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Square coffee table with spiral/windmill layout on top?

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Forum topic by LiveEdge posted 03-01-2017 12:56 AM 1026 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LiveEdge

565 posts in 1460 days


03-01-2017 12:56 AM

This week I was lying in bed before waking and it hit me that I’d like to build a square coffee table that would allow our ottomann to slide under. The vision I had was to have a spiral or windmill layout of four or six inch wide pieces of wood to decorate the top. However, I realized that would introduce side to end joinery and could be problematic with expansion and contraction. Luckily I live in a pretty stable climate (pacific northwest) when it comes to humidity, but wondered how one would go about doing this? Would I fix thin pieces to a stable substrate? would I limit myself to stable wood and glue up in full thickness? Curious what people thought.


12 replies so far

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papadan

3584 posts in 3208 days


#1 posted 03-01-2017 01:42 AM

A diagram or something would help to understand what you want to do.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5468 posts in 2653 days


#2 posted 03-01-2017 04:11 AM

Stable climate in the Pacific NW? Yeah, like always wet. February was something else.

I’m 1+ with papadan, I need a picture to conceive the design.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

812 posts in 1281 days


#3 posted 03-01-2017 07:22 AM

Sounds like a veneer project to me.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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jerryminer

812 posts in 1281 days


#4 posted 03-01-2017 07:35 AM


... I live in a pretty stable climate (pacific northwest) when it comes to humidity…- LiveEdge

I just looked up humidity values for Seattle. According to the info I got from the Web, indoor RH can vary between 40-70%.

According to the Shrinkulator, a piece of flat-sawn red oak—-as an example—can shrink as much as 1/4” per foot of width with that change in RH.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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LiveEdge

565 posts in 1460 days


#5 posted 03-01-2017 03:54 PM

While this isn’t the exact pattern I’m looking for, it expresses the joinery I would be thinking about.

http://www.polyvore.com/cgi/img-thing?.out=jpg&size=l&tid=147205787

All I can tell you Jerry is I’ve never had a piece of furniture fail or show movement in my house. Now it’s possible it’s because I’ve constructed them well ;), but we don’t have RH and temperature changes here that I experienced on the East Coast.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7783 posts in 2638 days


#6 posted 03-01-2017 03:58 PM

It is a simple project if you use a plywood substrate and parquetry or marquetry to make the pattern.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5468 posts in 2653 days


#7 posted 03-01-2017 04:04 PM

Veneer, or attach wood top pieces in a manner that lets them move. I’m thinking rustic cut nails.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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LiveEdge

565 posts in 1460 days


#8 posted 03-01-2017 04:04 PM

So maybe my question is why the wood in parquetry doesn’t move like we would expect in other woodworking applications? Is it the thickness or the wood? Is it the species typically used? Why don’t we expect cracking along all the crazy cross grain joints?

I guess I don’t work much with substrates. Most of my furniture is full thickness panels and so one must account for possible wood movement (breadboards, etc). I need someone to give me some learnin’. :)

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papadan

3584 posts in 3208 days


#9 posted 03-01-2017 04:59 PM

I would use full thickness boards and use dowels for the end grain joints and biscuits for the side grain joints as well as the frame around the Spiral/pinwheel center. Make sure your wood is dry to start with and you wont have any trouble.

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shipwright

7783 posts in 2638 days


#10 posted 03-01-2017 11:15 PM

Parquetry is done with veneer. It doesn’t have the power to move on anstable surface like plywood.
Like the shop cabinet I recently posted.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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LiveEdge

565 posts in 1460 days


#11 posted 03-02-2017 12:02 AM

That looks awesome. But Mr. Google tells me that parquetry uses solid wood while marquetry uses veneer. Don’t kill me if that’s either right or wrong, you obviously have some skillz (and knowledge) there with that awesome bench. :) Let’s say I WANT to use wood thicker than veneer (for some reason I just don’t like veneer), would the concept still be gluing pieces down on a substrate? I read an article about parquetry by someone who does high end floors and that’s what it sounded like.

https://www.ft.com/content/1ea32072-ef7e-11e6-ba01-119a44939bb6

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shipwright

7783 posts in 2638 days


#12 posted 03-02-2017 02:46 AM

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parquetry

Parquetry really means the type of graphic. It can refer to blocks as in flooring or veneer as in furniture.
Parquetry generally refers to geometric patterns whereas marquetry refers to more designs that are more “picture like”.
You could use thicker material but the thicker it is, the more problems you will have with movement. That’s the value of veneer. The word “veneer” gets a lot of bad press in some circles but IMHO the finest furniture ever built was veneered and it was the veneer work that made it the finest.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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