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Bar Molding Question

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Forum topic by jevarn71 posted 10-07-2010 12:24 AM 2464 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jevarn71

83 posts in 2620 days


10-07-2010 12:24 AM

Topic tags/keywords: shaping milling mahogany question modern

I am currently in the process of building a bar. I am cutting my own bar molding and have got to a point in the process where I need some advise. Here’s what I have so far…

1. First I started with a glued-up blank:

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2. Next I cut the cove on the tablesaw:

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3. I continued with a bull-nose bit on the router-table:

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4. I then cut a rabbet on the jointer:

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5. I will use a dado set at an angle to cut the angled grove out of the bottom:

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Now my question is this. What would you suggest I use to smooth the transitions from the bull-nose round-overs on each edge to the cove in the middle? I was planning to use a scraper in the cove to smooth it out. Do you think it would be good to use the scraper for the transitions as well? I also had given some thought to getting a hollow plane, but not sure if it would do what I want. I don’t think the radius would be large enough.

Any suggestions on how to tackle this are welcome.

Jason

-- Jason, JEV Woodworking


5 replies so far

View lwllms's profile

lwllms

555 posts in 2742 days


#1 posted 10-07-2010 12:55 AM

Jason,

Hollows and rounds, the way we make them, have a radius up to an inch and a half. Old bigger size British hollows and rounds tend to have a larger radius for a given plane size. One can, in theory, measure the width of a hollow or round sole and that should also be be radius of the arc the plane will cut but don’t count on this in the bigger sizes. As to American hollows and rounds, old American firms all seem to have had their own sizing system.

Hollows and rounds will do what you’re looking for if you find the right planes. Keep in mind that a hollow will leave signature tracks at the edges of the cut and you’ll want to clean up after them with a round. From the looks of your profile, I block or bench plane might do the clean-up.

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1283 posts in 3197 days


#2 posted 10-07-2010 01:16 AM

Jason,

Very god job so far. I use automotive in-line sanders to true up curved pieces. You can do it with a convex straight hand sander very quickly for the deep curve.

Charles Neil did a video on making your own custom shaped sanding blocks. You would be amazed at how fast they will cut and shape. Below is the YouTube link:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWHBFEliNyM

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

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jevarn71

83 posts in 2620 days


#3 posted 10-07-2010 10:03 PM

lwllms,

The “signature tracks” is what I was concerned with if I used a hollow plane.

John,

I liked your idea about the inline sander so much, I just stopped by HF on my way to work today and picked one up. It was even on sale for $29.99 and I used a 20% off coupon while I was at it.

I think I might combine both ideas and make a convex “shoe” out of some rigid foam I have laying around and attach it to the sander. That should make quick work of finishing this off. I’ll post my results.

Thanks again!

-- Jason, JEV Woodworking

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jevarn71

83 posts in 2620 days


#4 posted 10-10-2010 09:26 PM

I just wanted to post an update. Using the inline sanders and a piece of rigid foam, I formed a contoured sanding block to smooth out the cove. I used the sander’s flat pad to round over the sharp edges leading into the cove. It works like a charm!

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-- Jason, JEV Woodworking

View april_luv's profile

april_luv

2 posts in 2241 days


#5 posted 10-15-2010 07:18 AM

sounds incredible, i m very excited with your finished product. because my dad want’s me to do his job. but i told him i cannot do it, it’s tough for me already. hope to see your finished product.

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