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Forum topic by poopiekat posted 10-08-2010 07:32 PM 1157 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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poopiekat

4225 posts in 3201 days


10-08-2010 07:32 PM

Well.. okay, I’ve only got one thing going on in the shop these days, a cherry armoire/display cabinet project. I’ve come to a screeching halt…all my horizontal work surfaces are tied up with laminated lumber panels still in bar-clamp, waiting for the glue to dry.
At the dental office a month ago, my Dentist fixed some minor damage to a tooth that was worn down by an adjacent porcelain tooth in a bridge. She put some bonding stuff on it, and cured it instantly with this weird ultra-violet thing.
So… I wonder… when are woodworkers going to get an adhesive that bonds in seconds, cured with UV light? It would solve all of the glue-related downtime and related time-management stuff. And no, the CA (cyano-acrylate) type of adhesives are just not there yet. I’d have the casework joinery well underway by now if not for the 5-6 hours grace period of clamping. Any ideas?

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!


7 replies so far

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NathanAllen

376 posts in 2611 days


#1 posted 10-08-2010 11:36 PM

Great topic.

Other than the now defunct Woodrite Jr. “wood welder” I can’t think of a home-shop solution that rapidly cures glue.

Faster is epoxy, but glue-ups can be stressful even with the two part mixed and waiting in an ice bath.

Elastomeric may be closer, but again not something that will cure in seconds.

As for using a dental cement and UV, probably a no go on this since the ability of wood to block UV in the lower bandwidths is significantly higher than enamel. While the carbon surface of wood is degraded by UV, the shorter the wavelength the less it penetrates. Think about how a simple powerwash will reverse 10 years of UV damage to a fence.

Interesting paper from Forest Products; http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/pdf2007/fpl_2007_kataoka001.pdf

Not a lot of recent research on cure time for hardwoods, most of it seems to focus on modified wood products, but if you want to nose around with fpl you might be able to find more than I did.

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Bob #2

3809 posts in 3488 days


#2 posted 10-09-2010 12:24 AM

The eternal quest arises agian.—-Glue that sets on command.
I believe it ranks right up there with finishes that lay down perfectly in one coat.
For what it’s worth, dental cements run in the 3-$5000.00 per pint range, not that this should deter anyone doing a cutting board.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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poopiekat

4225 posts in 3201 days


#3 posted 10-09-2010 04:10 PM

Well, okay it is sort of a pipe dream. It’s kind of like those statistics you hear about, like how you spend six months of your life waiting for traffic lights to turn green. I wonder how much down-time has elapsed for glue to dry in my own shop history? Though we all know how to multi-task, I come to a screeching halt in my small shop when glue-ups occupy my entire work space. I do believe we live in a time when adhesives with almost magical qualities are being created as we speak! Thanks, all, for the great replies! Nathan Allen: Thanks for the link! Suddenly I find myself thinking of ways to age or distress wood using UV light!!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Dark_Lightning

2635 posts in 2576 days


#4 posted 10-09-2010 04:32 PM

In the model airplane building hobby, there is a long open time CA that uses a catalyst. You put the parts together, and once they’re aligned properly, spray the catalyst on. Bam, you’re done. The stuff either steams or smokes (not sure which), it kicks so fast. Probably pretty expensive for a large project, though.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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poopiekat

4225 posts in 3201 days


#5 posted 10-09-2010 04:54 PM

True, AtomJack, about those CA adhesives. I worked in electronics manufacturing for years, and thought it odd that the various LocTite industrial adhesives, some of which cured in 15 seconds, would require that catalyzer (accelerator) spray to reduce the set time to 4 seconds. Come to think of it, though, we could really burn rubber in the shop if cure-time was taken out of the equation! Just think… welders, solderers, riveters, metal-casters…some trades expect immediate real-time processing, but gluers, painters, concrete workers just gotta find ways to fill in their time while their medium of choice finally sets.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1283 posts in 3204 days


#6 posted 10-09-2010 05:16 PM

I have a WorkRite 4000 radio frequency glue welder. 4-5 seconds is all it takes. It is well worth looking for a used WorkRite 3000 . They are more compact than the 4000. The 3000 will penetrate up to 1 1/2” and the 4000 will go to 2 1/2”. Works with PVA and laminating glues such as Unibond 800 .

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

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cutmantom

389 posts in 2502 days


#7 posted 10-09-2010 06:35 PM

try to organize your time so you can work on something else while the glue dries, for example glue up a raised panel blank then mill the rails and stiles

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