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Pen Turning Blowout

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Forum topic by Nic posted 10-06-2010 04:54 PM 1509 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Nic

77 posts in 2130 days


10-06-2010 04:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question turning

I recently purchased a Jet lathe and picked up the Rockler beginner 7mm pen kit in order to have a fun project to learn how to turn. I have successfully turned a Rosewood blank to a pen and a similar grained wood. I have killed in a Blow-out several others. i have killed zebrawood, a maple/walnut/purpleheart glueup blank/ and a few others. the common triat with the blowouts is that the chisel never seems to get a good bite in it before it splinters and breaks. the wood kind of spins on the madrel stopping when the chisel hits it. i try to tighten it down and it spins more.

I am turning at the slowest speed. I am using a Super Glue type of glue that came with the kit. I am going to try to spend more time with the brass tube and make sure the glue cover is better. I do have the Wolverine shapening jig for my chisels and am using different size roughing gouges to chip away the blank. My chisel rest is as close to the blank as i can get (about .5 inchs) and the chisel rest is centered to the project. I definatley want to get into multiple types of woods and do some segmented types of pens but I am getting discouraged. Any Ideas or Thoughts of things i can try.

Thank You,

Nic


12 replies so far

View MOJOE's profile

MOJOE

547 posts in 1927 days


#1 posted 10-06-2010 07:17 PM

Try to “knock off” the corners before you start turning…..maybe with a belt sander or something similar. Since the blank will be closer to round, there won’t be any sharp edges to catch…...plus, you won’t have to rough out as much so you chisels will hold an edge a little longer.

-- Measuring twice and cutting once only works if you read the tape correctly!

View interpim's profile

interpim

1132 posts in 2116 days


#2 posted 10-06-2010 07:38 PM

some woods, depending on oil content etc, will not adhere well to the brass tube. Also, make sure you are scuffing up your tubes with sandpaper before you glue them in. I like to use about 150 grit on mine. If your CA glue isn’t working for you, I would suggest you use an epoxy to set your tubes. I have had to do that before on oilier woods or woods that were a little wet still. It takes longer for them to set up, but you aren’t destroying blanks either.

After that, I only make sure my chisels are sharp… I turn with the speed up pretty high… I would say pretty close to 2500 RPM for pens. Good luck with your pens, if you have any questions ask, I am sure there are tons of folks here that are more than happy to offer advice… and remember, there are probably a dozen different ways of doing one thing. It doesn’t mean that anyone of them are wrong, just different. You have to find what works for you, and do it.

-- San Diego, CA

View JerryS's profile

JerryS

221 posts in 2268 days


#3 posted 10-07-2010 12:54 AM

I’ll add a few things to this , when you center the rest on the work make sure you account for the tool cutting area also . Another words , center the rest and tool to your work . Try taking lighter cuts to start . You may need to tighten the nut on the mandrel more , but don’t make it to tight you’ll bend the mandrel .

If you haven’t done so already practice getting used to all the different gouges and how they cut . A good material for this are 2×4’s ripped into blanks .

View Nic's profile

Nic

77 posts in 2130 days


#4 posted 10-07-2010 03:29 AM

Thank you for your input guys, i appreciate it, and as soon as i get some more brass tubes in the mail, illl try it again.

Ill try Knocking the corners down and going with a stronger glue or even epoxy (whats the dry time on that, whatever the package says?). i was roughing the tubes up with sandpaper, but i will spend a little more attention to detail on it. i will try the quicker speed and lower the center a little.

Jerry, i did also try turning a ripped down 2×4 but found the wood so soft that it was crumbling. i was able to shape it, but without a gallon of putty, it wouldnt have ever seen finishing shape, but i did find it to be a good exercise in getting a feel for what the tools do.

