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Forum topic by Pabs posted 10-08-2010 06:48 PM 7242 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pabs

196 posts in 2918 days


10-08-2010 06:48 PM

Hi all

just moved into my new house last week and the construction projects have begun!

first one I want to tackle is some heavy duty shelving for the basement
something to keep all the boxes off the ground

wondering on design…few questions

how deep is a good shelf? 16” or more.?

I plan on building this out of 2/4 and 1/2 or 3/4 ply for the shelves. make a basic box out to the 2×4 and cover it with ply
the full width of the shelving unit will be 8 feet

now to attach that box to the vertical 2×4’s (the corners) .. everywhere I see people simply drill the box to the vertical piece… meaning the screws are the only thing holding the shelf… seems weak to me… wouldn’t cutting a dado in the vertical piece be the way to go? make the dado big enough to fit the 2×4 and the ply

and for height? I was going to leave a good 10 to 12 inches off the floor to avoid problems with humidity.. then have 3 shelves separated by about 20”

so that would be 12” + 20” + 20” +20” = 72”
the ceiling height being a little under 8 feet (96”) that would leave me with some room on the top to store whatever…
anyway, maybe 20” isn’t big enough…not sure what a typical height is

any tips or links to some nice demos would be great

thanks guys…

-- Pabs


21 replies so far

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2539 days


#1 posted 10-08-2010 09:04 PM

Are you focused primarily on function or appearance? If your primary objective is function, consider some “legs” in the front corners and middle. They add a lot of strength for not much effort or money.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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Pabs

196 posts in 2918 days


#2 posted 10-09-2010 02:03 AM

function first….
what do you mean by legs in the corners and middle?

-- Pabs

View RinnyTin's profile

RinnyTin

35 posts in 2024 days


#3 posted 06-28-2011 06:47 PM

If you have moisture problems, your framing will be touching the floor regardless of how high the first shelf is. Is the basement unfinished with open framing? If so, you can hang all the shelving off the walls and eliminate the problem of wood to floor contact. I did something along these lines:

http://www.dannylipford.com/video/simple-garage-storage-solutions/ in the garage.

I did 16” deep shelves out of 3/4 ply, I think any less isn’t that useful. As for shelf height, I’d figure out what you’re going to be storing and design accordingly. I bought a bunch of those Rubbermaid storage totes and figured the shelf height to accommodate them.

And get a dehumidifier! Dark + damp = mold.

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 2475 days


#4 posted 06-28-2011 08:35 PM

Check out The WoodWhisperer’s video titled “Racking My Brain.” Though it’s a lumber rack, the same strategy can be used for general shelving if you just add shelves.

http://thewoodwhisperer.com/racking-my-brain/

Actually I first saw this design on Woodgears, where Matthias used it for general garage shelving.

http://woodgears.ca/shelves/garage.html

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

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brtech

903 posts in 2387 days


#5 posted 06-28-2011 09:01 PM

Is the ceiling finished or open?

If it’s open, I have had great success with running a 2×4 from the floor up to a joist in the ceiling and nailing it to the joist. Then I screwed 2×4’s between the vertical 2×4’s to define the shelves. On mine, the shelves are 30” deep, 32” wide, and I put a 2×4 between the verticals (16” on center) and dropped 1/2” plywood on that, notched for the 2×4s”. Mine are 8’ wide (5 posts). . Lots of storage, cheap, solid.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

808 posts in 2314 days


#6 posted 06-29-2011 03:04 AM

Building with 2×4’s will lose alot of your storage space and most of the stuff you’ll put down there won’t really be that heavy. Rip 2×4’s in half on TS for stock and work in same design most of your weight will be supported by the stock in compression and the shelves gain incredible ridgity when boxed and panels are screwed and glued. These are some simple shelves I built for the recycling bins fron halved 2×4’s and some OSB I salvaged from a house being built. Rabbeted the stock for the panels and dadoed the legs to hold the shelves. They work great and no lost space or extra $$$ for the 2×4s

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2078 posts in 2104 days


#7 posted 06-29-2011 04:07 AM

Try this. No posts, no hangers, and no cantilevers required. They are NOT attached to the ceiling in any way. They are lag-bolted to the studs. I have done these with shelving under and over where ceiling height permits.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

