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Alternative to using shims with a shooting board

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Forum topic by Jon_Banquer posted 1284 days ago 1092 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jon_Banquer

69 posts in 1308 days


1284 days ago

I’ve recently watched a David Charlesworth video called Precision Shooting Simplified where he advocates using shims to get stock to be square. I can see using shims as a last resort but not as my first choice or my only choice. Is there a viable alternative to using shims when using a shooting board?

The only alternatives that I can think of at the moment are a shooting board that is adjustable to compensative for irregular stock or another operation that prepares the stock for using a shooting board.

-- Jon Banquer San Diego, CA CAD / CAM programmer, CNC Machinist


6 replies so far

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swirt

1913 posts in 1471 days


#1 posted 1284 days ago

Yes there are alternatives. I have seen several (can’t think of where at the moment .. but probably here) that use a bushing in the post nearest the chute and a bolt in a bit of a slot with a handle that can be tightened at the end farthest from the chute. One I remember suggested using a nut in the end so you could use a wrench to tighten it down more snug than you could get with a T-handle. The main thing is you want the adjustable part near the far end where it is not subject to the forces from the plane which might knock it out of square.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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swirt

1913 posts in 1471 days


#2 posted 1284 days ago

Here’s a couple:
http://www.inthewoodshop.com/ShopMadeTools/Setting%20Up%20and%20Using%20a%20Shooting%20Board4.html

http://www.evenfallstudios.com/woodworks/2009/03/29/introducing-a-shooting-board-from-evenfall-studios/

If you are talking about more than just fine/small adjustments (like if you want one to swing to 45 degrees and other angles, then you would need to make an adjustable/replaceable face to the fence so that you can always slide it flush to the plane so it always supports the cut so you don’t get tearout on the piece.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

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Mario

84 posts in 1895 days


#3 posted 1284 days ago

Jon, I think this is what you are looking for, from FWW articles:
https://finewoodworking.com/FWNPDF/011214065.pdf

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Jon_Banquer

69 posts in 1308 days


#4 posted 1283 days ago

Mario,

It appears that I have to be an on-line subscriber to FWW to read the PDF you linked to.

-- Jon Banquer San Diego, CA CAD / CAM programmer, CNC Machinist

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Jon_Banquer

69 posts in 1308 days


#5 posted 1283 days ago

swirt, thanks. I’m currently following up on both links you posted.

-- Jon Banquer San Diego, CA CAD / CAM programmer, CNC Machinist

View Lalaland's profile

Lalaland

44 posts in 2478 days


#6 posted 1279 days ago

Not an expert, but it seems to me that trying to design a shooting board that you can adjust the fence to accomodate what you’re plaining at 1/1000” increments is a lesson in humility. Even getting it right at first means that the fence, if it’s wood, will move, so will have to be readjusted on a regular basis. All Mr. Charlesworth is saying is that it’s easier to just make the shooting board and use the shims to make the fine adjustments without having to constantly try to get the angle on the fince realigned. My skills have not reached the point where I can make adjustments at 1/1000” increments and it make alot of difference in the outcome. But most other experienced craftsmen, especially those that make high end things, will need the shooting board. Whether you adjust the fence or adjust the stock you’re planing makes no difference in the final outcome. IMHO.

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