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Getting by without a jointer

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Forum topic by Chris_T posted 10-06-2010 10:01 PM 2700 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Chris_T

94 posts in 2254 days


10-06-2010 10:01 PM

Anyone who doesn’t have a jointer knows how hard it is to build things without one. I’m trying to build a jewelry box out of rough sawn walnut with no luck. I had the saw mill plane them but the faces are still not flat. So my question is how do you get the face of your boards flat?


14 replies so far

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3123 days


#1 posted 10-06-2010 10:29 PM

Do you have any hand planes? There are many who frequent these forums that do not have jointers, planers, etc., but do some excellent work with hand tools.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1546 posts in 3221 days


#2 posted 10-06-2010 10:43 PM

Possibly the closest thing to being a guru of handplanes is Chris Schwarz, the editor of “Popular Woodworking”. I just attended his classes at the Woodworking in America Conference where he demonstrated how to surface boards using hand planes. He uses three handplanes, a #5 fore plane with blade ground to an 8” radius, a #7 jointer plane, and a #4 smoothing plane. Check out his book “Handplane Essentials”; http://www.woodworkersbookshop.com/category/s?keyword=handplane+essentials

Not many woodworkers have jointers wider than 6” so these skills can be very useful.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2103 posts in 3188 days


#3 posted 10-06-2010 11:02 PM

so you don’t have a jointer, but do you have a planer? If you’ve got a planer, you can go the planer sled route. GaryK posted a blog about his a long time ago, but it got a lot of interest and appeared to work very well!

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HokieMojo

2103 posts in 3188 days


#4 posted 10-06-2010 11:07 PM

one other idea, assuming you don’t have hand planes or a power planer. To flatten the top of a blanket chest I built (see my projects if you are interested in the size), I would put a straight edge going across the board with the bulged side up. I’d slide the straight edge around and anytime I found a high spot, I’d mark it with an X. If it was REALLY high, I’d put two X’s. Then I’d hit all the X’d areas with 60 grit sandpaper. for a few minutes. Then repeat. Eventually it would start to level out and I’d do the same with 100 grit. after 100, I gave up on the X’s and just sanded the whole thing like you normally would. Probably not the best way, but it worked well enough for me.

View ND2ELK's profile

ND2ELK

13495 posts in 3234 days


#5 posted 10-07-2010 01:42 AM

When I had my custom Cabinet buisness for 9 years I never had a jointer. Look at my projects and see what I built without a jointer. I do have one now but didn’t before. You could put a L metal straight edge on your work bench, clamp your boards down and flush trim your egdes with a ball bearing straight router bit. God luck!

-- Mc Bridge Cabinets, Iowa

View newbiewoodworker's profile

newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2287 days


#6 posted 10-07-2010 02:08 AM

If its just to get them flat.. then you can do what I do: Stick it in the planer, get one side flat. Then do the other side.. Warning: Any way you do it, your 4/4 board may become 1/4…

Highschool Shop works wonders too… especially if you are friends with the teacher… lol..

Remember lad, keep fingers away from all bits, blades, and cutter knives… you only get one set…. and it doesnt help to wreck em when they are still new…

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

View HerbC's profile

HerbC

1592 posts in 2319 days


#7 posted 10-07-2010 03:45 AM

NBWW,

“Remember lad, keep fingers away from all bits, blades, and cutter knives… you only get one set…. and it doesnt help to wreck em when they are still new…”

Take my word for it, it doesn’t help to wreck them even when they’re old and decrepted (sp?)...

Be Careful!

Herb

-- Herb, Florida - Here's why I close most messages with "Be Careful!" http://lumberjocks.com/HerbC/blog/17090

View Bernie's profile

Bernie

416 posts in 2297 days


#8 posted 10-07-2010 06:00 AM

If your boards have already been planed down by the lumber mill, they must be fairly close to being flat. I know close is not good enough, but it’s a start. Hand planes would be my next choice to get the closer to flat (convex side). After they are very close, use a cabinet scraper if you have one (cabinet scrapers save a lot of sanding… do a lot of sanding if you don’t have one). For the finish, I would do some sanding, and I do mean some sanding. Mark your boards with a pencil and sand off the marks using 60 grit. Mark your boards again and repeat. Do the same with 100, 120, and 150 grit. At this point, wet your boards (don’t soak them), let them dry and hand sand out the whiskers with 180 grit paper.

-- Bernie: It never gets hot or cold in New Hampshire, just seasonal!

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2534 days


#9 posted 10-07-2010 09:00 PM

There was some very good furniture made long before we had power jointers and planers. You need to replace power tools with skill, patience and hand tools (planes).

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Chris_T's profile

Chris_T

94 posts in 2254 days


#10 posted 10-08-2010 09:13 PM

So what kind of plane would I need to get?

View newbiewoodworker's profile

newbiewoodworker

668 posts in 2287 days


#11 posted 10-08-2010 09:15 PM

A Jointing Plane. Its a big long one..

-- "Ah, So your not really a newbie, but a I betterbie."

View Chris_T's profile

Chris_T

94 posts in 2254 days


#12 posted 10-08-2010 09:29 PM

What brand/model?

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HokieMojo

2103 posts in 3188 days


#13 posted 10-08-2010 09:42 PM

an #7 or #8 will get where you need to go. current reputable brands are lie neilson and veritas. I don’t think you will want to pay for them though. a use an OLD stanley (pre WW2) would be an alternative but to save money, you will need t pay more in time (research and refurbishing).

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Chris_T

94 posts in 2254 days


#14 posted 10-09-2010 12:54 AM

Thanks everyone, knucklenut that’s a good idea. I think I might try it.

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