LumberJocks

Addendum to "You've got to try this"

  • Advertise with us

« back to Coffee Lounge forum

Forum topic by Roger Clark aka Rex posted 10-03-2010 07:40 PM 2347 views 0 times favorited 39 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Roger Clark aka Rex's profile

Roger Clark aka Rex

6940 posts in 2130 days


10-03-2010 07:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question modern

One of the subject discussed on the “You’ve got to try this” multiple faceted conversations was a rationale for and against the metric system of measurement.

Here are 2 pictures and a simple question: Which measuring instruments are easier to read?

Measuring Tape
Stainless Rule

No prizes, no pressure, just a general question for thought.

You all have a great day.

-- Roger-R, Republic of Texas. "Always look on the Bright Side of Life" - An eyeball to eyeball confrontation with a blind person is as complete waste of Time.


39 replies so far

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1810 days


#1 posted 10-03-2010 07:56 PM

mm
no doubt

Dennis

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

3480 posts in 1889 days


#2 posted 10-03-2010 08:01 PM

Roger,
I have a tough time with metric, and not being familar with it also, just give me the other one…...lol.
It’s what I’ve learned, and it’s what I know…Took me a long time to realize that a meter is longer than a yard

-- " I started with nothing, and I've still got most of it left".......

View FredG's profile

FredG

140 posts in 2392 days


#3 posted 10-03-2010 08:13 PM

For right handed people the yellow tape measure will be, like many others, upside down in use.
The white one is for left and right handed people. So white wins.
Second picture.
No need for half millimeters. Inches up to a sixteeth. Draw.

-- Fred

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1802 days


#4 posted 10-03-2010 08:53 PM

Back in 1959 we were introduced to the metric system for 1 quarter in high school. I never heard much about it until I checked in here and found that everybody else in the world uses it except the good old USA.
The US is quickly becoming a third world nation. Pretty soon everyone will be heading south to Mexico to take advantage of their welfare system or if this global warming thing kicks in, we will be in Canada teaching them to say Shit Howdy y’all. Sign me up for that socialized medicine. Yee Haa! The south shall rise again!

View jack1's profile

jack1

1940 posts in 2722 days


#5 posted 10-03-2010 09:01 PM

Metric has it’s place and the use of base 10 (the multiples of ten – 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100, 1000 etc.) like our money, is simple to use. The problem is that we are really used to fractions. It’s not easy to show 1/8 of a cm, dm, or M ! ;0)
I do like white for a tape measure though.

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View patron's profile

patron

13110 posts in 2036 days


#6 posted 10-03-2010 09:10 PM

i can work in either
but don’t convert well

so i lay two together
to get the other one

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View jack1's profile

jack1

1940 posts in 2722 days


#7 posted 10-03-2010 09:15 PM

Works ok with whiskey bottles I guess… ;0)

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

1766 posts in 1804 days


#8 posted 10-03-2010 09:51 PM

I use English Engineering Units in the shop, simply because of the ubiquity of that style of measuring tools. In the lab, in school, we were all metric. All electromagnetic theory and design I did was metric…until I took the device into the shop to have it made, then it had to be converted to inches. Silly, plus it takes dimensioning and tolerancing to a whole new level. We were spin- balancing a large device at work (4000+ pounds) and the units for the moment of inertia were slug-feet squared. I just looked at the equipment like I’d stepped into the twilight zone for a moment. I was thinking kilogram-meter squared, since all my college edumacation was metric.

I think where the US fell down on the metric system was the canning industry. The people who design cans (seriously) look at height and width to develop a can that looks “right” for the product so contained. For a good example, look at Budweiser cans and then Michelob Ultra cans. The Ultra is a tall skinny can, ostensibly to make people think they’ll stay skinny drinking it.

Anyway, for metric conversion back in the day, people cried like little kids because they didn’t want to compare 355 mL to 12 ounces, or comparison shop can weights when they are 340 grams Vs 454 grams…since that’s 12 oz Vs 16 oz. I say Americans are mathematically lazy. Of course, that’s not an isolated trait- the ancient Greeks called the bugs centipedes because they stopped counting at 14- the minimum number of legs for the critter.

View Roger Clark aka Rex's profile

Roger Clark aka Rex

6940 posts in 2130 days


#9 posted 10-03-2010 10:37 PM

lilredweldingrod:
A lot of truth in what you say – who knows?

Atomjack:
I went through the change to metric in England during the early 70’s. Trying to convert some of the formulas and dimensions was a No No. It did not take long for people to make the change and most thought it was easier than they expected. You soon find out that a lot of the Imperial system does not make a lot of sense and is that system is pretty well dying.
There are many examples where the US got stymied to change and a lot of it WAS due to sales strategy and perception.
One thing where people have the wrong concept is that you DO NOT convert dimensions from one system to the other because yoour eyeballs will never be able to read all the decimal points the would be conversions produced.
It is not really a hard thing to get your head around and ignoring it will make us self contained country that uses non conformist measurements, we’ll have no world customers.

Jack1:
Give up your gallon of whisky and go for 5 Litres – its more!!!

-- Roger-R, Republic of Texas. "Always look on the Bright Side of Life" - An eyeball to eyeball confrontation with a blind person is as complete waste of Time.

View chaim's profile

chaim

36 posts in 2424 days


#10 posted 10-03-2010 10:47 PM

I moved to a metric country so I had to get used to it! After a couple of years I can’t for the life of me figure out why someone would want to stay with the English system?
Perhaps so they can boast “I can add fractions!”
Seriously, I’ve heard complaints by shop forman on the pro forums that they can’t find workers who can add and use a ruler properly anymore.
I think it’s time to move on unless you want to revert and start weighing things in “stone” like an old Scottish girl oh mine told me.
LOL
Chaim

View miles125's profile

miles125

2179 posts in 2701 days


#11 posted 10-03-2010 10:51 PM

Both systems are equally valid. A self invented system would be too so long as you knew equivalents of other systems you might need to translate to.

-- "The way to make a small fortune in woodworking- start with a large one"

View miles125's profile

miles125

2179 posts in 2701 days


#12 posted 10-03-2010 11:13 PM

””Perhaps so they can boast “I can add fractions!””

That’s sort of a misnomer. Both systems have fractional parts. You could say two millimeters is one fifth of a centimeter. And one third of a meter is 333.33 millimeters. But both systems need to be calculated to decimal equivalents of any fractions for accuracy in math purposes.

-- "The way to make a small fortune in woodworking- start with a large one"

View Brit's profile (online now)

Brit

5236 posts in 1538 days


#13 posted 10-03-2010 11:27 PM

I’m old enough to have learnt both systems here in the UK. When I left school I did a 4 year engineering apprenticeship and then worked as a Design Draughtsman where I also used both systems. I’m comfortable with both of them which is just as well as all the best tools are made in the US or Canada. So as well as having to pay the import tax on top of the cost of the tool, I’ve also got to buy an English set of Allen keys and wrenches etc. to adjust them with. :-)

In terms of readability, my vote goes to the white tape measure. I hate trying to read steel rules unless they are the satin chrome ones.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Justin's profile

Justin

118 posts in 1664 days


#14 posted 10-03-2010 11:59 PM

I’ve used imperial for ever but after i started trades school this year I had to start using both because half the machinery is imperial and others is metric. so i find they are both easy to read. I rather imperial tape and as for color i don’t find it really maters to me.

View terrilynne's profile

terrilynne

833 posts in 1589 days


#15 posted 10-04-2010 12:52 AM

#1

-- Terri, Rocky Mountain High Colorado!

showing 1 through 15 of 39 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase