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Forum topic by RickR posted 2396 days ago 797 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RickR

19 posts in 2406 days


2396 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: hand planes question plane sharpening fettling

So I was looking through my dad’s toolshed and he showed me two hand planes he has. There were little to no markings on them, but here’s what I’ve been able to figure out.

One is a a No. 4 – but it doesn’t say Stanley or anything anywhere, neither does it have any patent markings, etc. Unless I’m not looking the right place.

He also has a “Bailey” No. 6 – which I’m guessing is a fore plane. Like the no. 4 – there’s no markings on this beyond the “Bailey” and the “No. 6” on it.

I think they can both use some new wood handles, and definitely some tuning. Might even be worth it to spring for some new blades. My questions was twofold. first – do y’all have any good resources online (read: free) that explain the parts of the plane, how to disassemble and reassemble correctly and what the various adjustments do? If it goes over how to properly fettle a plane that’s even better.

second – how does a No. 6 Fore Plane differ from a No. 7 Jointer. I’m preparing for a project where I need to joint some edges so I can edge glue some boards together (more on that later in the projects section)

Can I use the No. 6 for jointing?

-- - living vicariously through lumberjocks


11 replies so far

View Ethan Sincox's profile

Ethan Sincox

765 posts in 2799 days


#1 posted 2396 days ago

Planes have been discussed ad nauseum on this site… lots of projects where planes were refinished and several blogs on tuning and restoring planes. I’d suggest doing a search on Lumberjocks for “plane” and “tune” or “restore” or some such combination. You’re bound to find quite a bit of info.

-- Ethan, http://thekiltedwoodworker.com

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4435 posts in 2587 days


#2 posted 2396 days ago

A #6 is 18 inches long and a #7 is 22 inches long. As RHM said there are numerous forums and blogs oon lplane restoration.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Ethan Sincox's profile

Ethan Sincox

765 posts in 2799 days


#3 posted 2396 days ago

And, of course, you can find out a ton of useful info on Stanley planes iat Patrick's Blood and Gore.

-- Ethan, http://thekiltedwoodworker.com

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3962 posts in 2689 days


#4 posted 2396 days ago

Plus B&G is a hoot.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2622 days


#5 posted 2395 days ago

You can certainly use the #6 to joint…it’s only 4” shorter than a jointer. I just read a blog on Fore planes in which Chris Schwarz reviewed some early text indicating that the Fore was originally used in England as a jack was used in the US, but the heavier #6 makes the job that much easier. For your use – jointing – it really becomes an issue of how you grind the blade. You’ll want a relatively flat (for edges) to mild curve, rather than a larger curve to remove stock quickly. With a couple/few different blades, you could use your fore for various purposes!

I know Mike L. has a fore plane…wonder if he’ll be by to comment on its use…

For more info on tuning check out the various woodworking magazine sites and look for articles, as well as other independent sites.

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View RickR's profile

RickR

19 posts in 2406 days


#6 posted 2394 days ago

Thanks for the replies guys,
and you’re quite right – as a newbie – I should be searching, not hitting the new post button.. just excited to join the community – never had nearly a dozen welcomes on my profile so soon after joining any forum – regardless of the topic.

Turns out I also had a resource at home – had the June 2007 issue of Popular Woodworking sitting on my night table.. finally checked it out on the train this morning and it has a really great introduction to some of the background of iron bench planes, along with an explanation of the anatomy of a bench plane, detailing some of the differences between the Bailey design and the premium Bed Rock designs as well. Not to mention walking through some of the process of fettling the planes. If you have a chance to check it out, it’s a nice introduction. I’ll be checking out some of the other resources y’alll pointed me to.

-- - living vicariously through lumberjocks

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2622 days


#7 posted 2394 days ago

Who said you shouldn’t be posting! You should post everything and anything you’d like to!

Hit the post button!

Another good reference is Peter Korn’s book called something like…A Woodworker’s Guide to Hand Tools

Very good info there. A used copy would probably set you back under $10.

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View TomK 's profile

TomK

504 posts in 2500 days


#8 posted 2394 days ago

Rick, you must be accustomed to some of those snobbish tech forums! I’m a newbie here too, but have never been admonished to “do a search first” before posting. Just ask! These guys are great, and this is the best woodworking forum I’ve experienced. Very friendly with a wealth of experience! I agree with RHM and Douglas, Patricks Bood and Gore is educational, and very entertaining.

BTW, NYC Firefighters Rock, and I salute you! Welcome.

-- If you think healthcare is expensive now, wait until it's free! PJ O'Rourke

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3962 posts in 2689 days


#9 posted 2394 days ago

Rick,
Here is a link the last installment to my plane rehab which has further links to two old hand plane restorer/bloggers David Pruett and WayneC’s methodologies. Also of interest is WayneC’s link to Craftsman Studio which has Hock aftermarket blades and chipbreakers at less than at Ron Hock’s site. They also have Lie-Nielsen stuff and a host of other hand tool goodies. Bill Kohr, the proprietor, has been very helpful in responding to e-mail questions instantaneously, and in shipping his product nearly as fast. And the shipping, at least for the current moment is free.
I heartily recommend both the Hock and Lee Valley replacement plane blades as a worthy update to older planes.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2622 days


#10 posted 2394 days ago

Oh yeah – check out WayneC's Handplane Web Resource List , as well as his many of his other blogs too

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View RickR's profile

RickR

19 posts in 2406 days


#11 posted 2394 days ago

Tom:

You’re right – I’ve been on pretty much every forum out there – tech forum (where you’re considered a n00b, not a newbie), car forums, cell phone forums, you name it.
As for the NYC firefighters – they do rock – but I’m not one of them. I’m just a lowly volunteer firefighter in my hometown – though I am friends with a number of NY’s bravest, I’m not worthy myself. :-)

Douglas, and Dorje – thanks for the links, I’ll be sure to check them out.

- Rick

-- - living vicariously through lumberjocks

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