posted 03-14-2017 04:01 AM

Well, here is the magic, as I see it. And it’s just an opinion but one based on empirical data and experience. One of the great things about this hobby is that you can tackle it almost any way you prefer. I can’t understand it, but I read that folks in euros do woodwork using the metric system, even (gasp!).

I believe you have revealed part of the the answer to your query when you used that ”~” symbol, which means the measurement is approximate.

I know that you will agree that doing work in 16ths and 32nds, and 64ths, is more precise than in 1/10ths.

After all, 45/64” is 0.703”, or 22/32” is 0.688”.
Those thicknesses cover the ~0.7” figure, and really they are all the same to me when working in wood.

And you are certainly correct that this play, or slop, in measurement doesn’t apply when machining parts out of metal or high performance resins.

There are plenty of digital devices that read out in thousandths, and if you go onto the web, start at Amazon, you can find your desired measuring devices. In less than 30 seconds I located this tape on Amazon:
Komelon 433IEHV High-Visibility Professional Tape Measure both Inch and Engineer Scale Printed 33-feet by 1-Inch, Chrome on Amazon._

Despite me joking above, you could give some thought to going all metric. Lots of rules and tapes available in that system.

And do investigate getting some of the measuring and marking tools from Woodpeckers, which are divine, and pretty, and also pricey.

One other thing that is part of my work processes, is that I just sort of go out and make some cuts and start building. Sometime I might do a rough sketch on a 1/4” quadrille tablet, to sort out what overlaps what, and so forth. I have not ever used any form of CAD, or Sketch Up or other software, and have almost never used any type of plans of cut-lists. You could say that while I got the degree and some decent jobs in the field thereafter, I am more artist than engineer at heart.
.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

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Rick_M

10640 posts in 2219 days


#12 posted 03-14-2017 05:01 AM

I’m not being a smart ass, but woodworking is not machining. All measurement systems are just an arbitrary way of communicating distance. Before the industrial revolution, parts were made one at a time to fit where they were needed and it didn’t matter if they were identical. Woodworking predates the industrial revolution and doesn’t depend on accuracy. Keep in mind that in woodworking, precision almost always trumps accuracy. So if you are making a dado, it doesn’t matter what it is on a specific measurement scale, it only matters that the tongue fits. Similar, if you are making a table, it doesn’t matter if the legs are 29”, 29.1”, 29-1/8”, or 74cm; what matters is they are all the same. You might have a hard time with this coming from an engineering background but it’s liberating when you embrace it.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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oldnovice

6433 posts in 3206 days


#13 posted 03-14-2017 06:54 AM

Rock M is correct, about measurements.
Now retired, I worked for over 45 years in engineering with mechanical switches, semiconductors, cell phone test systems, laser interferometers, DNA micro-arrays and, through all those years I did woodworking.
I used a lot of different measurements and worked through the time some U.S. companies moved to the metric system when all prints had to be dual dimensioned.

I use fractional inch, decimal inch, mm, cm, and even architectural rulers (like that shown below), it all depends on what I am doing!

Just don’t change horses, or rulers for that matter, in midstream!

These are helpful in making scale models of projects.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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Sarit

549 posts in 2978 days


#14 posted 03-14-2017 09:16 AM

I usually just configure the CAD software to work in fractions with the precision you desire. I’ve switched from sketchup to fusion360 (free-ish for inventors) and its more precise and handles displaying in fractional units.

Easier to change the software than the hardware.

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Gene Howe

9772 posts in 3267 days


#15 posted 03-14-2017 12:22 PM


Measurement is the enemy of precision.

- Rick M


+1… in spades! But, for some, that concept is heresy.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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