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Biscuit vs "Domino" Question?

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Forum topic by jimintx posted 03-03-2017 11:16 PM 1596 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jimintx

512 posts in 1422 days


03-03-2017 11:16 PM

I have had a biscuit jointer for years, and think it is a very good tool. It provides excellent joints for me, in numerous projects.

My question is this:
Why would I want to ditch my biscuits and that cutting tool to use the Domino system?
What would I really gain?

I will appreciate reading your input.

-- Jim, Houston, TX


26 replies so far

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8323 posts in 1324 days


#1 posted 03-03-2017 11:32 PM

Biscuits are for little more than alignment. Loose tenons are a viable joinery method when strength is required.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Loren

9631 posts in 3486 days


#2 posted 03-03-2017 11:45 PM

Make a furniture piece with loose tenon
joints and you’ll get the idea. Loose tenons
are pretty strong and provide lateral
play in the joint, unlike dowels.

I use dowels and/or screws for most work.

I making chairs I’ve sometimes used biscuits
where the only other feasible joint would be
a loose tenon. The domino has that fancy
fence that allows for a lot of control of
the angle of the mortise. Biscuit joiners,
better ones, have a similar fence but the
biscuit doesn’t go in the tight areas a domino
will go.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

652 posts in 3159 days


#3 posted 03-03-2017 11:56 PM

As others have mentioned biscuits provide mainly alignment where loose tenons or specifically Dominos make stronger joints. For many the Domino is a game changer, I use both the 500 and 700 and they are my preferred method of joinery though often other joinery is a better choice, but I haven’t used a single biscuit since buying the 500 6 or so years ago and finally sold my Lamello last year since it was clear that Dominos were superior in basically every situation.

View pottz's profile

pottz

2230 posts in 822 days


#4 posted 03-04-2017 04:23 AM

well I use both and there purposes are totally different,if you want to join two boards together I use a bisquit if I’m building a chair or table its the dominoes role.i would never part with either.if you can only afford one id go with the bisquit joiner about 800 dollars cheaper!

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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jimintx

512 posts in 1422 days


#5 posted 03-04-2017 04:47 AM

Hmm, so, thanks for the input. I suppose what it amounts to for me is, jus’ not going to worry about dominos. I’ve never wished for one, nor even knew what it was till recently.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

10634 posts in 2218 days


#6 posted 03-04-2017 06:56 AM

If I made furniture for a living I would own a Domino.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Tabletop's profile

Tabletop

127 posts in 585 days


#7 posted 03-04-2017 07:44 AM

AHuxley, if you could only have one, 500 or 700, which would it be and why?

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AHuxley

652 posts in 3159 days


#8 posted 03-04-2017 08:12 AM



AHuxley, if you could only have one, 500 or 700, which would it be and why?

- Tabletop

Short answer the 500. When the Seneca adaptor came out I sold my 500 bought a 700 and the adaptor but later sold the adaptor and bought another 500. The adaptor works it just took away some of the speed and ease of use for me but one certainly can get away with that option. I say the 500 because if one mainly builds furniture the 500 will do the vast majority of the joints needed the exception being some chair joints but some have used the 500 to make great chairs but I worry about the smaller loose tenons in racking situations. It never fails when there are a group of people at my house the largest person with the least mechanical sympathy seeks out my most delicate chairs and proceeds to ride them like a kid chugging Mountain Dew and mainlining high fructose corn syrup riding a rocking horse. The adaptor and 700 is not exactly a cheap either, the 700 set, adaptor and all three tenon/cutter assortments will run the better part of $2400, the 500 and tenon/cutter assortment is about $1100 cheaper and will cover 80+% of the needs of the average hobby furniture maker for the rest more traditional joints is still available.

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Tabletop

127 posts in 585 days


#9 posted 03-04-2017 10:18 AM

Thanks for the input, AHuxley, but what if your intended purpose was for tables. I was thinking skirts to legs and breadboard ends. The last conference table I did was 14’ walnut with breadboard ends about 7” wide. The m/t joints took longer than the table top assembly from rough cut to glue up. I do probably 5 – 6 kitchen tables(mostly 4-8 person) a month and two or three conference size tables a year(12’ or better).

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4758 posts in 2331 days


#10 posted 03-04-2017 12:31 PM



well I use both and there purposes are totally different,if you want to join two boards together I use a bisquit if I m building a chair or table its the dominoes role.i would never part with either.if you can only afford one id go with the bisquit joiner about 800 dollars cheaper!

- pottz

Same here, I don’t see them as the same tool. Loose tenons are really nice, and the Domino does those well….but the biscuit joiner still has a lot of uses.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View jplemons's profile

jplemons

38 posts in 1023 days


#11 posted 03-04-2017 05:12 PM

I’d think you can use a Domino for anything a biscuit would do, but you can’t use a biscuit for everything the Domino will do.

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Carloz

979 posts in 429 days


#12 posted 03-04-2017 05:56 PM



I d think you can use a Domino for anything a biscuit would do, but you can t use a biscuit for everything the Domino will do.

- jplemons


With exception that biscuits are used a lot on plywood in cabinetmaking, where Domino does not work. Plus a pack of biscuits costs 5-10 times less than corresponding pack of Dominoes.

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

652 posts in 3159 days


#13 posted 03-05-2017 12:50 AM



Thanks for the input, AHuxley, but what if your intended purpose was for tables. I was thinking skirts to legs and breadboard ends. The last conference table I did was 14 walnut with breadboard ends about 7” wide. The m/t joints took longer than the table top assembly from rough cut to glue up. I do probably 5 – 6 kitchen tables(mostly 4-8 person) a month and two or three conference size tables a year(12 or better).

- Tabletop

That specific use would have me lean toward the 700. The easiest thing to do is compare the M/T size you would use to the Domino sizes and choose from there. Note more often than not I use a Domino slightly thicker than I would a traditional M/T.

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AHuxley

652 posts in 3159 days


#14 posted 03-05-2017 12:51 AM


I d think you can use a Domino for anything a biscuit would do, but you can t use a biscuit for everything the Domino will do.

- jplemons

With exception that biscuits are used a lot on plywood in cabinetmaking, where Domino does not work. Plus a pack of biscuits costs 5-10 times less than corresponding pack of Dominoes.

- Carloz

What part of box making will a biscuit work for that a Domino not?

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Tabletop

127 posts in 585 days


#15 posted 03-05-2017 02:12 AM

Thanks again AHuxley. I’m leaning towards the 700

showing 1 through 15 of 26 replies

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