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Help Identifying This Tree/Wood, please.

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Forum topic by Izzy68 posted 03-03-2017 05:47 PM 1440 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Izzy68

42 posts in 2158 days


03-03-2017 05:47 PM

Topic tags/keywords: wood type wood identification fruit trees fruit wood identify wood type tree type

This tree fell down outside my apartment building in Los Angeles. I asked the landlord if he was going to re-plant it since it had fallen due to the soil eroding out from underneath it. When he said “No” I cut it up and took the wood. It seems to be some sort of fruit tree, but I’d like to know whether anyone knows for sure exactly what it is. I’ve included pictures of a sister tree, a cross section, bark, leaves & flowers (buds), if that helps. The bark is thick and deep, and the wood itself is close-grained and a gorgeous tannish/red.

This is my first stop, hoping that someone will be familiar with this ornamental tree and that I won’t have to slice sections with a razor and go to the microscope… where I probably wouldn’t know what I was doing, anyway!

Thanks.

Iz





-- Jimmy


14 replies so far

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3917 posts in 1818 days


#1 posted 03-03-2017 06:03 PM

Looks like cherry.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

5558 posts in 1189 days


#2 posted 03-03-2017 06:09 PM

The bark looks different from the cherry trees common around here but the blooms and the leaves sure look like cherry.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 698 days


#3 posted 03-03-2017 08:10 PM

I think perhaps we are looking at a black gum tree.

View Izzy68's profile

Izzy68

42 posts in 2158 days


#4 posted 03-03-2017 10:33 PM

yeah, it’s a tough one to place. For each type there’s one glaring difference: bark, leaves, color, etc.

-- Jimmy

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

3917 posts in 1818 days


#5 posted 03-04-2017 02:56 PM

Black gum grows on the southeast coast I think.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2160 posts in 1438 days


#6 posted 03-04-2017 03:40 PM

Based upon the flowers, leaves and the smooth bark on the new growth, I would definitely say it is in the same family as cherry, pear and plum (Rosacea). If it is a black cherry, there will be some little white hairs along the main vein on the back of the leaf. If you have never noticed any fruit on it, it is likely an ornamental variety that was bred for landscape purposes only and might be some imported variety of cherry.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1752 posts in 2526 days


#7 posted 03-04-2017 03:47 PM

I would say that it a type of pear.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View oldwood's profile

oldwood

143 posts in 1294 days


#8 posted 03-05-2017 04:33 AM

Not black gum for sure. Wood looks like bradford pear but bark and shape not so bottom line, I don’t know.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 642 days


#9 posted 03-05-2017 04:39 AM

Yes it is a pear. There is a lot of them in So.Ca. They bllom beautifully but no fruits :-(

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 698 days


#10 posted 03-07-2017 12:06 AM


Black gum grows on the southeast coast I think.

- mahdee

The Arbor Day Foundation has planted a great number of Black Gum Trees all over California. The bark is too thick for pear …

View Iwoodtryharder's profile

Iwoodtryharder

5 posts in 510 days


#11 posted 03-07-2017 12:37 AM

I live in San Jose and a neighbor had a tree “exactly like that go down late last year. A couple of weeks ago he finally cut it up so it could be hauled away. I was taken by the color and grain and asked my wife, who is a Master Gardener, what it was. She said it was a Bradford pear so that’s two votes there. I have a chunk of the trunk aging by my lathe until it is ready to spin.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2160 posts in 1438 days


#12 posted 03-07-2017 01:55 AM

Flowers are all wrong for black gum (tupelo). Branching pattern is all wrong and the bark is way too thick and furrowed for Bradford pear.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 698 days


#13 posted 03-07-2017 12:30 PM

... whatever!

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Ocelot

2003 posts in 2689 days


#14 posted 03-07-2017 04:07 PM

The bark does not look like the cherry we have around here in N. Alabama. Young bark is silvery and smooth. Older bark gets rough, but not that thick. Of course, trees my grow thicker bark in dry climates.

Also, the blooms sticking up like that does not look like our cherry.

Bradford pear rarely gets that large here and almost always has a symmetrical form, but I imagine individual trees might have different shapes.

-Paul

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