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3/4 or 7/8?

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Forum topic by christherookie posted 02-27-2017 09:32 PM 873 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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christherookie

70 posts in 2884 days


02-27-2017 09:32 PM

I’m building a project in which 80% of it is lumber with a thickness of 3/4”. The other 20% calls for lumber that’s 7/8” thick. Looking at the plans, I don’t see why the difference except for a possible ascetic aspect on the ends of the daybed so you get a 3d look for the frame around the side. Because of where the daybed will go, I’m not worried about that. The 7/8 is only on the end of the bed with the armrests on top. It doesn’t seem like I’m dealing with load-bearing issues. So, it seems I can use 3/4 instead. And this is important because….I can buy 3/4 at my local Lowes but have to search near and far to find a place that sells or mills boards any wider.

I’m not sure if there was a question in there or I just had to think this through. Maybe the deeper question is when I work on projects that do REQUIRE thicker wood, am I talking millwork? What really sucks is my town used to have a great mill shop.


11 replies so far

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Madmark2

372 posts in 426 days


#1 posted 02-27-2017 09:52 PM

Resaw & plane and you can make any dims you want/need.

M

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Rick_M

10634 posts in 2218 days


#2 posted 02-27-2017 10:01 PM

Could be the person who originally made it had both 3/4 and 7/8 and that’s how they got used and it was copied to the plan. When I’ve milled 4/4, sometimes it comes out 3/4 and sometimes 7/8.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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papadan

3584 posts in 3206 days


#3 posted 02-27-2017 11:12 PM

Just go with the 3/4” if the slight reveal on the ends doesn’t matter.

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Rich

1981 posts in 427 days


#4 posted 02-28-2017 04:08 AM



Resaw & plane and you can make any dims you want/need.

M

- Madmark2

Genius. Who knew?

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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WDHLT15

1695 posts in 2313 days


#5 posted 02-28-2017 12:29 PM

I saw all my hardwood lumber at 1 1/8” thick rough. 90% planes to a full 1” with at least 1 face clean, but the other face may only be skipped planed. The boards all clean up S2S at 15/16”, so this gives my customers a good thick piece of wood to work with providing many different options on how they can use the board. Small sawmill operations like mine can concentrate on quality and not worry about high volume high speed like the big mills do that crank out tens of thousands of board feet per day.

The other plus is the price as my stock will cost 40% less than the Big Box Stores, plus you get the added thickness for flexibility. The box store wood that is prepared S4S does not allow any flexibility as the boards have to be perfect since they are planed down to a finished thickness of 3/4”. The problem is the boards sit in the racks, get handled, sometimes poorly, and they are not always perfect.

Maybe you can find a small operation relatively local that customs saws and kiln dries hardwood lumber that provides cheaper options and better flexibility. Search on Craigslist for lumber for sale in your local area and see what you can fine. BTW, where are you located?

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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dday

129 posts in 1267 days


#6 posted 02-28-2017 01:50 PM

If it matters, you can always face joint two 3/4 boards and laminate them together and then plane them on both sides to the desired thickness. But as many here have revealed, plans are suggestions. Make it yours. :)

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christherookie

70 posts in 2884 days


#7 posted 02-28-2017 02:23 PM

Thanks everyone. Danny, I’m in Indiana. For this project, I’m going with the 3/4 for everything, thanks to everyone’s recommendations. I’m also already 50% into the project and am at the point where I needed to decided about the 7/8 lumber. This is my first BIG project so much of it is learning technique, tool tricks, etc. I do have another project I want to do that calls for table legs around 2.75 square. And for those, I don’t want to buy the laminated stock so I’ll have to look for a local mill.

Who said woodworking was easy Ha!

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Andybb

550 posts in 441 days


#8 posted 03-01-2017 09:10 AM

I’m assuming you mean thicker instead of wider. Lowes & HD sells 1”x6”x8’ cedar/pine/oak boards that are 7/8 actual that can be jointed and made into wider stock. I like the look of the 7/8 and is a nice contrast when used with the 3/4” stock and ads a beefier look to the project. Especially furniture.

-- Andybb - GO HAWKS!

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christherookie

70 posts in 2884 days


#9 posted 03-01-2017 09:50 PM

Thanks Andy. I’ll check my local stores again. I have only seen 3/4 but maybe I’m not looking in the right place. I was supposed to pick up the lumber last night but ran out of time. before I jump on the 3/4 I’ll see what I can find.


I m assuming you mean thicker instead of wider. Lowes & HD sells 1”x6”x8 cedar/pine/oak boards that are 7/8 actual that can be jointed and made into wider stock. I like the look of the 7/8 and is a nice contrast when used with the 3/4” stock and ads a beefier look to the project. Especially furniture.

- Andybb


View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

2714 posts in 1318 days


#10 posted 03-01-2017 10:19 PM

When you buy lumber from a big box you are very limited.

You are basically looking for either 4/4 rough (and very straight) or 5/4 surfaced lumber which you will not find at a big box or might not even find at a hardwood supplier, as most of them cater to millwork shops, not furniture makers.

I have found the best way is go direct to a sawmill either with a log or you tell them what you want. Even then, you may get a wry grin when you say “5/4”.

You’re only other option is buy 2x lumber, which is 1 3/8 and mill down to 7/8. I’ve found the best lumber comes from a log you specify what you want, take home and wait a year….oh well.

Speaking of which, this from a friend who is a tree surgeon: sycamore 32” and crotch maple. I will have the sycamore 1/4 sawn.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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ArtMann

686 posts in 654 days


#11 posted 03-02-2017 04:16 AM

I don’t know what a wry grin is but all the lumber mills with which I do business talk in terms of 4/4, 5/4, 6/4 etc. I can buy any of those dimensions or have them custom saw it for me if I need it. They never say “inch and a quarter” or words like that. I have been buying lumber for some 40 years and that is the only terminology I or any of my suppliers ever used.

All the finished lumber that I have ever seen that was described as “two by” was 1.5 inches nominal.

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