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BentheViking

1763 posts in 2028 days


#8 posted 06-29-2011 04:51 AM

What do you plan on storing on this….I noticed words like heavy duty and boxes, but what exactly do you plan on storing? Regardless I am always a fan of over beefing things. I would also consider making the shelves 24 inches deep rather than 16. Easy to rip a 4×8 sheet in half and gives you depth equivalent to a standard countertop. Also in terms of the dado, I feel like ripping a dado in your boards may weaken them too much, if your worried about strenght don’t use standard drywall screws—try something heavier like lags. good luck

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

763 posts in 2321 days


#9 posted 06-29-2011 05:49 AM

Or.. you can do all three, hang from rafters, bolt to the wall and build a cart.

Each hanger is made from one 2×4 held with screws. I can move them as needed.

All the stress is sheer and can hold over 300 lbs. (tested by two people hanging from them) Space them enough to carry the load and put your long stuff there. On the walls I use adjustable heavy duty shelving that changes with whatever I can get at the time. The mobile cart holds sheet goods on the back side and has bins for cutoffs in the center and in front. Think I got the plan out of one of my books.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

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TechRedneck

763 posts in 2321 days


#10 posted 06-29-2011 06:11 AM

Holy crap, just noticed this was originally posted 263 days ago.. getting late, time to go to bed and stop reading this website!

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

808 posts in 2314 days


#11 posted 06-29-2011 11:27 AM

Oh well we might be late to the party but I just got an idea for a new lumber cart from your photo!

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

196 posts in 2918 days


#12 posted 06-29-2011 05:32 PM

yeah… it’s been a while but not too late!

TechRedneck, your bin for sheet goods, are you happy with it? I’ve been thinking of building something similar since sheet goods are such a pain to store and get too. Mine are all stacked at the front of the shop… but to get to anything is a real chore…

where did you get the plan? could you make it available to me?

thanks

-- Pabs

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

763 posts in 2321 days


#13 posted 06-30-2011 12:47 AM

Pabs The cart is a great addition to the shop, use it all the time and it tucks in when not in use, it is easy to move around the shop (when the car and truck are out).

I can’t remember where I got the plan or what book it was from, however I took some measurements for you and from the photos and notes below you should be able to put one together. I built this last year sometime.

Length = 72”
height = (not including casters) 48”
height of front bins = 18”
Depth overall = 24”

the center section is 5 and 11/16” at top and 9 and 3/4” at bottom. Cut the back of the upright at 90 degrees on one side (with the bins) and angle the back part where the sheetgoods are stored.

I believe you will use around 4 sheets of 3/4 CDX ply (nothing really fancy) Cut some strips to reinforce the bottom of the cart where you will put the casters. I would get the good urathane ones (don’t cheap out on the casters!) one set fixed and one swivel. This thing gets very heavy when loaded.

here is a front view

And.. If you are really inspired, I got the plans for this overhead clamp rack from Woodsmith Shopnotes, you can order the books off their website, I subscribe to Woodsmith mag. I love this rack, it hangs above the assembly table, clamps are always handy and out of the way. I’ve added more clamps since this was taken.

Those sliding doors behind the clamp rack are hiding storage I built for the wife. They were custom built to hold those plastic bins from Wally World. I used pressure treated lumber where it contacted any floor or wall and used plywood shelving with a 2×4 frame underneath. To save the hassle of a center support on the shelf (a whole 4×8x3/4 sheet) I used threaded rod and suspended the shelf from the floor joists. When we built the house, the joists were oversized so I don’t worry about overloading the beams.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View RinnyTin's profile

RinnyTin

35 posts in 2024 days


#14 posted 06-30-2011 05:56 PM

@techredneck that clamp rack is cool, PVC pipe?

View Pabs's profile

Pabs

196 posts in 2918 days


#15 posted 06-30-2011 06:15 PM

thanks TechRedneck!

I can definitely do something with the measurements you gave me, that’s great!

one question… the center section.. .do they run the full length of the unit (72”) ? or is there a divider in the middle?
and what does the side of the full sheets look like? what stops the sheets from sliding out? just a little lip on the edge?

-- Pabs

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