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What is the v-notch used for in this saw horse?

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Forum topic by Jon_Banquer posted 1411 days ago 1508 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jon_Banquer

69 posts in 1435 days


1411 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

http://tinyurl.com/2f2o8mw

The answer given is: “for supporting thin work while ripping, particularly notching.”

I would appreciate if someone could post an alternative explanation that hopefully I will be able to grasp because I cannot visualize the explanation given.

Thanks in advance,

-- Jon Banquer San Diego, CA CAD / CAM programmer, CNC Machinist


8 replies so far

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2280 posts in 1552 days


#1 posted 1411 days ago

If it was a thin strip, say 8” wide, you would project the work over the V in line with the sawhorse, and cut toward the point of the V, like shopgurl says, supporting the work on each side. The most force and chance to break a thin piece is where the teeth are contacting the work, so this provides required support.

Does that help?

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1278 posts in 2363 days


#2 posted 1411 days ago

For securing round stock. For example: to cut a notch in the end of or rip round or small stock.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View Jon_Banquer's profile

Jon_Banquer

69 posts in 1435 days


#3 posted 1411 days ago

Shopguryl and justfine would you both agree that what the V notch is actually providing is support and clearance and that this is not obtainable for thin work on a sawhorse without a V notch?

-- Jon Banquer San Diego, CA CAD / CAM programmer, CNC Machinist

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jusfine

2280 posts in 1552 days


#4 posted 1411 days ago

I would agree, Jon.

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

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TopamaxSurvivor

14721 posts in 2302 days


#5 posted 1411 days ago

Sure would be handy for making a birds mouth cut on the end of a rafter if anyone cut rafters any more ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1741 days


#6 posted 1411 days ago

Jon
have you ever made any scrollsaw work the old fasion way with a deep fret saw
if you have you wuold know its excacly the same concept there is talking about

the saw http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/eclipsedeepfretsaw-11-38deep.aspx

Dennis

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2647 days


#7 posted 1411 days ago

If you have ever ripped a thin board like shiplap or the like with an 8 tooth hand saw you will see the advantage of having support at or near the area being cut. The saw must be pushed through the wood to creat the kerf and it chatters considerably on the back stroke making the board swivel and scoot around the end of the horse.
Sawing on one side or the other is a chore as the legs are in the way.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Abbott's profile

Abbott

2570 posts in 1930 days


#8 posted 1411 days ago

Yeah, that V notch looks handy for working with thin or small stock. It would work well for cutting some notches.

-- Ohh mann...pancakes and boobies...I'll bet that's what Heaven is like! ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣

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