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Forum topic by mision56 posted 03-06-2017 03:56 PM 672 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mision56

43 posts in 417 days


03-06-2017 03:56 PM

Hi All,
I’ve noticed an indent detail in some G&G pieces that looks really interesting and I’m curious about it’s creation and whether it has a specific name?

I’ve included some photos here, and I kind of assume it’s done via router template with some kind of wedge for the increasing depth but any advice or even just the name for the technique would be appreciated!

Thanks!


10 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1504 posts in 1225 days


#1 posted 03-06-2017 04:07 PM

Did you click post before adding the photos?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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mision56

43 posts in 417 days


#2 posted 03-06-2017 04:15 PM

Yep, whoops. Just added them.

View Pezking7p's profile

Pezking7p

3217 posts in 1489 days


#3 posted 03-06-2017 05:23 PM

I guess a tapered jig with a rabbet bit would cut the last picture, just like you said. It would resemble the shape that is cut, but it would look like a wedge/shim, with the thin side of the jig at the bottom of the foot. Might need to clean up the shoulder with a hand chisel to get the corners square.

The one on the left is a really cool detail as well. Not 100% sure how to make that. Maybe cut the tapers very carefully on a band saw, then cut the bottom part with a router template, then clean everything up with a hand chisel.

-- -Dan

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

524 posts in 1383 days


#4 posted 03-06-2017 05:53 PM

Go get this book if you’re interested in how to do the details in Greene and Greene style stuff.
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/0941936961/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

There are plans for the jig you need to build the scalloped leg detail in the middle. I just built the jig myself for a couple night stands I’m working on.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

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mision56

43 posts in 417 days


#5 posted 03-06-2017 06:25 PM

Nice! Willhave to pick that up. I’m not a huge G&G fan, but there are some other elements in it I’d love to experiment with.


Go get this book if you re interested in how to do the details in Greene and Greene style stuff.
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/0941936961/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

There are plans for the jig you need to build the scalloped leg detail in the middle. I just built the jig myself for a couple night stands I m working on.

- mramseyISU


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mramseyISU

524 posts in 1383 days


#6 posted 03-06-2017 07:10 PM

That book doesn’t have plans for whole pieces in it, well it does have some overall height/width/depth stuff but it leaves it to you to figure out the details. What it does do for you is show you how to make the detail pieces in the Greene and Greene style like the scallops on the legs, cloud lift details and the breadboard ends with the splines. It also shows how to make those ebony screw hole plugs.

It’s a pretty handy book if those details interest you.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

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splintergroup

1702 posts in 1060 days


#7 posted 03-06-2017 08:33 PM

You are correct in that the last photo is done with a wedge template, I used this on several of my projects, based on a Darrell Peart design.

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

799 posts in 2903 days


#8 posted 03-06-2017 09:06 PM

Darrell Peart is the go to guy for all things Greene and Greene. He has some great resources on his website and in his books. Check out his website below:

http://furnituremaker.com/

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

747 posts in 333 days


#9 posted 03-07-2017 01:44 AM

+1 on Darrell’s books on the G&G details, he provides good guidance on how to make them. Your bottom photo is often referred to as a “Blacker leg indent” or similar, since it shows up often in the furniture they designed for the Blacker house.

There are two Blacker chairs at the Met. I was looking closely at the leg indents last time I was there and I noticed a new detail- they do not have a flat, angled bottom as we typically see them made now. They actually have a slight pillow in the center of the indent. It’s hard to see in this photo, but if you look closely you will see it.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

326 posts in 2052 days


#10 posted 03-23-2017 02:51 AM

Ok, not to say I’m an expert, but i just did a cabinet with the indents on the legs and I made up a simple jig to use. You can read about it and see a few pics in my blog.

http://lumberjocks.com/MikeDS/blog/87690

My jig is basically a copy of the ones you see the real guys using. The only addition contribution I made was cutting some inserts to be able to use the jig on legs of various widths and cutting several different height blocks to use under the top of the jig to be able to adjust the angle and therefore length of the indent by using different height spacer blocks.

If you use a guide bushing to set the offset from the side of the leg, you don’t need to cut a complex pattern template, that sits on top.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

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