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Diameter of Vertical Profile Bit

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Forum topic by FarmerintheWoods posted 03-04-2017 05:03 AM 415 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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FarmerintheWoods

36 posts in 285 days


03-04-2017 05:03 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question router shaping

Hello, this is my first post. I’ve done a bit of cabinetry in the past, nothing fancy, bookcases and such. Refinishing furniture and gunstocks. I have a new project that’s become a challenge and involves routing small pieces of hardwoods.

The wood is American black walnut. The router is a bench-mounted Hitachi M12V.

The pieces (blanks) are 1.2” x 2.5” x 5.5”. The challenge is reducing the 1.2” on one end to 0.9”, using a router bit. This will be done by routing in from both sides, basically putting an edge that’s 1/2” inch deep along a workpiece that’s effectively 2.5” wide.

To get the right profile, it looks like I have basically two choices: a vertical cove panel bit, or a tall round-nose bit, also running vertical.

The trouble I anticipate is that the axis of rotation of the bit will be parallel to the grain. I do not want the workpieces tearing out, or flying across the shop, or both.

I don’t want to wreck workpieces and overspend on bits in hopes of accidentally finding what works the best.

The basic question may boil down to this: will a larger-diameter bit be more controllable, or will a smaller-diameter be easier to work with? (I’m already used to doing small incremental passes on the other cuts.)


10 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1503 posts in 1223 days


#1 posted 03-05-2017 02:39 AM

Welcome to Lumberjocks. I am surprised that no one replied. Not sure that I have an answer but perhaps this will push this back to the top of the list and someone else will chime in.

If I understand what you are saying…you are making cuts on the end grain and are you simply using a straight bit or perhaps a rabbeting bit ? If you have not cut your blanks yet, it would be easiest to cut that before you cut them to width. That way the tear out is only at the end of the cut and you can simply trim that off as you rip the strips to their final width. If the strips are already cut, you could hold a piece of scrap behind the strip to support the end of the cut and prevent tear out.

If I misunderstand, provide a little more information and perhaps someone will have a better idea.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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squazo

51 posts in 1481 days


#2 posted 03-05-2017 03:17 AM

I dont understand. are you trying to make V shaped blocks of wood?

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FarmerintheWoods

36 posts in 285 days


#3 posted 03-05-2017 06:29 PM

The blocks begin completely rectangular, everywhere. Before routing, the end grain measures 1.2” x 2.5”. After routing (with either a round-nose bit or vertical cove bit), the end grain (still rectangular) will measure 0.90” x 2.5”. The curve of the round nose or cove bit will accomplish that transition in thickness.

My concern is over the diameter of the bit to use: will a smaller bit be more controllable than a larger one, or would it be the other way around?

View bc4393's profile

bc4393

57 posts in 978 days


#4 posted 03-05-2017 08:32 PM

Sound like your putting a half inch rabbit on both sides of the short end of the piece. Don’t know why your talking about using a cove bit. Why not a straight or rabbit bit? Clamp the piece in a wood Jorgenson clamp and make multiple passes. Just slowly go backwards against the bit. You’ll have more control and torque against the bit. The carbide will shave it down just don’t try to hog it all in one pass Do multiple light passes so it doesn’t grab ya. I’d even do that process in multiple depths steps till you get to .5

You could also bandsaw that chunk out and sand it to final size or just get it close then lightly get the excess with the router.

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jerryminer

800 posts in 1277 days


#5 posted 03-05-2017 08:58 PM

This is pretty much the same as cutting a raised panel—but the panel is small and narrow.

In general, a larger-diameter bit will cause less tear-out. The two bits you propose, though, are similar in diameter, right? And you’re planning to run the material vertically in a router table? Use a tight fence opening and a backer board and you should be fine.

Another option would be a horizontal raised panel cutter and running the stock horizontally, with either a coping sled or a backer.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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FarmerintheWoods

36 posts in 285 days


#6 posted 03-06-2017 06:52 PM

I was looking at selecting one bit out of this set, or its rough equivalent. The smallest is 3/8” diameter, the largest is 3/4” diameter.

One of these will be easier to work with than the rest when it comes to working with small pieces.

BTW, this is a set by Yonico that costs ~$28. I haven’t been able to find tall round-nose bits like this from any other supplier, but the price has me worried about quality.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1503 posts in 1223 days


#7 posted 03-06-2017 11:19 PM

I have purchased a few Yonico bits and have been happy with all of them. They aren’t Whiteside but I have had no problems so far. Certainly cannot beat the price.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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jerryminer

800 posts in 1277 days


#8 posted 03-06-2017 11:44 PM

Infinity has that 3/4×1 1/4 bit with bearing for $34.90 (part # 14-690B)

I trust Infinity. I have many of their bits. Top quality. I don’t know Yonico, but I shy away from Chinese tooling.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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FarmerintheWoods

36 posts in 285 days


#9 posted 03-06-2017 11:58 PM

So, the recommendation is for bigger over smaller? That’s what I’ll get, then. Thanks!

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

800 posts in 1277 days


#10 posted 03-07-2017 12:17 AM

Yes—less tear-out and less chatter with a larger diameter

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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