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Split top Roubo question

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Forum topic by Larry Wilson posted 03-07-2017 12:07 AM 622 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Larry Wilson

25 posts in 1616 days


03-07-2017 12:07 AM

I am looking for your thoughts on my upcoming split top Roubo build.

The big question is whether to use power tools or not. Should I just “git er done” real quick with power tools or should I practise my hand tool skills and do it all by hand. I have all the tools to do it either way (except for a large sander)

I know this forum is somewhat jaded towards hand stuff, but it is pretty tempting to just get the thing started and finished.

Thanks in advance

-- Shoot pool, not people


11 replies so far

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

618 posts in 748 days


#1 posted 03-07-2017 12:20 AM

Do you ned it done yesterday? If so, plug in and have at it.

More interested in crafting while sweating or vice versa? Get out your sharpening stones.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View lepelerin's profile

lepelerin

486 posts in 2165 days


#2 posted 03-07-2017 12:33 AM

Only yourself can answer your own question. You will certainly have people on the yes, use power tools, some on the yes, do it by hand.
If you are not sure if you want to do it by hand or with power tools, think how sure you want/need a roubo bench. It might help answering your own conundrum. Just a thought.

Good luck either way and post pictures.

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10642 posts in 2220 days


#3 posted 03-07-2017 02:09 AM

Hand tools are for people who romanticize the past or want to jerk off their ego. Power is for people who want to get things done. Practical people use both. Which one are you?

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Dan Wolfgang's profile

Dan Wolfgang

136 posts in 647 days


#4 posted 03-07-2017 02:10 AM

Go for a mix. I’m glad I bought a thickness planer for my workbench build because I believe it has allowed me to save a substantial amount of time in prepping the wood. I also used my table saw to rip some pieces for the tail vise. I flattened one of the top slabs with the thickness planer but did the other by hand. I squared all of the legs by hand. All tenons were cut by hand, but I hogged the mortises out with a drill. You don’t have to decide between one approach or the other.

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Dan Wolfgang

136 posts in 647 days


#5 posted 03-07-2017 02:11 AM

Hand tools are for people who romanticize the past or want to jerk off their ego.

Or who want to work in quiet.

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1263 posts in 1513 days


#6 posted 03-07-2017 06:01 AM

Which ever way you go be safe, efficient and accurate. That’s the way the old timers had to do it or else they were looking for another job.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

5068 posts in 2105 days


#7 posted 03-07-2017 06:08 AM

I’m thinking, “Git’er Done.” It’s not going to be a quick easy project and there’s plenty of opportunity to use both power and hand tools.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8333 posts in 1326 days


#8 posted 03-07-2017 06:12 AM

Machines can’t do everything hand tools can. Some times it’s slower. Sometimes it’s not.

I rarely use sandpaper.

I’d suggest dimensioning with machines and doing the joinery by hand.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

4515 posts in 978 days


#9 posted 03-07-2017 02:06 PM

I’m in the process of a bench build. I am a hybrid guy myself – I use whichever tool will give me the best results or the quickest depending on the task. I am using large white oak beams for my bench so I’m doing most of the milling with hand planes because they’re too big for my jointer and hard to manage by myself at any rate. If I were using a laminated top with smaller lumber though, I’d be running across the jointer and through the planer and happily. Do whatever you find more enjoyable and gets the job done well. Who cares what we think? ;-P

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1792 posts in 487 days


#10 posted 03-07-2017 02:15 PM


Hand tools are for people who romanticize the past or want to jerk off their ego.
- Rick M

... thanks, Rick!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1263 posts in 1513 days


#11 posted 03-08-2017 12:06 AM

I’ve worked with boat builders builders fitting out a 70 ft sport fishing boat. The phrase I heard many times … ” A good job costs a lot, A really good job costs really a lot.”

When it came time to fit the motors, the old timer Rod and his adze, schooled everyone in the shed.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

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