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stumped removing jointer knives

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Forum topic by Camper posted 10-02-2010 04:12 AM 2664 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Camper

232 posts in 2320 days


10-02-2010 04:12 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jointer

I am trying to remove the knives from a jointer which requires a very thin wrench to get into the tiny slot in the cutter head. Any ideas other than grinding down an appropriately sized regular wrench? I do not have a grinder. Unfortunately I do not have the proper wrench that probably came with the jointer either as i got it used. Thanks in advance.

-- Tampa-FL


12 replies so far

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1614 posts in 2756 days


#1 posted 10-02-2010 05:52 AM

“Ignition wrenches” are thin.

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

View Moron's profile

Moron

5032 posts in 3358 days


#2 posted 10-02-2010 06:03 AM

use a belt sander or a file to get the wrench you have to fit in that tiny slot. I suggest that when you do get the wrench to fit, that you paint it an odd colour so as not to “loose” it, and repeat the process.

a good file and enough “time”, the “fat” wrench will fit

2 cents

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Canadian Woodworks's profile

Canadian Woodworks

702 posts in 2534 days


#3 posted 10-02-2010 05:47 PM

I just ground down a mastercraft wrench for my jointer

Just read no proper grinder…... hmmmm do you have a angle grinder could use it with a grinding wheel….

excuse to get a new tool!

-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com

View cutmantom's profile

cutmantom

389 posts in 2499 days


#4 posted 10-02-2010 06:35 PM

if you can find a source for parts for your machine you should be able to get a wrench there

View Camper's profile

Camper

232 posts in 2320 days


#5 posted 10-02-2010 07:03 PM

hmmm…does not sound like there is an “easy” way. I am going to take it apart so i think I may just take the cutter head out see if I can drag that around rather than the whole unit…what to do…what to do..

thanks for all the suggestions…

-- Tampa-FL

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4225 posts in 3199 days


#6 posted 10-02-2010 09:27 PM

Those flat bicycle wrenches, the kind that fit 10 or 12 sizes, will sometimes work in a pinch.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Camper's profile

Camper

232 posts in 2320 days


#7 posted 10-03-2010 04:11 AM

well after all a 5/16” wrench from an auto store fits in the tight spot. I sanded it down with 60 grit paper to give me some extra room but not necessary. Removed 11 of the 12 screws but of course one would not budge (tried wd-40, whacking it with a punch and a hammer) and finally stripped it :(. The usual nightmare of the home mechanic….The other 11 screws are not in excellent shape either so I think I will need to get some new ones.

Now I have to figure out how to get the last one out. Any suggestions?

By the way a 60 grit sandpaper on a sanding wheel seems to work just as good as a grinder (though I never really used a grinder)...watch for the fireworks though :)

-- Tampa-FL

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2634 posts in 2573 days


#8 posted 10-03-2010 04:26 AM

If it is a hex head screw, and you didn’t use a box end wrench the first time, grind one down and try that. Otherwise, you’re going to have to remove the cutter head…which is a PITA but possible. And will require more work later.

As glivinston says, Snap-On works well. If that’s a problem logistically, you can get an equivalent tool at Sears. They have a professional grade tool that looks (and costs) the same. Since I have Snap-On myself, I can’t vouch for the Sears equivalent, but they sure look the same. If you break it, they’ll replace it, though.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2405 posts in 2390 days


#9 posted 10-03-2010 05:13 AM

I ended up grinding – sanding one of my snap on wrenches down as it was still too thick.

Painted the whole wrench red and now I can find it easily.

Good luck!

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View Camper's profile

Camper

232 posts in 2320 days


#10 posted 10-03-2010 06:37 AM

FINALLY the last screw is out….I had to saw a kerf width off the top of the screw against the cutterhead to release the pressure so the gib and the knife could slide out. Luckily once it was out I could hand turn the stripped screw out :)
A little elbow grease but all is well.

As for replacement screws…can I just get matching ones from anywhere or would they need to be ordered from the manufacturer? I suspect any screw matching size and pitch should work but I figure I should check before I have a couple of knives flying at me…

As a final note 8mm fits better than 5/16th, which may have been a part of the problem to begin with…

Thanks for all your suggestions.

-- Tampa-FL

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4225 posts in 3199 days


#11 posted 10-03-2010 06:49 AM

Now that the problem seems to have been solved, I’ll ask this related question: Has anyone encountered LEFT-hand threads on jointer knife-setting screws? I seem to recall one unit I’ve worked on that drove me crazy when I replaced the knives….

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Camper's profile

Camper

232 posts in 2320 days


#12 posted 10-03-2010 07:07 AM

the whole thing is strange enough since you are turning things “right” to “loosen” the knives and its not real clear until you look at drawings and realize that you are actually “tightening” the screw to release the pressure between the cutterhead and the knife…now you are saying that some of them actually require turning the other way?

well this is my first one so i cannot say i have seen one…in my case you had turn them “right” (towards the fence)...

-- Tampa-FL

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