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candidate for infill plane conversion, what do you all think?

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Forum topic by Marn64 posted 03-11-2017 06:39 PM 1184 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marn64

295 posts in 618 days


03-11-2017 06:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: walnut plane refurbishing

got this Craftsman Stanley no. 5 equivalent today for 8 dollars. I am thinking of converting it into an infill with black walnut and selling the parts. What do you all think?

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee


9 replies so far

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Tim

3678 posts in 1794 days


#1 posted 03-12-2017 12:50 PM

I would wait for one where the knob and tote are in worse shape. That knob looks like rosewood, the tote could either be that or lacquered, hard to tell from the picture. My advice would be that uf you don’t want this one, clean it up and sell it and wait for one where there are missing pieces, damaged frog, etc. But it’s yours to do what you like with, it’s not like you’d be ruining a collector’s item.

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Marn64

295 posts in 618 days


#2 posted 03-12-2017 09:34 PM



I would wait for one where the knob and tote are in worse shape. That knob looks like rosewood, the tote could either be that or lacquered, hard to tell from the picture. My advice would be that uf you don t want this one, clean it up and sell it and wait for one where there are missing pieces, damaged frog, etc. But it s yours to do what you like with, it s not like you d be ruining a collector s item.

- Tim


hmmm, I don’t know. Have you ever heard of rosewood handled Craftsman or Dunlap planes? I haven’t, but I have been wrong about non-stanley planes before (case and point, I once shunned Millers Falls entirely based off of my experience with a later post war one) But this looks like lacquered hardwood. The lacquer is chipping (looks like nitrocellulose, I learned this from guitar making) and I will pick some of the loose stuff off and will keep you updated. To be clear, I am not going to be trashing the tote and knob if it is rosewood, they would be great for planes made by me (I have been planning on venturing into casting stanley replicas).

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4799 posts in 3793 days


#3 posted 03-12-2017 09:39 PM

I wouldn’t !
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Tim

3678 posts in 1794 days


#4 posted 03-13-2017 04:49 PM



hmmm, I don t know. Have you ever heard of rosewood handled Craftsman or Dunlap planes? I haven t, but I have been wrong about non-stanley planes before (case and point, I once shunned Millers Falls entirely based off of my experience with a later post war one) But this looks like lacquered hardwood. The lacquer is chipping (looks like nitrocellulose, I learned this from guitar making) and I will pick some of the loose stuff off and will keep you updated. To be clear, I am not going to be trashing the tote and knob if it is rosewood, they would be great for planes made by me (I have been planning on venturing into casting stanley replicas).

- Marn64

I was just guessing based on the pictures. Yeah if it’s lacquered hardwood you’re certainly not ruining a gem if you do convert it.

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JayT

5453 posts in 2044 days


#5 posted 03-13-2017 04:59 PM

I think you are in for more work turning a cast iron plane into an infill than just building one from scratch. Start with some precision ground O1 steel and it’ll be a lot easier. Yes, you’ll spend a bit more money going that route, but will end up with a far nicer finished product for less hassle.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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Marn64

295 posts in 618 days


#6 posted 03-13-2017 11:10 PM

I think what I will do is restore this and sell it. I believe it is a Sargent or Millers Falls made craftsman. As for what JayT said, while I do want to make a dovetail infill, I don’t think I have the skills yet, I have never dovetailed wood before, much less metal.

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

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Marn64

295 posts in 618 days


#7 posted 03-14-2017 12:05 AM

By the way what is the crusty stuff all over this plane? It looks like salt corrosion or grout or something. Should I be worried about lead?

-- Benjamin, Milwaukee

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JayT

5453 posts in 2044 days


#8 posted 03-14-2017 12:13 AM

I never said dovetail. There are several ways to attach the sides to the sole of an infill plane. Check out this blog post by Don W or Part 1 and Part 2 of Ripthorn’s blog.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View Don W's profile

Don W

18518 posts in 2400 days


#9 posted 03-16-2017 12:48 AM

Its a Sargent made Craftsman.

I agree with JayT. There are several challenges with turning that into an infill. First is fitting the infill in a completely unsquare base. Then you have to mill out or fit around the frog seat. Then you need to determine how to hold the front knob in. There is not quit enough meat to pin it and I don’t trust just epoxy.

By the time you circumvent all that, you can pin or bolt some sides to a base and your good to go.

I’ve got several builds documented on my web site that should help.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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