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Forum topic by Snowbound posted 03-07-2017 01:53 PM 557 views 1 time favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Snowbound

5 posts in 280 days


03-07-2017 01:53 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe

I got this old lathe from my father. He’s in his 90’s now and not able to use it anymore. When he got it from my grandmother’s basement it was missing the motor, pulleys and tool rest (although it had the tool rest mount) so he added those.

It’s a very basic model with no markings. At some point someone extended the bed from 24” to 40” by welding on rails.

I plan on getting variable speed stepped pulleys and possibly replacing the motor. Then I need to figure out where to put it and build a stand for it.

There’s a small oil cap on the top of the head stock. How often do you need to oil and how much oil do you use?

I’m sure I’ll have more questions as I get going, I haven’t used a lathe since high school shop class.


8 replies so far

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4505 posts in 972 days


#1 posted 03-07-2017 02:10 PM

When in doubt, a couple drops of light machine oil every few days (depending on frequency of use) would be my suggestion.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4800 posts in 3794 days


#2 posted 03-07-2017 03:15 PM

Check the head stock bearing/bushing for any slop. Might be just fine, but it won’t hurt to check.
What is the rpm of the existing motor?
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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Rick_M

10606 posts in 2214 days


#3 posted 03-07-2017 06:20 PM

My 20s era Goodell Pratt requires a few drops of oil every 10 minutes or so. I don’t time or measure it, I touch the headstock and if the temp is rising I add a couple drops. 3n1 is perfect although I use a shop made concoction. The plain bearings won’t like high speed so take it easy. When these were made, electric motors were new fangled and treadles were still around. These things are more a labor of love than practical although you can do basic spindle turning on them.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Snowbound

5 posts in 280 days


#4 posted 03-07-2017 08:29 PM



Check the head stock bearing/bushing for any slop. Might be just fine, but it won t hurt to check.
What is the rpm of the existing motor?

The motor is 1725 rpm.

I haven’t spent any time on it, other than a quick once over when I got home. When I wiggle the spindle side to side there’s a very small amount of play but it’s better than I would have expected. I have not tried checking for wobble yet when it runs.

Thanks,
Glen

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Snowbound

5 posts in 280 days


#5 posted 03-07-2017 08:43 PM



My 20s era Goodell Pratt requires a few drops of oil every 10 minutes or so. I don t time or measure it, I touch the headstock and if the temp is rising I add a couple drops. 3n1 is perfect although I use a shop made concoction. The plain bearings won t like high speed so take it easy. When these were made, electric motors were new fangled and treadles were still around. These things are more a labor of love than practical although you can do basic spindle turning on them.

Thanks for the info, that’s a great write up you have on your blog. I don’t really expect to do anything serious with this, it’s mainly something to play around with.

Glen

View Pete_LJ's profile

Pete_LJ

93 posts in 579 days


#6 posted 03-07-2017 09:24 PM

You may want consider using a treadmill motor. You would need the motor, controller and a potentiometer ($3 part at Radio Shack which is essentially a glorified rheostat). I did a re-power on my Delta Lathe (which I am quite happy with). See http://lumberjocks.com/Pete_LJ/blog/101954

PS As you have a lot of room with your pullies and attachment, I would use a 2 1/2” alternator pulley (with a 17mm inside diameter) on the treadmill motor. These alternator pullies are usually about 2 1/2 or 3 inches in diameter. Thus, if your driven pulley is 6” diameter then you would get a reduction in speed (driven speed of about 40% of motor speed with the 2.5” pulley). Treadmill motors usually run at somewhere between 4500 and 6000 rpm (depending on make and model). With a 2 1/2” drive pulley and 6” driven pulley, you would have a speed range of about 100 rpm to 1800 rpm (or 2400 rpm with a 6000 rpm max treadmill motor).
You can ind such alternator pullies on ebay. See http://www.ebay.com/itm/Pulley-Alternator-Fits-Delco-Remy-Ford-1-Groove-0-67-17mm-ID-2-5-63-5m-/351842630490?hash=item51eb747b5a:m:mtVxNC_2mrzSO0DJMGivK7w&vxp=mtr

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Pulley-1-Groove-0-67-17mm-ID-2-93-74-5mm-OD-Fits-Hitachi-Alternators-/351922411226?hash=item51f035d6da:g:y20AAOSw2xRYQCEX&vxp=mtr

PPS You will also need 1/2-13 LH thread nut (these can be obtained at most True Value hardware stores, Fastenal and ebay).

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Snowbound

5 posts in 280 days


#7 posted 03-08-2017 02:39 PM

That’s an interesting idea Pete, I like the idea of a variable speed motor.

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Snowbound

5 posts in 280 days


#8 posted 03-10-2017 01:25 AM

I got time to look closer at it tonight and I found some wobble when I spun the spindle. Pulling it out of the headstock I find a slight bend in the brass shaft. I’ll maybe see if I can find someone to make a new one.

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