View davyj's profile

davyj

19 posts in 1508 days


#5 posted 10-07-2010 03:36 AM

sounded like you ment your tool rest at center, IF its like it sounds that would put the cutting edge of your tool maybe too High. have the cutting edge of the TOOL at center. I like/waste as much super glue as I use. I run enough super glue in the blank that it will run out and drip out the other end,rotate the blank 180 and do it again. THEN insert the brass tube scuffed up with sand paper (any). lot of supper glue ya say? Yes but I am sure the tube is in there to stay. IF the peice gets messed up I then turn the wood off, clean the tube,spinnin on the mandrel, with a scraper and use the tube again. I like to pass on about buying super glue. I don’t buy in the bigger bottles. I get super glue at ANY Wal mart. look back in the paint dept you will find packages of super glue tubes 4 tubes .99 cents ALL THE TIME. thats better that the “Dollar” stores !! if in the midwest and have Menard stores I have found 6 Tubes for 1.20 Isn’t that even better? Bulk CA seems to have a much shorter shelf life. as for the glue ddrippin out the other end, of course you would want it to drip p a paper towel or some real hard surface that you can take an old chisle er somthing and clean the hardend glue off. gthat I do form an old disk of steel I work over doing that. I have never and do not like the idea of using epoxy as there is just no way to not get it inside the tube then have that to contend with s’my opinion

-- retired GM/Delphi , Retired USN/USAFR

View brunob's profile

brunob

2275 posts in 2827 days


#6 posted 10-07-2010 03:45 AM

You say you’re chipping away – the gouges should be used as a shear not a chipping or scraping cut. This would account for a fair amount of ‘blowout’. Try ‘rubbing the bevel’ – the cuts will be much smoother.

-- Bruce from Central New York...now, if you'll pardon me, I have some sawdust to make.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

1723 posts in 1767 days


#7 posted 10-07-2010 04:03 AM

I think brunob has the right solution. You have to make sure to put the cutting edge at the right angle of attack…one of the old lessons that resurfaced after a 30 year hiatus from wood turning after I bought my new lathe. I had the same problem until long-term memory kicked in and I lowered the tool rest and rotated the tool so that I was “rubbing the bevel”, so I was cutting the wood instead of chipping it off.

View Nic's profile

Nic

77 posts in 2130 days


#8 posted 10-07-2010 01:26 PM

Yes, tool rest at center. I will adjust it down so the tool sits center to the project, and i looked up rubbing the bevel and i will try that. Honestly, the chipping of the corners of the wood until it goes round never made sence to me, seems it gives the wood opportunity to crack, but i guess it has to get round somehow.

I try to turn the wood off the tubes, but by the time the wood breaks, it does not have any grip to the tube and just spins and i cannot turn it off. this is what makes me think that it is probably a glueing issue. i flubbed up a number of tubes trying to pull them out of wood and had to order more.

View davyj's profile

davyj

19 posts in 1508 days


#9 posted 10-07-2010 02:47 PM

Nic the only other thing I can think of to add is that you can not get Rammy doing pens. tis that light touch with super sharp tools. then gettin close, sand paper the rest of th way. Oh and hey one of the most sensible products at Harbor freight? is the sand paper on cloth backed rolls has the rolls contained in a lil box dispenser and has 4 rolls, 4 grits, 400 being the smoothest. the rolls are 1” wide and 20 ft long

-- retired GM/Delphi , Retired USN/USAFR

View JerryS's profile

JerryS

221 posts in 2268 days


#10 posted 10-08-2010 02:46 AM

Nic

There’s a ton of turning video’s on Youtube . Jet tools has some good turning video’s that show close ups of cutting with the bevel .

Those video’s help me out a ton when I first started turning .

View rance's profile

rance

4132 posts in 1818 days


#11 posted 10-08-2010 04:17 AM

Nic, have you considered taking a pen-turning class somewhere? WoodCraft has them. There’s nothing like having someone there to watch you make an error and let you know how to correct it. Hope this helps.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Nic's profile

Nic

77 posts in 2130 days


#12 posted 10-09-2010 05:09 PM

Unfortunatley, I have to work when the class was offered. I turned a piece of cherry last night using the rubbing the bevel technique. worked very well. I also glued the Hell out of it which might have been the other problem. I went to do a zebrawood piece and snapped off the threads on my Rockler Barrel trimmer. So now i need to modify that to get back into business or buy a new barrel trimmer.

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