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Forum topic by Abn101mp posted 03-09-2017 01:36 PM 309 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Abn101mp

51 posts in 430 days


03-09-2017 01:36 PM

I have a customer who wants me to build them a chimney cabinet. She wants traditional cabinet style doors to match a picture that she has found. I have never made cabinet doors routed and joined like that before . I have made my doors shaker style as I am still wet behind the ears when it comes to joinery. I am feeling a little intimidated and nervous.
I need some advice on what I should do. Is this a big undertaking for my first attempt or am I over thinking it. And if I choose to do this what bits do you recommend.
Any help and advice is appreciated.
Thank you

-- Dan,Mid-Maine


6 replies so far

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TungOil

747 posts in 333 days


#1 posted 03-09-2017 01:56 PM

Are you able to share the picture? “Traditional style” could mean different things to different readers. If these are raised panel style doors, you might need to invest in a set of cutters if you don’t already have them.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Abn101mp

51 posts in 430 days


#2 posted 03-09-2017 02:01 PM

This is the cabinet she would like. But unfinished.

-- Dan,Mid-Maine

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TungOil

747 posts in 333 days


#3 posted 03-09-2017 02:08 PM

that is a pretty common style of raised panel door. If you have a shaper you can pick up a set of cutters to raise the panel and create the cope & stile profiles. It can also be done on a router table. These cutters are readily available from multiple sources. MLCS has some inexpensive options and they ship really fast.

the other challenge here is fitting the inset doors, but FWW and others have talked about ways to do this many times so a little web research will get you educated on how to handle quickly.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Abn101mp

51 posts in 430 days


#4 posted 03-09-2017 02:24 PM

Ok. I have a TS2424 with a router table I have mounted on the wing. Joining the boards as normal then using bits as you mentioned to get the joint. Can I make the outside pieces larger than the opening then trim to fit after?

-- Dan,Mid-Maine

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TungOil

747 posts in 333 days


#5 posted 03-09-2017 02:46 PM

basically, yes, you make the door the same size as the opening then trim to fit. But I suggest you research it a bit because there is some nuance to fitting the doors properly that has been explained very well elsewhere.

For this application wood selection will be more important than with an overlay style door- it must stay straight or it will really show. If I were building this piece, I would select the straightest quarter sawn stock for the door rails and stiles and use flat sawn material for the panels. Be sure to leave room for the panel to expand when you make the doors. Space balls are handy to keep the panel from rattling.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Abn101mp

51 posts in 430 days


#6 posted 03-09-2017 02:49 PM

Ok. Thank you very much for the information and advice.

-- Dan,Mid-Maine

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